Search results for

...

Filters
DATE
More
Date
Less
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
type
More
type
Less
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
Price
More
Price
Less
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
20 classes available
Icons/UI/ic_filter_sml
Filters
Icons/UI/ic_sort_descending
Sort by
classes
Sort by:
(Re)Define the Landscape: Howardena Pindell, Kara Walker, and Kerry James Marshall
(Re)Define the Landscape: Howardena Pindell, Kara Walker, and Kerry James Marshall
-
Harvard Art Museums
What does it mean to redefine the (art) landscape? Gather with curator Mary Schneider Enriquez and Ph.D. candidate Chassidy Winestock for a conversation reflecting on works by Howardena Pindell, Kara Walker, and Kerry James Marshall. Revisiting works in the Harvard Art Museums collections, they will look with fresh eyes, informed by the contemporary moment, at questions of race and representation and the ways these artists have put pressure on museum spaces and the broader landscape of the art world.
Art & Music
|
March 10, 2021
2021-03-10
|
Live
|
FREE
18th Century Chintz Banyans: Mapping Patterns at the Royal Ontario Museum
18th Century Chintz Banyans: Mapping Patterns at the Royal Ontario Museum
-
Royal Ontario Museum
Explore the creation of three 18th century gentleman's informal chintz gowns (banyans) from the ROM's permanent collection with Gervers Fellow Berta Pavlov. This illustrated talk traces the process of textile and garment pattern design, recreated through careful examination of these beautiful and fashionable garments at the ROM. Berta Pavlov is Professor at the Center for Arts, Design & Information Technology at George Brown College, teaching in both the Undergraduate and Graduate programs. She has over 30 years experience working as a patternmaker and technical illustrator within the Toronto fashion industry. Pavlov researched patterns and sewing techniques for the ROM’s exhibition Christian Dior and it’s accompanying publication Christian Dior, History and Modernity. Berta Pavlov is the 2020 Veronika Gervers research Fellow.
Art & Music
|
March 31, 2021
2021-03-31
|
Live
|
FREE
19th Century New Orleans' Free Black Brotherhood
19th Century New Orleans' Free Black Brotherhood
-
Commonwealth Club
Gather with us for a virtual discussion with Fatima Shaik about New Orleans' vibrant and singular French-speaking Creole culture. Statistics show that for the first four decades of the 19th century, almost half of the city’s Black people were free. This compares to only 14 percent nationwide prior to 1865. In the face of an oppressive white society, though, members of the Société d'Economie et d'Assistance Mutuelle built a community and held it together throughout the era of slavery, the Civil War, Reconstruction, and Jim Crow terrorism. Shaik reconstructs the Economy Hall culture by following Ludger Boguille, and his family and friends, through landmark events—from the Haitian Revolution to the birth of jazz—that helped shape New Orleans and the United States. Based on a century's worth of handwritten journals, which Shaik's father rescued from a trash hauler's pickup truck, the story that emerges from those journals' pages reveals one of the most important multiethnic, intellectual communities in the U.S. South: educators, world-traveling merchants, soldiers, tradesmen, and poets. Although Louisiana law classified them as men of color, Negroes, or Blacks, the Economie brothers rejected these racial distinctions, and their implied racism and colorism, to fight for suffrage and education rights for all. Shaik, a direct descendant of an Economy Hall member, has constructed a meticulously detailed narrative of New Orleans' unique history.
Culture & Politics
|
March 11, 2021
2021-03-11
|
Live
|
FREE
2034: A Novel of the Next World War
2034: A Novel of the Next World War
-
Yale University
The Jackson Institute for Global Affairs will host a virtual discussion with Visiting Fellow Adm. Jim Stavridis regarding his new book—his tenth, but his first work of fiction. Stavridis is the former Supreme Allied Commander of NATO and Dean of The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. He is currently an Operating Executive at The Carlyle Group. 2034: A Novel of the Next World War, is a geopolitical thriller that imagines a naval clash between the United States and China in the South China Sea, and the path from there to a global confrontation. Featured as a six-part series in Wired Magazine, 2034 is written as a disturbingly plausible work of speculative fiction. The novel takes us inside the minds of American, Chinese, Iranian, Russian, and Indian officials, as a series of miscalculations on all sides leads the world into an intensifying international storm. How can the United States and China prevent strategic competition from spiraling into conflict? How can works of fiction inspire creative, innovative approaches to Sino-American relations? The conversation will be moderated by Paul Kennedy, J. Richardson Dilworth Professor of History and Global Affairs.
Reading & Writing
|
March 10, 2021
2021-03-10
|
Live
|
FREE
A Celebration of International Women’s Day with Her Majesty Queen Rania Al Abdullah of Jordan
A Celebration of International Women’s Day with Her Majesty Queen Rania Al Abdullah of Jordan
-
Harvard Kennedy School
In celebration of International Women’s Day 2021, Her Majesty Queen Rania Al Abdullah of Jordan joins the Center for International Development, Belfer Center’s Middle East Initiative, Women and Public Policy Program, and the Institute of Politics at Harvard Kennedy School to discuss women’s empowerment, cross-cultural dialogue, and innovative solutions to global challenges. The conversation will be moderated by Melani Cammett, Clarence Dillon Professor of International Affairs at Harvard.
Culture & Politics
|
March 8, 2021
2021-03-08
|
Live
|
FREE
A Conversation on Black Futures with Kimberly Drew and Jenna Wortham
A Conversation on Black Futures with Kimberly Drew and Jenna Wortham
-
Smithsonian Institution
Join authors Kimberly Drew and Jenna Wortham in conversation with NMAAHC curator Michelle ​Joan Wilkinson as they discuss their visions for the present and future and the way they see these visions captured ​by artists, activists, and thinkers. Their new book, Black Futures, poses a central pressing question, "What does it mean to be Black and alive right now?" The result is a collection of essays, photography, memes, visual art, tweets, poetry, and more, that place archive, technology, and Afrofuturist ideas in conversation. Kimberly and Jenna will be joined by Alisha B. Wormsley, whose project There Are Black People in the Future is featured in the book. This event is part of an ongoing series on the theme of Afrofuturism in partnership with the National Museum of African American History and Culture and the National Museum of African Art.
Culture & Politics
|
March 11, 2021
2021-03-11
|
Live
|
FREE
A Conversation with Abbe Smith, Author of “Guilty People”
A Conversation with Abbe Smith, Author of “Guilty People”
-
Washington University in St. Louis
Join us for a conversation with Abbe Smith, the Scott K. Ginsburg Professor of Law at Georgetown Law and director of the Criminal Defense & Prisoner Advocacy Clinic. Professor Smith will discuss her new book, “Guilty People.” The conversation will be moderated by WashULaw professor and director of the Appellate Clinic, Daniel Harawa.
Reading & Writing
|
March 11, 2021
2021-03-11
|
Live
|
FREE
A Conversation with Pat Brown: Impossible Foods
A Conversation with Pat Brown: Impossible Foods
-
Stanford University
Patrick O. Brown is CEO and founder of Impossible Foods, a company at the forefront of making nutritious, delicious meat and dairy products from plants to satisfy meat lovers and address the environmental impact of animal farming. The idea for Impossible Foods came to Pat while he was on sabbatical from professor of biochemistry at the Stanford University School of Medicine. In reflecting on how he could use his training and experience to make the largest positive impact on the world, he realized there was a way to make delicious, affordable meat and dairy products, directly from plants – that would be better for the environment and for consumers. In 2011, Pat chose to devote himself full time to Impossible Foods. After receiving his B.A., M.D. and Ph.D. (in Biochemistry) at the University of Chicago, Pat completed a residency in pediatrics at Chicago’s Children’s Memorial Hospital. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine and recipient of the American Cancer Society Medal of Honor. This event is one in a series of wide-ranging, informal conversations hosted by the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment. Each conversation will explore the who, how, and why behind major developments in environmental science and policy.
Science & Nature
|
March 11, 2021
2021-03-11
|
Live
|
FREE
A Tale of Two Cities: The Art, Culture and History of London and Paris
A Tale of Two Cities: The Art, Culture and History of London and Paris
-
Rice University
Art historian Leo Costello, Ph.D., explores the interwoven histories of two metropolises, London and Paris, through the lens of their respective art histories. We compare the artistic developments of the two cities in the 18th century, considering how their national identities and governments influenced artists and art movements. We also follow the momentous changes wrought by the French Revolution and Napoleonic Wars in both countries, as they influenced movements such as neoclassicism and Romanticism. We then chart the emergence of realism in the 19th century, leading to Impressionism and Post-Impressionism. Finally, we move into the 20th century, seeing how technology and urbanism informed the innovations of artists in both cities, before the devastating effects of World War I. Join us for this lively exploration of the art, culture and history of London and Paris from the 18th to the 20th centuries. Topics include: Reversals of Fortune: The 17th Century; The Rococo and the Kit-Kat Club: The 18th Century; You Say You Want a Revolution? David and the Politics of Art; War and Peace: The Napoleonic Years; Impressionism and the City; Victorians and Symbolists; and Art and the Great War in London and Paris.
Art & Music
|
March 25, 2021
2021-03-25
|
Live
|
230
Abstract Drawing
Abstract Drawing
-
92nd Street Y
Focusing on shape, color, line, and texture students will use materials ranging from pencil, chalk, charcoal, ink, or anything else they are inspired by to create dynamic works through the lens of abstraction.
