From a Whisper to a Rallying Cry: The Killing of Vincent Chin and the Trial that Galvanized the Asian American Movement

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From a Whisper to a Rallying Cry: The Killing of Vincent Chin and the Trial that Galvanized the Asian American Movement
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Apr 20, 2021 Apr 20, 2021 1440 https://www.gatherlearning.com/classes/from-a-whisper-to-a-rallying-cry-the-killing-of-vincent-chin-and-the-trial-that-galvanized-the-asian-american-movement From a Whisper to a Rallying Cry: The Killing of Vincent Chin and the Trial that Galvanized the Asian American Movement Brought to you by National Archives of the United States + Gather
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In 1982, anti–Asian American sentiment simmered, especially in Detroit, where U.S. autoworkers believed Japanese car companies were costing them their jobs. A bar fight turned fatal, leaving a Chinese American man, Vincent Chin, beaten to death at the hands of two White men. With From a Whisper to a Rallying Cry, Paula Yoo examines the killing and the trial. When the killers received a $3,000 fine and probation, the community outrage led to a federal civil rights trial―the first involving a crime against an Asian American―and galvanized what came to be known as the Asian American movement.

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