Facing Change: White-Adjacent

Art & Music
Facing Change: White-Adjacent
Gather Exclusive!
Apr 19, 2021 Apr 19, 2021 1440 https://www.gatherlearning.com/classes/facing-change-white-adjacent Facing Change: White-Adjacent Brought to you by Barnes Foundation + Gather
Starts:
Apr 19, 2021
Anytime
Time:
3:00 pm
Anytime
Sessions:
1
Price:
$
FREE

“Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced.” —James Baldwin. Gather with us for Facing Change, our new online speaker series. Every other month, the Barnes is bringing together artists, scholars, and community activists virtually for a multicultural and intergenerational conversation about race in America. Today’s conversation focuses on the term “white-adjacent,” which describes a person who is part of a minority group but has access to, utilizes, or benefits from white privilege. The panel features writer Anne Ishii, filmmaker Rey Miranda, and musician Mel Hsu, with producer Loraine Ballard Morrill as moderator. During the program, you’ll be encouraged to use the chat function to submit your own questions.

Barnes Foundation
The mission of the Barnes is to promote the advancement of education and the appreciation of the fine arts and horticulture. Our founder, Dr. Albert C. Barnes, believed that art had the power to improve minds and transform lives. Our diverse educational programs are based on his teachings and one-of-a-kind collections. Philadelphia art collector Albert C. Barnes (1872–1951) chartered the Barnes Foundation in 1922 to teach people from all walks of life how to look at art. Over three decades, he collected some of the world’s most important impressionist, post-impressionist, and modern paintings, including works by Renoir, Cézanne, Matisse, and Picasso. He displayed them alongside African masks, native American jewelry, Greek antiquities, and decorative metalwork. Dr. Barnes was a strong supporter of progressive education and social justice, and he worked closely with black communities in the belief that people—like art—should not be segregated.
Learn more

More from

Barnes Foundation