Art & Music
|
March 9, 2021
2021-03-09
|
Live
|
190
Addressing Anti-Asian Violence
Addressing Anti-Asian Violence
-
Commonwealth Club
Anti-Asian crimes have spiked since the pandemic started, with more than 3,000 incidents occurring all across the country. What is behind this increase in hate crimes, what is being done about it, and what still needs to be done to stop it? Gather with us for a discussion with three Asian American leaders about addressing anti-Asian violence in America: Nikki Fortunato Bas, President, Oakland City Council; Russell Jeung, Professor of Asian American Studies, San Francisco State University; Author, Family Sacrifices: The Worldviews and Ethics of Chinese Americans; and Michelle Kim, CEO, Awaken; Author, The Wake Up: Closing the Gap Between Good Intentions and Real Change (forthcoming).
Culture & Politics
|
March 11, 2021
2021-03-11
|
Live
|
FREE
Adult Art Class: Bon Vivant—Collage and Found Object Sculptures
Adult Art Class: Bon Vivant—Collage and Found Object Sculptures
-
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Bon Vivant classes are a great way to end the week! Pour yourself a drink, relax, and create! Gather old greeting cards, junk mail, magazines, photos, containers, etc. and turn them into art. Cut, paste, paint, build, repeat! View mixed media works from LACMA’s collection for inspiration. All skill levels are welcome in this fun class. With artist Rosanne Kleinerman. For ages 21+. Join on your computer or tablet wherever you have internet. A Zoom link and art materials list will be sent to you prior to class. Students are responsible for providing their own art materials based on recommendations provided by the teaching artist.
Art & Music
|
March 19, 2021
2021-03-19
|
Live
|
45
Aesthetics of Memory, Narratives of Repair
Aesthetics of Memory, Narratives of Repair
-
Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard
At Radcliffe, Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela returns to the archive of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission to think through the horrific violence in contemporary South Africa. Is this violence a reflection of “ghosts” from the past, the death of hope in the present, or a combination of both? Looking at the possibility of repair and “healing” of what remains of violent histories and what continues transgenerationally, she will explore ways in which a sense of solidarity and responsible citizenship might be restored through what she terms “reparative humanism.” The project will culminate in a book titled “Aesthetics of Memory and Narratives of Repair.”
Culture & Politics
|
March 10, 2021
2021-03-10
|
Live
|
FREE
After Dark Online: Bees
After Dark Online: Bees
-
Exploratorium
The buzz is true: This After Dark Online will be the bees’ knees! They may be small, but the impact of bees is mighty, and the work of these flying insects plays key roles in sustaining ecosystems as well as human life. At this After Dark, dive into the rich tradition of beekeeping—and its output—as well as the fascinating biology of bees. Then learn more about which species of bees are at risk and why.
Science & Nature
|
April 8, 2021
2021-04-08
|
Live
|
FREE
After Dark Online: Fractals
After Dark Online: Fractals
-
Exploratorium
From forests to farms and skies to shores, we’re surrounded by fractals. These infinitely complex patterns, which emerge from repeating a simple process over and over, are aesthetically astonishing and a valuable tool for creating meaning from chaos. Tonight, practice your pattern recognition as we dig into fractals—where they show up in nature, how they can be used to understand scientific concepts, and their role in aiding predictions. Then indulge in some celebration of this phenomenon's exceptional beauty.
Science & Nature
|
March 11, 2021
2021-03-11
|
Live
|
FREE
After Dark Online: Second Nature
After Dark Online: Second Nature
-
Exploratorium
Join a live conversation with acclaimed author and essayist Nathaniel Rich on the subject of his latest book, Second Nature, a collection of Rich’s artfully crafted science reporting on the upsetting effects of environmental exploitation and the stories of individuals who seek to correct them. In the context of the anthropocene, Rich asks: as a species with the power to destroy nature, can we use the same tools to remake it?
Science & Nature
|
March 25, 2021
2021-03-25
|
Live
|
FREE
After Dark Online: Shifting Spring
After Dark Online: Shifting Spring
-
Exploratorium
What is the meaning of spring? It may seem clear: a seasonal shift as the days lengthen and warm, blooms start to appear on trees, and birds and bees get busy. But the signs of spring may be different for different people, organisms, and ecosystems—and they may vary from year to year, influenced by climate change and other factors. In this After Dark, part of our series Conversations about Landscape, we’ll be joined by scientists who observe nature through different lenses, from the community-driven science project iNaturalist to long-term scientific observations of landscapes and plankton in San Francisco Bay, and find out what their observations reveal about shifting seasons and the broader impacts of climate change on landscapes, ecosystems, and human communities.
Science & Nature
|
March 18, 2021
2021-03-18
|
Live
|
FREE
After Dark Online: Transgender Day of Visibility
After Dark Online: Transgender Day of Visibility
-
Exploratorium
Observed on March 31, Transgender Day of Visibility is an international day of awareness and celebration built from decades of activism in response to the intentional exclusion of transgender people and voices in our culture and discourse. Transgender experiences expand and challenge our often limited models of gender, sex, and identity. In this program, we highlight transgender individuals in STEAM fields, offer cultural and scientific context for transgender experiences, and celebrate the diversity of human expression.
Culture & Politics
|
April 1, 2021
2021-04-01
|
Live
|
FREE
Aging and the Brain
Aging and the Brain
-
Stanford Continuing Studies
Have you ever walked into a room and forgotten why you came in? Do you continually misplace your wallet or car keys? Adults of any age can identify with these “senior” moments, often eliciting a mild chuckle from friends and family members. But at what point do these seemingly innocuous moments become something more? This workshop will provide a comprehensive understanding of normal cognition in older adults and dispel many societal myths about aging. Issues that will be addressed include: What is normal cognitive aging, and what are its stages? What is dementia, and what are its prevalence, causes, and symptoms? Is it different from something like Alzheimer’s disease? Can one recover from the effects of cognitive decline? How can we separate normal forgetting from depression and lack of motivation? This workshop will also touch upon some controversial issues such as the notion of brain fitness, and the capacity for consent to treatment.
Health & Wellness
|
March 13, 2021
2021-03-13
|
Live
|
340
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Elizabeth Warren on Trump, the Supreme Court, and the Election
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Elizabeth Warren on Trump, the Supreme Court, and the Election
-
The New Yorker
From The New Yorker Festival in October, the two progressive members of Congress talk about what it will take to defeat Trump. See if they were right.
Culture & Politics
|
March 21, 2021
2021-03-21
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Alison Bechdel in conversation with George McCalman
Alison Bechdel in conversation with George McCalman
-
City Arts & Lectures
Alison Bechdel's cult following for her early comic strip Dykes to Watch Out For grew wildly in response to her family memoirs, the best-selling graphic memoir Fun Home, adapted into a Tony Award-winning musical, and Are You My Mother? She has become a cultural household name for the concept of the Bechdel Test, a metric used when considering the representation of women in fiction. Bechdel has been named a MacArthur Fellow and Cartoonist Laureate of Vermont, among many other honors. Her new memoir, The Secret to Superhuman Strength, delivers a deeply layered story of her fascination, from childhood to adulthood, with every fitness craze to come down the pike: from Jack LaLanne in the 60s (“Outlandish jumpsuit! Cantaloupe-sized guns!”) to the existential oddness of present-day spin class. George McCalman is an artist and creative director based in San Francisco. His studio, McCalman.Co, designs brands for a range of cultural clientele. Additionally, he’s a visual columnist for the San Francisco Chronicle, featured in the “Observed” and “First Person” columns. His first book, Illustrated Black History, is due to be published by Amistad/Harper Collins Fall 2021. Ticket includes a hardcover copy of Bechdel’s new memoir The Secret to Superhuman Strength. Books will be mailed the week of the event.
Reading & Writing
|
May 7, 2021
2021-05-07
|
Live
|
FREE
Alonzo King in Conversation with Steven Winn
Alonzo King in Conversation with Steven Winn
-
City Arts & Lectures
Hailed as a visionary choreographer, Alonzo King is altering the way we look at ballet. King calls his works “thought structures” created by the manipulation of energies that exist in matter through laws, which govern the shapes and movement directions of everything that exists. He has guided Alonzo King LINES Ballet with his unique artistic vision since 1982. A former commissioner for the city and county of San Francisco, and a writer and lecturer on the art of dance; his contributions appear in the books Masters of Movement: Portraits of American Choreographers and in Dance Masters: Interviews with Legends of Dance.
Art & Music
|
April 14, 2021
2021-04-14
|
Live
|
29
American Short Story Masterpieces Greatest Hits
American Short Story Masterpieces Greatest Hits
-
University of Chicago Graham School
American writers have created a body of literature great in its illumination into the deeps of the human condition and our own lives. These stories communicate through originality, masterly prose and imagination in presenting pathos, comedy and irony.
Reading & Writing
|
March 30, 2021
2021-03-30
|
Live
|
425
An Introduction to iPhoneography: Using Your Smartphone to Make Extraordinary Images
An Introduction to iPhoneography: Using Your Smartphone to Make Extraordinary Images
-
Stanford Continuing Studies
Discover how to turn your ordinary snapshots into extraordinary photographs using the power of the device that is always with you. Smartphones are the most important camera of our age, used for capturing everything from family events to business applications, and for making art and documenting current events. In this hands-on course, you will learn how to expertly capture images, edit, and create photographs with your iPhone. You will gain inspiration and find your creative vision by discovering your style and expanding your technical knowledge in the field of iPhoneography. We will start by using the built-in photo app to edit and enhance iPhone photos, and we will discuss tips for optimizing the features and working around the limitations of the native (built-in) camera. We will then see demonstrations and learn the details of several third-party editing and creative applications as well as a variety of helpful accessories for enhancing and embellishing iPhoneography images. Finally, we will review iPhone photography accessories as well as best practices for saving, organizing, sharing, and printing your images. This course is for students of all levels. An iPhone 6s Plus or newer is required; iPhone software should be updated to iOS 14 or newer. Students can expect to spend $12 on apps; accessories are optional purchases.
Film & Photography
|
April 17, 2021
2021-04-17
|
Live
|
270
Art Has No Country
Art Has No Country
-
The British Museum
What is the impact of displacement, migration and exile on artists who have been forced to leave their homes, or who have chosen to make their lives in another country? Journalist and editor Jo Glanville talks to Iranian artist Afsoon and Iraqi artist Mahmoud Obaidi – who both explore ideas of homeland and nostalgia in their work – and to Almir Koldzic, Director of Counterpoints Arts (Opens in new window), an organization that works with migrant and refugee artists. "I believe that all countries are homelands for their inhabitants, so why should they not be homelands for me?" says Obaidi. For Afsoon, "Iran lives inside me. I create and re-create it through my work." The two artists will reflect on the importance of memory, geography and a sense of place in their practice, as their work is showcased in a major new British Museum exhibition, "Reflections: Contemporary Art of the Middle East and North Africa."
Art & Music
|
March 18, 2021
2021-03-18
|
Live
|
FREE
Art History from Home: Portable Landscapes
Art History from Home: Portable Landscapes
-
Whitney Museum of American Art
I paint from remembered landscapes that I carry with me, Joan Mitchell once said. What does it mean to say we carry landscapes with us, especially when they have otherwise been rendered remote? Inspired by works by Georgia O'Keeffe, Joan Mitchell, Ruth Asawa, and Janiva Ellis in the Whitney's permanent collection, this session considers how art renders nature portable—by preserving, translating, and transporting it. Grant Johnson is a Ph.D. candidate in the department of art history at the University of Southern California and a Joan Tisch Teaching Fellow at the Whitney. His dissertation, Sheila Hicks: Weaving to the World, traces the first critical history of the prolific American artist, weaver, and pioneer of global contemporary art. An active curator, critic, and writer, he has published work in Artforum, Frieze, The Brooklyn Rail, Garage, and Performa Magazine, where he was a writer-in-residence from 2012 to 2014.
Art & Music
|
March 9, 2021
2021-03-09
|
Live
|
FREE
Art Industry Contexts: Behind the Scenes at the NGV Triennial 2020
Art Industry Contexts: Behind the Scenes at the NGV Triennial 2020
-
National Gallery of Victoria
Go behind the scenes of NGV Triennial 2020. Following an introduction to key works, themes and ideas in the exhibition, gain insight from NGV experts into the preparation, presentation and conservation of artworks for a major exhibition. This virtual program includes guest speakers from NGV Curatorial, Conservation, Marketing and Exhibition design teams. Please prepare questions for a question and answer session.
Art & Music
|
March 10, 2021
2021-03-10
|
Live
|
10
Art Talk Live: Liberty, Equality, Sorority? A Woman Printmaker in the French Revolution
Art Talk Live: Liberty, Equality, Sorority? A Woman Printmaker in the French Revolution
-
Harvard Art Museums
The French Revolution saw an explosion of printed media and printmakers—including women, who used their artistic production to participate in the politics they were legally excluded from because of their gender. In this talk, curatorial intern and Ph.D. candidate Sarah Lund will unfold the layers of this large color print, from the radical Jacobin revolutionary who made it and the martyred war hero it depicts to the woman artist who, by blood, by marriage, and by trade, was equally entangled in the print’s politics even as she was excluded from its image.
Art & Music
|
April 6, 2021
2021-04-06
|
Live
|
FREE
Art Talk Live: The Art of Extinction in Early Modern Europe
Art Talk Live: The Art of Extinction in Early Modern Europe
-
Harvard Art Museums
Climate change has brought renewed and urgent interest in the relationship between human behavior and the mass extinction of animal species and their habitats. Early modern Europeans, too, were preoccupied with extinction, and many works of art bear witness to their concerns. Focusing on Antonio Tempesta’s print A Wolf Hunt, with a Dead Ram as Bait, this talk led by Sarah Mallory, Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History of Art and Architecture, will examine the period’s various notions of extinction, while also drawing connections with contemporary thinking on the subject in museums and elsewhere.
Art & Music
|
March 23, 2021
2021-03-23
|
Live
|
FREE
Art and Empathy: Community Care Through Art
Art and Empathy: Community Care Through Art
-
Brooklyn Museum
Go behind the scenes of NGV Triennial 2020. Following an introduction to key works, themes and ideas in the exhibition, gain insight from NGV experts into the preparation, presentation and conservation of artworks for a major exhibition. This virtual program includes guest speakers from NGV Curatorial, Conservation, Marketing and Exhibition design teams. Please prepare questions for a question and answer session.
Art & Music
|
March 10, 2021
2021-03-10
|
Live
|
10
Art and Gender in an Age of Revolution
Art and Gender in an Age of Revolution
-
Duke University
This talk by Professor Simon Partner (History, Duke University) will be based on the life of Kawai Koume, an artist and housewife in a bushi family in Kishūdomain who kept a diary from the 1830s till the 1880s. Koume's diary offers a window into life in a scholarly middle-class family before and after the Meiji Restoration. The talk will focus on the social economy of Koume's artistic production - who she painted for, what rewards she got, and how the transformations of Japan's society and economy following the Meiji Restoration affected her work. Discussant: Gennifer Weisenfeld, Professor, Art, Art History and Visual Studies, Duke. Simon Partner is Professor of History at Duke University. His interest in Japanese history ‘from the bottom up’ has led him to focus on the lives of little-known individuals – farmers, workers, merchants, and housewives. He has published four biographies based on this research, most recently The Merchant’s Tale: Yokohama and the Transformation of Japan (Columbia University Press, 2017). He is currently a Visiting Research Scholar at the International Research Center for Japanese Studies (Nichibunken), where he is working on a history of the Restoration era as seen through the life of Kawai Koume.
Art & Music
|
March 18, 2021
2021-03-18
|
Live
|
FREE
Art-Inspired Yoga
Art-Inspired Yoga
-
Williams College
Looking at Thomas Sills’s oil painting titled “Summer,” this one-hour, vinyasa-style online yoga class brings a splash of sunshine to the long Berkshire winter. It explores the interplay between form and color through bright and hopeful movement. Instructor Emily Kamen (MA ‘20, she/her) is an art historian, educator, environmentalist, and lover of movement. A life-long dancer, her yoga practice strengthened and developed while she was an undergraduate student at Princeton University. She completed her 200-level teacher training at YogaStream in 2014 and has been teaching students of all ages and abilities since. Having trained under Lara Heimann, physical therapist and founder of LYT yoga, Emily’s practice is grounded in principles of functional mobility and alignment. In addition to yoga studios, her classes are often sited in art museums and organic vegetable farms. Emily is always looking for creative ways to combine and refine her passions for art, environmental consciousness, living beings of all species, and joyful movement.
Health & Wellness
|
March 9, 2021
2021-03-09
|
Live
|
FREE
Artist Spotlight Stories: Oksana Mirzoyan
Artist Spotlight Stories: Oksana Mirzoyan
-
The University of Michigan
For nearly a decade, the art of Oksana Mirzoyan has been exploring the social and cultural experiences of the Nagorno-Karabagh conflict. The territorial engagement, which began in the 1980s and unfolded across Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Nagorno-Karabagh was the catalyst for a sequence of pogroms leveled against Armenians living in major cities of the former Azerbaijan Soviet Socialist Republic, from Sumgait to Kirovabad (Ganja) and in 1990, the capital city of Baku. The conflict had a massive influence not only on the cultural and political geography of the South Caucasus but continues to shape the everyday experience of people living in the region today as well as generations of displaced Armenians and Azerbaijanis. Among the millions forced to evacuate the region, thousands arrived in the United States, concentrating in urban and suburban communities, including in Detroit and surrounding Southeast Michigan. Born in Baku, Mirzoyan arrived in Detroit with her family as a result of the Nagorno-Karabagh conflict. Mirzoyan’s research into the war starts with her passport photo as a refugee being granted asylum in the US in 1991. This discussion will include a screening of her short experimental works that use archival family footage (“Baku 1977”) and capture sceneries or people's lives in the city of Shushi (Swallows flying in the city of Shushi; "Barber of Shushi"). Her intimate knowledge of the region comes from her first-hand experience of walking on its minefields with Halo Trust, teaching filmmaking to students in Stepanakert (the capital city of Artsakh), and collecting the stories of its citizens. Much of Mirzoyan's art is an exploration of the filmmaker's personal trauma tied to the conflict in Nagorno-Karabagh/Artsakh and presents a journey of healing her past through her relationship with the country.
Film & Photography
|
March 10, 2021
2021-03-10
|
Live
|
FREE
Artist Talk: Glenn Ligon and Hilton Als
Artist Talk: Glenn Ligon and Hilton Als
-
Princeton University
Artist Glenn Ligon, whose work draws on literature and history to explore race, language, desire, and identity, joins Pulitzer Prize–winning author and critic Hilton Als to discuss the ways in which art can engage and rethink the most urgent issues of our time.
Art & Music
|
March 11, 2021
2021-03-11
|
Live
|
FREE
Artists on Artworks: Jordan Casteel on Gerhard Richter
Artists on Artworks: Jordan Casteel on Gerhard Richter
-
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Painter Jordan Casteel reflects on works in the current Met exhibition Gerhard Richter: Painting After All, considering figuration and the role of photography in her own practice. Recorded in May, 2020. this event also provides access to a virtual tour of the Met's exhibit.
Art & Music
|
March 17, 2021
2021-03-17
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Ask the Scribe: Everything You Wanted to Know About Scribes
Ask the Scribe: Everything You Wanted to Know About Scribes
-
The University of Cambridge
As part of Cambridge University Library's exhibition Ghost Words: Reading the Past ('opens' online Monday 1 March), on palimpsest manuscripts, find out about the work of an expert who continues the Jewish tradition of handcopying sacred texts. Learn about the work of the Sofer (Hebrew Scribe) at this event hosted by the Genizah Research Unit. The materials, rules and methods involved in creating and fixing Sifrey Torah, tefillin, mezuzot and megillot according to sacred traditions. How do modern day scribes work with parchment, make ink, cut a quill, write the holy words, sticking to the myriad of rules on letter forms. Correct mistakes and make repairs? Which name should be blotted out before writing and why? What happens when a dog eats your Torah? Or there’s an accident with hagbahah (elevation) or some nuns have a megillat Esther and more. There will also be an opportunity to ask questions during the event via Zoom's Q&A function. Supported by the Littman Genizah Educational Programme. About the speaker: Marc Michaels is a Hebrew scribe – a sofer ST”aM and an expert presenting and writing on topics related to Jewish scribal practice. He is also a Strategy and Creative Director at a London agency and a graphic designer. Marc is currently studying part-time for a PhD at Cambridge University (FAMES), researching Sefer Tagin, the manual for sofrim (scribes) concerning the decorative tagin (tittles) and ‘strange’ letter forms that adorn certain words in the Torah. His first academic monograph Sefer Tagin Fragments from the Cairo Genizah: A Critical Edition, Commentary and Reconstruction, part of the Cambridge Genizah Studies Series was published in late 2020. (Note, live from Cambridge, this event begins at 1pm Eastern Time in the US).
Reading & Writing
|
March 8, 2021
2021-03-08
|
Live
|
FREE
Assembling an Administration
Assembling an Administration
-
The Atlantic
The votes are counted. Now, the task of building a government begins. President-elect Joe Biden must come into office prepared to solve an economic crisis and manage a pandemic on Inauguration Day and beyond. In a virtual forum in mid-December, Atlantic journalists led conversations exploring what it takes to create a team and set a new course for national policy and politics. We heard from present and former government officials and election experts with unique perspectives on executive branch transitions and what the on-ramp to the presidency looks like.
Culture & Politics
|
March 22, 2021
2021-03-22
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Australian Food with Bill Granger
Australian Food with Bill Granger
-
Sydney Opera House
Crowned the ‘Egg Master of Sydney’ and ‘creator of avocado toast’, Bill Granger is renowned as the restauranteur who brought laid-back Australian cafe culture to the world, and is beloved by family cooks and culinary sophisticates alike. The empire that is ‘bills’ began with the original Darlinghurst street-corner cafe 26 years ago and is credited as the first place anywhere to put the now-iconic breakfast of avocado toast on the menu. Since then, from Sydney to Tokyo, London to Seoul, people around the world have queued for a taste of his absurdly fluffy ricotta hotcakes and creamy scrambled eggs, and fallen in love with this sunny, relaxed, and very Australian way of eating. Ahead of his new book release, Australian Food, Bill Granger talks with food writer Adam Liaw to celebrate the global phenomenon of Australian cafe culture, the evolution of a national cuisine and the uniqueness of Australian food. Recorded live in July, 2020 from the Sydney Opera House.
Food & Drink
|
March 9, 2021
2021-03-09
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Ayad Akhtar: Homeland Elegies
Ayad Akhtar: Homeland Elegies
-
Chicago Humanities Festival
Homeland Elegies is Pulitzer-winning playwright and novelist Ayad Akhtar’s lyrical response to post-9/11, Trump-era American politics. Drawing on his perspective as the child of Muslim immigrants, Akhtar pens an elegy to the American dream. Part memoir, part fiction, this novel about a father and son searching for belonging paints a picture of disillusionment. Akhtar is joined at CHF by Obama-administration alumnus and founder of Interfaith Youth Core Eboo Patel to discuss his latest book and what it means to call a country home.
Reading & Writing
|
March 15, 2021
2021-03-15
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Ballet Basics: Life Behind the Curtain
Ballet Basics: Life Behind the Curtain
-
San Francisco Ballet
Ballet Basics is designed to give you all the information you need to better appreciate and enjoy SF Ballet. These 2-hour seminars will give participants a foundation in the history and practices of the art form. Watch a professional dancer take a ballet barre, hear from an artist, and learn about the history of classical ballet.
Art & Music
|
May 2, 2021
2021-05-02
|
Live
|
25
Ballet Technique and Enrichment for Active Seniors
Ballet Technique and Enrichment for Active Seniors
-
San Francisco Ballet
This class is specifically designed for seniors who love fitness and ballet. Classes will offer the benefits of a classical ballet technique class with gentle modifications to honor well-lived backs, hips, knees, and ankles. Once a month, a San Francisco Ballet Audience Engagement Program Expert will “zoom in” with a short in-class experience encompassing dance history, repertory analysis, and other opportunities to learn about the World of Dance and SF Ballet.
Health & Wellness
|
March 9, 2021
2021-03-09
|
Live
|
10
Beginning Acting
Beginning Acting
-
Berkeley Repertory Theater
Develop a basic understanding of acting fundamentals through Stanislavski-based practice. Using exercises and scene work, this class introduces students to the elements of dramatic action, text analysis, and character development, as well as the tools for releasing inhibitions and expanding vocal and physical range.
Art & Music
|
April 13, 2021
2021-04-13
|
Live
|
$170
Behind the Mission: Race and Gender at the World Bank Group
Behind the Mission: Race and Gender at the World Bank Group
-
The World Bank
To commemorate International Women’s Day ​and affirm the World Bank Group’s strong commitment ​to continuously foster gender equity and eradicate racism not only within the WBG but also in its client countries, this episode of Behind the Mission series will feature Sandie Okoro, Senior Vice President and Group General Counsel of the World Bank Group and Chair of the WBG Taskforce on Racism. Gather with us to hear Okoro's insights on the intersectionality of race and gender, as well as her experiences and advice on having a career in international development.
Culture & Politics
|
March 9, 2021
2021-03-09
|
Live
|
FREE
Better with Champagne: An Effervescent Tasting with Ariel Arce
Better with Champagne: An Effervescent Tasting with Ariel Arce
-
French Institute: Alliance Francaise
Virtual Wine Tour de France kicks off with an effervescent Champagne & cheese tasting and masterclass guided by Ariel Arce, the “Champagne Empress of Greenwich Village.” The series continues this spring with stops in Bordeaux and Burgundy, before culminating with a festive summer celebration of wine and music. Tasting kits will be available for purchase and home delivery ahead of each tasting. In English. Featured Champagne: Laherte Frères, Brut Ultradition NV; Pierre Paillard, Extra Brut Les Parcelles Bouzy Grand Cru NV; Champagne Delamotte, Brut Tradition NV.
Food & Drink
|
March 25, 2021
2021-03-25
|
Live
|
15
Beyond Borders with Photographer Amira Al-Sharif
Beyond Borders with Photographer Amira Al-Sharif
-
WGBH Boston
In her nearly two-decade-long career as a photojournalist, Yemeni photographer Amira Al-Sharif documented the multi-cultural lives of women, the beauty of ordinary daily life, and now the horror of a long raging and brutal war. Through stunning images of her beloved country of Yemen, Amira bears witness to what has been termed “the worst man-made humanitarian crisis in the world.” In this conversation, Amira talks about her life-long bond with the camera, her work to unveil misconceptions, and struggles to keep documenting lived experiences, while finding glimmers of hope in a place consumed by conflict and suffering. Using the lens of her camera, and unlocking her “bitter-sweet” memories, Amira reveals her artistic mission to rescue “the fleeting, hiding, or missing scenes” from her journey as a war photographer.
Film & Photography
|
April 1, 2021
2021-04-01
|
Live
|
FREE
Big Night at the Museum
Big Night at the Museum
-
Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum
There has never been a night like BIG NIGHT (At the Museum). Troubled times often bring out the best in us all, and these times have called for the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum to remove some of its most treasured instruments from their cases, and place them in the hands of modern masters for an unprecedented night of music. In this on-demand opportunity, you can enjoy the live broadcast from the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum in Nashville where some of country's greatest current stars were able to play on the Museum's historic instruments, for one night only.
Art & Music
|
March 14, 2021
2021-03-14
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Billie's Blues: The Life and Genius of Billie Holiday
Billie's Blues: The Life and Genius of Billie Holiday
-
Jazz at Lincoln Center
Jazz's greatest vocalist, the inventor of Swing Song, and one of the most iconic figures in 20th Century music history, Billie Holiday looms large even within the pantheon of music greats. Throughout six weeks, we'll explore her life, uncover what made her such a musical visionary, and listen to her iconic works! This six session class continues this week looking at Early Influences and Early Recordings. This week: The 1930s and early 1940s small group recordings of Billie Holiday’s rank among the most influential material ever recorded. Tonight we’ll get into the origins and explore some of the iconic moments. Join Jazz at Lincoln Center's Seton Hawkins for this deep look at one of the most influential jazz vocalists in the history of the genre.
Art & Music
|
March 8, 2021
2021-03-08
|
Live
|
10
Black Lives Matter with IndigenousX
Black Lives Matter with IndigenousX
-
Sydney Opera House
As the global Black Lives Matter protests continue, Australians have been challenged to confront the realities of ongoing racism and Aboriginal deaths in custody. Sydney Opera House has invited IndigenousX to curate this panel discussion exploring how state sanctioned violence is enabled and protected by racist ideology, and the role of protests in achieving reform. IndigenousX was founded in 2012 by Luke Pearson, as a way to help showcase and amplify a diverse range of Indigenous voices online. The project began as a rotating Twitter account, where a new Indigenous host takes over the account each week to tell their own stories, experiences and perspectives. Watch this fascinating conversation recorded live at the Sydney Opera House in June.
Culture & Politics
|
March 18, 2021
2021-03-18
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Black Reconstructions: Cities and Spatial Justice
Black Reconstructions: Cities and Spatial Justice
-
Museum of Modern Art
How do we reckon with the past to create a future? Who tells the history of your neighborhood? How do we attain spatial justice? This discussion will expand and explore questions raised in the exhibition Reconstructions: Architecture and Blackness in America by inviting the panelists and audience members to consider their positions, choices, and personal and collective power in working to protect and create Black urban spaces. This event is moderated by Ifeoma Ebo and is planned in collaboration with the BlackSpace Urbanist Collective. Audiences are encouraged read BlackSpace’s manifesto in advance of the event. Free and open to all over Zoom with advance registration.
Art & Music
|
March 29, 2021
2021-03-29
|
Live
|
FREE
Book Event: Richard Misrach on Landscape and Meaning
Book Event: Richard Misrach on Landscape and Meaning
-
The International Center of Photography
Gather with ICP and Aperture online for a conversation between photographers Richard Misrach, Meghann Reipenhoff, and Lucas Folgia on the occasion of the sixth installation of Aperture’s Photography Workshop Series, Richard Misrach on Landscape and Meaning. Led by ICP Managing Director of Programs David Campany, the photographers will discuss their creative process and approach with landscape photography, while sharing insights into the making of the book.
Film & Photography
|
March 16, 2021
2021-03-16
|
Live
|
FREE
Book Talk: How Rights Went Wrong: Why Our Obsession with Rights Is Tearing America Apart
Book Talk: How Rights Went Wrong: Why Our Obsession with Rights Is Tearing America Apart
-
Boston Athenaeum
Rights are a sacred part of American identity. Yet they were an afterthought for the Framers, and early American courts rarely enforced them. Only as a result of the racial strife that exploded during the Civil War—and a series of resulting missteps by the Supreme Court—did rights gain such outsized power. The result is a system of legal absolutism that distorts our law and debases our politics. Over and again, courts have treated rights conflicts as zero-sum games in which awarding rights to one side means denying rights to others. Eminent legal scholar Jamal Greene reveals how the explosion of rights is dividing America, and shows how we can build a better system of justice. Jamal Greene is Dwight Professor of Law at Columbia Law School. A graduate of Harvard College and Yale Law School and a former law clerk to Hon. John Paul Stevens, he was a reporter for Sports Illustrated from 1999–2002. He lives in New York City.
Reading & Writing
|
March 22, 2021
2021-03-22
|
Live
|
5
Book Talk: Sisters and Rebels: A Struggle for the Soul of America
Book Talk: Sisters and Rebels: A Struggle for the Soul of America
-
Boston Athenaeum
Descendants of a prominent slaveholding family, Elizabeth, Grace, and Katharine Lumpkin grew up in a culture of white supremacy. But while Elizabeth remained a lifelong believer, her younger sisters chose vastly different lives. Seeking their fortunes in the North, Grace and Katharine reinvented themselves as radical thinkers whose literary works and organizing efforts brought the nation’s attention to issues of region, race, and labor. In Sisters and Rebels, National Humanities Award–winning historian Jacquelyn Dowd Hall follows the divergent paths of the Lumpkin sisters, who were “estranged and yet forever entangled” by their mutual obsession with the South. Tracing the wounds and unsung victories of the past through to the contemporary moment, Hall revives a buried tradition of Southern expatriation and progressivism; explores the lost, revolutionary zeal of the early twentieth century; and muses on the fraught ties of sisterhood as the Lumpkins wrestle with orthodoxies of race, sexuality, and privilege. Jacquelyn Dowd Hall is currently Julia Cherry Spruill Professor Emerita at UNC-Chapel Hill. She was awarded a National Humanities Medal for her efforts to deepen the nation's engagement with the humanities by "recording history through the lives of ordinary people, and, in so doing,for making history." She is the author or coauthor of prizewinning books and articles, including Revolt Against Chivalry: Jessie Daniel Ames and the Women's Campaign Against Lynching (1979); Like a Family: The Making of a Southern Cotton Mill World (1987); and "The Long Civil Rights Movement and the Political Uses of the Past," Journal of American History (2005). She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and has held numerous fellowships.
Culture & Politics
|
March 17, 2021
2021-03-17
|
Live
|
5
Brine to Batteries: The Extractive Frontiers of the Global Energy Transition
Brine to Batteries: The Extractive Frontiers of the Global Energy Transition
-
Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard
Thea Riofrancos’s current project, “Brine to Batteries: The Extractive Frontiers of the Global Energy Transition,” explores the politics of the transition to renewable energy through the lens of one of its key technologies: lithium batteries. Based on multisited fieldwork following lithium’s global supply chains from the point of extraction in the Chilean desert, “Brine to Batteries” will be the first scholarly account of the rapidly moving processes shaping the contours of the next energy system—and those of our planetary future.
Culture & Politics
|
April 14, 2021
2021-04-14
|
Live
|
FREE
Bring the Heat | Chris Rochelle Live Streamed Demonstration
Bring the Heat | Chris Rochelle Live Streamed Demonstration
-
Corning Museum of Glass
In our new live demo series, Bring the Heat, gather with us for a live stream of glass artists demonstrating their expertise and skillful execution while “in the zone.” During each demo, an artist will present a personal design they’ve worked to perfect, and they will be live on the mic to narrate as they work—a rarity for live artist demonstrations and a first at the Museum. Chris Rochelle enjoys the constant, steady focus that forming glass demands. A common thread in his work is creating tight forms with clean edges and lines, which he was trained to do throughout his time as a production glassmaker.
Art & Music
|
March 10, 2021
2021-03-10
|
Live
|
FREE
Bring the Heat | Eric Meek Live Streamed Demonstration
Bring the Heat | Eric Meek Live Streamed Demonstration
-
Corning Museum of Glass
In our new live demo series, Bring the Heat, gather with us for a live stream of glass artists demonstrating their expertise and skillful execution while “in the zone.” During each demo, an artist will present a personal design they’ve worked to perfect, and they will be live on the mic to narrate as they work—a rarity for live artist demonstrations and a first at the Museum. Eric Meek has worked to become a versatile glass artist, able to execute ideas in glass with fluency in the material. When working, Meek likes to draw upon tradition and fine craftsmanship to realize modern, elegant forms.
Art & Music
|
March 24, 2021
2021-03-24
|
Live
|
FREE
Bring the Heat | George Kennard and Eric Hilton Live Streamed Demonstration
Bring the Heat | George Kennard and Eric Hilton Live Streamed Demonstration
-
Corning Museum of Glass
In our new live demo series, Bring the Heat, join us for a live steam of glass artists demonstrating their expertise and skillful execution while “in the zone.” During each demo, an artist will present a personal design they’ve worked to perfect, and they will be live on the mic to narrate as they work—a rarity for live artist demonstrations and a first at the Museum. Well-known for his fantastically large sculptures, George Kennard appreciates the limitless opportunities of manipulating molten glass. He prefers to create massive incalmo works by joining two blown glass bubbles to make different bands of color, and has worked with teams of up to 10 glassblowers to create some of his most notable large-scale works. Eric Hilton was a designer at Steuben Glass for over 20 years and has exhibited his sculpture in museums around the world. His awards include both an NEA fellowship and grant for architectural research.
Art & Music
|
April 7, 2021
2021-04-07
|
Live
|
FREE
Brooklyn Tastes with Love, Nelly
Brooklyn Tastes with Love, Nelly
-
Brooklyn Museum
Celebrate Women’s History Month and support women-run businesses with a virtual cooking class hosted by our friends at Ocean Hill bakery Love, Nelly. We’ll take a close look at the artwork of feminist artist Roser Bru, whose engravings and etchings are featured in our collection. Then, learn to make a triple-layered cookie bar inspired by Bru’s work Trocados, with bakers Stephanie Gallardo and Keavy Landreth, and close out the evening with a toasted coconut cocktail pairing provided by Haley Traub, head bartender at Attaboy. Tickets include an ingredient list, so you can follow along and make the recipe at home. (And if you are local, you can support Love, Nelly and get the ingredients delivered right to your door by purchasing their monthly care package!) Tickets are $10; a Zoom link will be emailed upon confirmation. Member tickets are $5. Not a Member? Join today! To guarantee timely delivery, please order your care package by March 5. Tickets also include a code for free Museum admission, to use at your convenience, once the Brooklyn Museum reopens. We can’t wait to see you in person!
Food & Drink
|
March 11, 2021
2021-03-11
|
Live
|
10
By George! The Life and Music of George Gershwin
By George! The Life and Music of George Gershwin
-
Johns Hopkins University Odyssey Program
In this course, pianist and educator Daniel Weiser will explore the tragically short, but incredibly productive life of America's greatest composer. The son of Russian Jewish immigrants, Gershwin grew up in the rough, chaotic streets of New York and soaked up the melting pot around him to help formulate the new, brash sound of America. Combining elements of "Jewish" music with the "Blues" and "Ragtime" brought by recent black migrants from the South, Gershwin would help produce the new "Jazz" that would soon help make New York City a new center for musical culture. Gershwin seamlessly moved between the "classical" and "popular" worlds to help obscure some of the more overt differences between them. Over four classes, Dr. Weiser will play much of Gershwin's concert music, including "Rhapsody in Blue," "An American in Paris," and his "Preludes." He will also perform many of his iconic songs, most written with his brother Ira, as well as his obscure early opera, "Blue Monday."
Art & Music
|
May 5, 2021
2021-05-05
|
Live
|
140
CCAM Sound Art Series: Victoria Shen
CCAM Sound Art Series: Victoria Shen
-
Yale University
For the second event in the Spring 2021 Yale CCAM Sound Art Series we are excited to welcome Victoria Shen! Victoria Shen is an experimental music performer, sound artist, instrument-maker, and designer of electronic wearables based in San Francisco. Though analog synthesizers are the backbone of Shen’s music, while performing live, she plays self-made electronics, invented instruments, and acoustic objects such as a bullwhip. A tightrope walk between control and chance, the whiff of danger is never far during Shen’s performances. Her sound is dynamic with a sensitivity to texture and structure throughout. She will give a talk about her work, addressing such topics as the conceptual underpinnings of her sound practice, the relationship between art and technology, Modernism and sound, Signal vs. Noise and how the interface between the two can provide insights into the production of meaning. She will also discuss survey of different work she has made including installations, wearables, and her recorded output under her stage-name, Evicshen. This will be followed by a Q&A with the audience.
Art & Music
|
March 11, 2021
2021-03-11
|
Live
|
FREE
CITY HALL: A Discussion with Director Frederick Wiseman
CITY HALL: A Discussion with Director Frederick Wiseman
-
Brown University
Join us for a discussion with Frederick Wiseman, director of CITY HALL. Moderated by Edward Steinfeld, director of the Watson Institute. About the film: City government touches almost every aspect of our lives. Most of us are unaware of or take for granted these necessary services such as police, fire, sanitation, veterans affairs, elder support, parks, licensing of various professional activities, recordkeeping of birth, marriage and death as well as hundreds of other activities that support a city’s residents, businesses and visitors. CITY HALL, by Frederick Wiseman, shows the efforts by Boston city government to provide these services. The film also illustrates the variety of ways the city administration enters into civil discourse with the citizens of Boston. Mayor Martin J. Walsh and his administration are presented addressing a number of their policy priorities which include racial justice, affordable housing, climate action, and homelessness. CITY HALL shows a city government successfully offering a wide variety of services to a diverse population. To watch the film CITY HALL in advance, register on the event page.
Film & Photography
|
March 10, 2021
2021-03-10
|
Live
|
FREE
CSAS Film Series | Covid Response: A Himalayan Story
CSAS Film Series | Covid Response: A Himalayan Story
-
The University of Michigan
Covid response is a documentary on the ongoing global pandemic and how it affects a remote Himalayan state in India. The film is a critical look at the various ways in which people’s suffering- mental, physical and financial, have been worsened by the novel coronavirus. Munmun Dhalaria is an independent filmmaker and National Geographic Storytelling Explorer, mainly focused on wildlife conservation, gender, science communication and human rights. She deals with her own sense of solastalgia by revealing unseen places and untold stories of people’s perseverance to protect our natural world. Prior to the talk with Munmun Dhalaria, the documentary will be available for viewing online from Monday 3/8 until Sunday 3/14. To view it, please register here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScu86F5Wjp0nWML3LSPak9wRyVKSG4rSt2Txm2QIL74bQYY5Q/viewform
Film & Photography
|
March 11, 2021
2021-03-11
|
Live
|
FREE
Café Conversation Online
Café Conversation Online
-
Alliance Francaise SF
Do you remember our Cafe’Conversation event ? A screen shouldn’t keep us from chatting and sharing a coffee together! Every month, we invite you to talk on a different theme. Everybody will be able to debate and speak about it. This week: French expression!
Culture & Politics
|
March 26, 2021
2021-03-26
|
Live
|
10
Can Broadway Boom Again After COVID-19?
Can Broadway Boom Again After COVID-19?
-
The New Yorker
In this New Yorker virtual discussion, actors, directors, and stagehands come together to keep the heart of the city alive while awaiting a physical return to the Broadway stage. Recorded the last week of August, 2020.
Art & Music
|
March 13, 2021
2021-03-13
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Can Morality Be Built into Computers?
Can Morality Be Built into Computers?
-
National Humanities Center
As part of "In Our Image: Artificial Intelligence and the Humanities," a virtual conference exploring the critical intersection between the humanities and artificial intelligence, gather with us for a panel discussion featuring Robert D. Newman, Moderator, President and Director, National Humanities Center; Chetan Dube, CEO, IP Soft; David Theo Goldberg, Director, University of California Humanities Research Institute; Elizabeth Langland, Director, Lincoln Center for Applied Ethics, Arizona State University; and Meredith Broussard, Professor of Data Journalism, New York University.
Culture & Politics
|
April 15, 2021
2021-04-15
|
Live
|
FREE
Can Robust Free Speech Co-Exist with the Fight for Justice?
Can Robust Free Speech Co-Exist with the Fight for Justice?
-
Aspen Institute
It’s a complicated and confusing time for the idea of free speech. On the one hand, tens of thousands of people have taken to the streets in recent months, exercising their rights to free speech in defense of justice, equality, and a more inclusive America. In some cases, however, they’ve been met with military-style police crackdowns. Meanwhile, hate speech and disinformation proliferate online about everything from COVID-19 to the 2020 election. And while some might argue that there’s never been a wider variety of opinions in the ether, others argue that a culture of silencing or cancelling unpopular or offensive speech is threatening to narrow the boundaries of American discourse. Is there a middle ground in these divided times? Can we protect free thinking while promoting a more inclusive culture and protecting against the harms of speech? PEN America CEO Suzanne Nossel thinks we can. She joined Vivian Schiller, head of Aspen Digital, to talk about her new book Dare to Speak.
Culture & Politics
|
March 12, 2021
2021-03-12
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Chagall: The Quintessential Jewish Artist of the 20th Century
Chagall: The Quintessential Jewish Artist of the 20th Century
-
92nd Street Y
Marc Chagall was a Russian-French artist who worked in a variety of media but is most renowned for his paintings. During his time, he was the foremost Jewish artist in the world and has since been referred to as “the quintessential Jewish artist of the twentieth century.” Chagall is most known for his vibrant use of color to attract the viewer’s attention. His artworks are usually lively and imaginative and often combine Cubism and Fauvism with his folkish style. This lecture will cover his most iconic works. We will explore how the places he lived, his personal background and current events impacted his art.
Art & Music
|
April 16, 2021
2021-04-16
|
Live
|
20
Chanda Prescod-Weinstein in Conversation With Elissa Washuta
Chanda Prescod-Weinstein in Conversation With Elissa Washuta
-
Powell's City of Books
From a star theoretical physicist comes a journey into the world of particle physics and the cosmos — and a call for a more just practice of science. In The Disordered Cosmos (Bold Type Books), Dr. Chanda Prescod-Weinstein shares her love for physics, from the Standard Model of Particle Physics and what lies beyond it, to the physics of melanin in skin, to the latest theories of dark matter — all with a new spin informed by history, politics, and the wisdom of Star Trek. One of the leading physicists of her generation, Prescod-Weinstein is also one of fewer than 100 Black American women to earn a PhD from a department of physics. Her vision of the cosmos is vibrant, buoyantly non-traditional, and grounded in Black feminist traditions. Prescod-Weinstein urges us to recognize how science, like most fields, is rife with racism, sexism, and other dehumanizing systems. She lays out a bold new approach to science and society that begins with the belief that we all have a fundamental right to know and love the night sky. The Disordered Cosmos dreams into existence a world that allows everyone to experience and understand the wonders of the universe. Prescod-Weinstein will be joined in conversation by Elissa Washuta, author of My Body Is a Book of Rules and editor of Shapes of Native Nonfiction: Collected Essays by Contemporary Writers.
Reading & Writing
|
March 17, 2021
2021-03-17
|
Live
|
FREE
City by City
City by City
-
The National Gallery
Jo Walton explores the art of Italy's Renaissance cities in this course of six introductory talks. Each session lasts for 2 hours, with a 10-minute break at the mid-point. There will be time for questions. An optional non-assessed homework is offered on a weekly basis. This typically involves looking closely at a painting to reflect on set questions. Live from London, these classes run from 10am-12pm Eastern Time in the US. About the instructor: Jo Walton has been lecturing for The Arts Society for over fifteen years, specialising in the art and architecture of the Italian Renaissance, as well as aspects of British 20th-century painting. She has also worked extensively with The Friends of Dulwich Picture Gallery, The Art Fund and local art groups around the UK. She was a guide at Tate Britain and Tate Modern for over a decade.
Art & Music
|
March 15, 2021
2021-03-15
|
Live
|
https://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/events/course-city-by-city-2021
City of the Centuries: A History of Chicago
City of the Centuries: A History of Chicago
-
University of Chicago Graham School
This discussion/lecture course will focus on the whole history of Chicago, from its origins to the present, emphasizing the major events, politics, and peoples that make up one of the most culturally diverse cities in the world.
Culture & Politics
|
June 21, 2021
2021-06-21
|
Live
|
$425
Classic and Modern Home Cooking
Classic and Modern Home Cooking
-
92nd Street Y
Passionate home cooks and bakers are loving this new virtual series developed in collaboration with our friends at New York City’s renowned Kitchen Arts and Letters bookstore. Each week, prior to meeting online, everyone cooks the same recipes from one of our four featured cookbooks. Beloved cooking teacher Annette Tomei offers background, guidance, and tips. You master some sensational new recipes and skills and have fun discussing it all, gaining inspiration, and sharing experiences with others who love cooking as much as you do. Featured in this session are two of spring’s hottest new releases, the debut cookbook from the wildly popular NYT Cooking, and an eagerly awaited new volume on simple but sublime French cooking, along with landmark culinary classics from Julie Sahni and Edna Lewis that every home chef must have. Cook simply, cook French, cook Indian, cook Southern, cook with us! The cookbooks: No-Recipe Recipes from The New York Times’ Sam Sifton — the debut cookbook based on NYT Cooking; Classic Indian Cooking — Julie Sahni’s seminal book on Indian cuisine; Plat du Jour: French Dinners Made Easy — from award-winning journalist, French food expert and cooking school proprietor Susan Loomis; and The Taste of Country Cooking — the legendary Edna Lewis’ masterpiece of Southern cooking. Registration includes a copy of each of the four books, which will be shipped directly to you. Class will take place on Tuesdays, March 16, March 30, April 13, and April 27 from 7-8:30 pm ET.
Food & Drink
|
March 16, 2021
2021-03-16
|
Live
|
250
Climate & Change: Landscapes of the Future with Daan Roosegaarde
Climate & Change: Landscapes of the Future with Daan Roosegaarde
-
Museum of Design Atlanta
What are the landscapes of the future? How do we design a future with clean air, clean water, clean energy, and clean space? Gather with us for a talk by speculative architect and artist Daan Roosegaarde, founder of Studio Roosegaarde, a team of designers and engineers that create projects at the intersection of art and technology such as WATERLICHT (a virtual flood showing the power of water), SMOG FREE PROJECT (the world's first largest outdoor air purifier which turns smog into jewellery), SMART HIGHWAY (roads that charge throughout the day and glow at night), SPACE WASTE LAB (visualising and upcycling space waste), and VAN GOGH BIKE PATH (a light-emitting bicycle path which glows at night and was inspired by Vincent Van Gogh's Starry Night).
Art & Music
|
March 20, 2021
2021-03-20
|
Live
|
FREE
Code Breaker: Walter Isaacson on Jennifer Doudna
Code Breaker: Walter Isaacson on Jennifer Doudna
-
Chicago Humanities Festival
Walter Isaacson—the acclaimed biographer of Steve Jobs, Leonardo da Vinci, Albert Einstein, and Benjamin Franklin—turns his pen to another transformative figure: Jennifer Doudna, the Nobel Prize-winning creator of the gene editing technology CRISPR. Code Breaker explores the medical miracles Doudna’s scientific discoveries have made possible and the moral questions they pose. Isaacson is joined at CHF by WBEZ’s Chief Content Officer Steve Edwards to discuss Doudna’s inspiring career, gene editing, and how new inventions affect the future of humanity. General Audience tickets are $38, which includes access to the virtual event and a signed copy of The Code Breaker shipped directly to your door (U.S. addresses only). ALL tickets must be purchased online via Seminary Co-op directly. Phone orders or email requests cannot be accepted. This event will be livestreamed on March 11th at 7pm central time. Registered guests will receive a link to access the program from the Chicago Humanities Festival via email on the day of the event at the email address you used to make your purchase.
Reading & Writing
|
March 11, 2021
2021-03-11
|
Live
|
38
Cole Porter: Sophisticate of American Song
Cole Porter: Sophisticate of American Song
-
Smithsonian Institution
Dilletante…hedonist…elitist…snob. Cole Porter was called many things over the course of his creative but troubled life. No matter how he was perceived, his reputation as a musical genius has never been questioned. That life can be divided into two distinct parts: before Porter’s debilitating riding accident in 1937 and after. Unlike contemporaries Jerome Kern, George Gershwin, and Irving Berlin, Porter did not seek Broadway success during his early years, living what was very much a life of privilege. Eventually he did manage to balance a personal and professional life as he entered his 30s, epitomized by the 1934 blockbuster Anything Goes. After his injury, he produced some of his finest shows, including Kiss Me Kate, Can- Can, and Silk Stockings. His indomitable work ethic and his insistence on enjoying life clearly enlivened his music: He wove the emotions and mores of his generation into lyrics whose words were provocative, erotic, exotic, and always much more than clever in songs like “Night and Day,” “Begin the Beguine,” and “I Love Paris”. American music specialist Robert Wyatt travels through Porter’s life on Broadway and in Hollywood, 40 years that produced 33 stage works and the music for 23 films. Rare archival film clips and recordings of original cast members, including Ethel Merman, Fred Astaire, Louis Armstrong, and Bing Crosby are featured, along with Porter himself singing and playing “You’re the Top”—which he was.
Art & Music
|
March 16, 2021
2021-03-16
|
Live
|
30
Collections Tour: The Mammalogy Antler Room
Collections Tour: The Mammalogy Antler Room
-
California Academy of Sciences
Collections manager Moe Flannery takes viewers behind the scenes of our mammalogy collections to explore some of the most impressive specimens of the Academy's entire, 46-million-specimen scientific holdings. See a complete dugong skeleton, a pair of deer locked in mortal combat, orca skulls, narwhal tusks, lots (and lots) of horns and antlers, and so much more. Those who caught Moe's first behind-the-scenes tour know exactly how fascinating this will be—don't miss it!
Science & Nature
|
March 25, 2021
2021-03-25
|
Live
|
FREE
Colored Pencils for Beginners
Colored Pencils for Beginners
-
92nd Street Y
Discover this medium that is surprisingly versatile and perfect for the home studio. This is one of our most popular Gather classes. No experience necessary, not a ton of supplies needed, and something to help you unleash a little creativity while learning some art-making skills. You’ll learn how to use colored pencils to create vibrant drawings from life with nuance, depth, and expression. Learn basic techniques for blending, shading, and more in this beginner-friendly course.
Art & Music
|
March 22, 2021
2021-03-22
|
Live
|
190
Continue the Conversation: Clodion's "Zephyrus and Flora"
Continue the Conversation: Clodion's "Zephyrus and Flora"
-
The Frick Collection
Join fellow art enthusiasts online in a participatory conversation focused on a single masterpiece. Frick educators lead these thoughtful and sustained dialogues in real time. Space is limited and active participation is strongly encouraged. Sessions are live and not recorded. Instructions for joining through Zoom will be provided in an email to registered participants 1–2 days in advance. A reminder email with a link to a high-resolution image of the work of art will be sent a few hours before the program begins. Participants may also call in over the phone while viewing the work of art separately online. Participants admitted from the waitlist may receive information closer to the program start time, depending on cancellations.
Art & Music
|
March 17, 2021
2021-03-17
|
Live
|
FREE
Conversation on "Hillbilly Elegy": Director Ron Howard & Author J.D. Vance
Conversation on "Hillbilly Elegy": Director Ron Howard & Author J.D. Vance
-
Library of Congress
The Library and Netflix will host a conversation with film director Ron Howard and J.D. Vance, author of “Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis,” moderated by Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden to discuss the creative process of bringing the book to the screen with the release of the new film, “Hillbilly Elegy.” Based on J.D. Vance’s New York Times Bestseller, directed by Academy Award winner Ron Howard and produced by Academy Award winner Brian Grazer, “Hillbilly Elegy” is a powerful personal memoir that offers a window into one family’s personal journey. By following three colorful generations through their unique struggles, J.D.’s family story explores the highs and lows that define his family’s experience.
Film & Photography
|
March 11, 2021
2021-03-11
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Conversation with Composer Angélica Negrón
Conversation with Composer Angélica Negrón
-
Princeton University
Puerto Rican-born composer and multi-instrumentalist Angélica Negrón writes music for accordions, robotic instruments, toys and electronics as well as chamber ensembles and orchestras. Her music has been described as “wistfully idiosyncratic and contemplative” (WQXR/Q2) and “mesmerizing and affecting” (Feast of Music) while The New York Times noted her “capacity to surprise” and her “quirky approach to scoring”. Angélica has been commissioned by the Bang on a Can All-Stars, loadbang, MATA Festival, Brooklyn Youth Chorus, Sō Percussion, the American Composers Orchestra, and the New York Botanical Garden, among others. Her music has been performed at the Kennedy Center, the Ecstatic Music Festival, EMPAC, Bang on a Can Marathon and the 2016 New York Philharmonic Biennial and her film scores have been heard numerous times at the Tribeca Film Festival. She has collaborated with artists like Sō Percussion, The Knights, Face the Music, and NOVUS NY, among others and is a founding member of the tropical electronic band Balún. Angélica holds a Master’s degree in music composition from New York University and pursued doctoral studies at The Graduate Center (CUNY) under the guidance of Tania León. She's a teaching artist for New York Philharmonic's Very Young Composers Program working with young learners on creative composition projects. Upcoming premieres include works for the LA Philharmonic, Dallas Symphony Orchestra and National Symphony Orchestra, San Francisco Girls Chorus, and NY Philharmonic Project 19 initiative. Negrón continues to perform and compose for film.
Art & Music
|
March 18, 2021
2021-03-18
|
Live
|
FREE
Conversation with Composer Tomeka Reid
Conversation with Composer Tomeka Reid
-
Princeton University
Described as a “New Jazz Power Source” by the New York Times, cellist and composer Tomeka Reid has emerged as one of the most original, versatile, and curious musicians in Chicago’s bustling jazz and improvised music community over the last decade. Her distinctive melodic sensibility, always rooted in a strong sense of groove, has been featured in many distinguished ensembles over the years. Reid released her debut recording as a bandleader in 2015, with the Tomeka Reid Quartet, a vibrant showcase for the cellist’s improvisational acumen as well as her dynamic arrangements and compositional ability. The quartet’s second album, Old New, released in Oct 2019 on Cuneiform Records, has been described as “fresh and transformative—its songs striking out in bold, lyrical directions with plenty of Reid’s singularly elegant yet energetic and sharp-edged bow work.” Another reviewer noted that “while Reid’s compositional and technical gifts transcend jazz, they exemplify the tradition wondrously.”
Art & Music
|
March 11, 2021
2021-03-11
|
Live
|
FREE
Conversatory on Racism: Making Hispanics with Cristina Mora
Conversatory on Racism: Making Hispanics with Cristina Mora
-
The Fromm Institute
The Fromm Institute invites you to conversations of ideas, views and experiences on the topic of Racism in the United States. Addressing a different aspect of Racism each week, join Fromm Institute Professor Mara Kolesas in a conversation with guest speakers followed by a question and answer period with attendees. Each conversatory is designed to build on the others, however attendance at prior conversatories is not required. All events are free and open to the public, but attendance is limited. This session: Making Hispanics. G. Cristina Mora is Associate Professor of Sociology and Chicano/Latino Studies and the Co-Director of the Institute of Governmental Studies at UC Berkeley. She completed her B.A. in Sociology at Cal in 2003 and earned her PhD in Sociology from Princeton University in 2009. Her research focuses mainly on questions of census racial classification, immigration, and racial politics in the United States and Europe. Her book, Making Hispanics, was published by the University of Chicago Press and provides the first historical account of the rise of the “Hispanic/Latino” panethnic category in the United States. This work has received several awards and wide recognition, and has also been the subject of numerous national media segments. In April of 2020, Professor Mora helped to oversee the largest survey on Covid-19 and racial disparities in California. She is currently writing a book on immigration attitudes and racial politics California.
Culture & Politics
|
March 19, 2021
2021-03-19
|
Live
|
FREE
Craftivism 101 with Bad Ass Cross Stitch - Sisters Are Doin’ It For Themselves!
Craftivism 101 with Bad Ass Cross Stitch - Sisters Are Doin’ It For Themselves!
-
Museum of Design Atlanta
Gather with us as MODA joins forces with Badass Cross Stitch, aka Shannon Downey, to offer free Craftivism 101 classes every month. In March, we’ll be working on projects highlighting the many ways in which Sisters Are Doin’ It For Themselves! Get acquainted with craftivism, learn to embroider, stitch something brilliant, and make friends—all in just 2 hours! Craft-based activism has been used as a tool of resistance, coalition building, and even espionage! Learn from Shannon Downey, a leader in the modern craftivism movement. She will provide an introduction to craftivism, teach you how to embroider, and have you stabbing it out in no time. She guarantees you'll walk away feeling better than when you logged in. This event is free, but you must register in advance to receive the Zoom login details. The ideal supply list includes: embroidery hoop; cotton fabric in light colors; 22 gauge tapestry needle; embroidery floss; scissors; water soluble marking pen; and, if you want, an embroidery pattern (not a cross stitch pattern).
Art & Music
|
March 17, 2021
2021-03-17
|
Live
|
FREE
Craftivism 101 with Badass Cross Stitch: Craftivists at War!
Craftivism 101 with Badass Cross Stitch: Craftivists at War!
-
Museum of Design Atlanta
Gather with us as MODA joins forces with Badass Cross Stitch, aka Shannon Downey, to offer free Craftivism 101 classes every month. In April, we’ll be working on projects to celebrate the birthday of a legendary (and truly badass) wartime craftivist, Phyllis LaTour Doyle! Get acquainted with craftivism, learn to embroider, stitch something brilliant, and make friends—all in just 2 hours! Craft-based activism has been used as a tool of resistance, coalition building, and even espionage! Learn from Shannon Downey, a leader in the modern craftivism movement. She will provide an introduction to craftivism, teach you how to embroider, and have you stabbing it out in no time. She guarantees you'll walk away feeling better than when you logged in. This event is free, but you must register in advance to receive the Zoom login details. The ideal supply list includes: embroidery hoop; cotton fabric in light colors; 22 gauge tapestry needle; embroidery floss; scissors; water soluble marking pen; and, if you want, an embroidery pattern (not a cross stitch pattern).
Art & Music
|
April 21, 2021
2021-04-21
|
Live
|
FREE
Creative Sketchbooking
Creative Sketchbooking
-
Cleveland Museum of Art
In this virtual class, participants will find inspiration in their surroundings while exploring creative ideas and transforming them into sketchbooks. Participants will learn about the sketchbooks in the Cleveland Museum of Art’s collection online, bind their own sketchbooks, and build their own artistic confidence. Participants will explore different types of content with creative exercises and prompts and learn different techniques such as mixed media, drawing, and hand-lettering. Open to all levels of experience. Participants must provide their own supplies (list available on registration page). Class is conducted via Zoom.
Art & Music
|
March 11, 2021
2021-03-11
|
Live
|
120
Date Night Done Right: Spring
Date Night Done Right: Spring
-
18 Reasons
What can you say for a certainty in these topsy-turvy times? Here’s a thing: giving another person food is a profound and touching gift. Here’s another: date nights are already fraught with stress and the potential to go awry. Why not let 18 Reasons steer you through the pitfalls and set you up for a wonderful, loving, gift of a meal, to share with a deserving person of your choice? We will grill up your choice of wonderful Spring lamb chops or hearty beef, drizzled with the fresh excitement of chimichurri sauce. Deeply rich and wonderful fondant potatoes alongside, and buttery spears of asparagus. Just to add a bit of zing, we are pouring an Old Pepper cocktail, whiskey and lemon and hot sauce to add a little spice to the evening. Tonight's menu: Pan-Seared Lamb Chops/Steaks, Chimichurri Sauce; Buttered Asparagus, Fondant Potatoes; and Old Pepper Cocktail.
Food & Drink
|
April 23, 2021
2021-04-23
|
Live
|
$50
Defending Media Freedom in Taiwan
Defending Media Freedom in Taiwan
-
Stanford Hoover Institution
In December 2020, Taiwan’s National Communications Commission voted to deny a broadcast license to CTiTV, a pro-China news channel that had been highly critical of the Taiwanese government and ruling party, the DPP. This decision marks the first time a TV channel has been forced off the air for violation of the terms of its license since Taiwan became a democracy. CTiTV is part of the Want Want China Times group, a media conglomerate owned and run by the pro-unification snack foods magnate Tsai Eng-meng, and it has been accused of coordinating its reporting with the Taiwan Affairs Office in Beijing. However, until being forced off the air, it was also a popular source of news among supporters of the opposition KMT and an important voice in Taiwan’s diverse and critical TV landscape. In this moderated discussion, three panelists from Taiwan will consider the complex issues this decision raises and debate when — and if — it is ever appropriate for government to regulate media content and limit access to the broadcast spectrum in a liberal democracy.
Culture & Politics
|
March 18, 2021
2021-03-18
|
Live
|
FREE
Design = Change: Georgia Tech on Designing the Dart Electric Ride Share Bike
Design = Change: Georgia Tech on Designing the Dart Electric Ride Share Bike
-
Museum of Design Atlanta
In 2020, Georgia Tech Industrial Design students Victoria Chiang, Francis Lin, and Nico Hitson set out to design an innovative electric ride-share bike. They noticed that existing ride-share bikes were designed for utility, with less consideration for comfort, speed, and aesthetics. Their goal was to make the ride-share bike thrilling to ride and more aesthetically appealing. To that end, the team created the Dart Electric Ride-Share Bike, which won a Gold Medal for Student Design from the Industrial Design Society of America. It has an electric hub motor that gives riders an extra power boost, allowing them to speed over difficult urban terrain and arrive at work sweat-free. Adjustable handlebars give riders the option to switch to a leaning position while pedaling hills. And, the bike is stylish! Gather with us for a conversation with the designers of the Dart Electric Ride-Share Bike! We'll talk about their process, the bike they designed, and their hopes that it might encourage people to incorporate cycling into their lifestyle.
Art & Music
|
March 13, 2021
2021-03-13
|
Live
|
5
Design for All: Sarah Schleuning on speechless: different by design
Design for All: Sarah Schleuning on speechless: different by design
-
Museum of Design Atlanta
How might we curate and design exhibitions that multisensory, interactive, and immersive experiences for visitors of all backgrounds and abilities? Gather with MODA and Connections School of Atlanta, a neurodiverse high school, for a discussion about this top with Sarah Schleuning, Interim Chief Curator and Margot B. Perot Senior Curator of Decorative Arts and Design at the Dallas Museum of Art (DMA) and former Curator of Design & Decorative Arts at the High Museum. Schleuning was the curator of the groundbreaking exhibition, speechless: different by design, an innovative project that premiered at the DMA in November 2020. The pioneering show merged research, aesthetics, and innovative new design to explore the vast spectrum of sensory experiences and new approaches to accessibility and modes of communication in the museum setting. The exhibition was inspired by Sarah's now 6-year-old son Vaughn who has an expressive language disorder. speechless: different by design debuted new work by six leading and emerging international designers and design teams whose projects were informed by conversations with specialists from prominent academic and medical institutions. Their site-specific installations and new commissions created participatory environments and distinct situations in which senses merged or were substituted for one another. The exhibition aimed to blur the boundaries between senses, media, disciplines, and environments and encouraged visitors to interact and communicate through design.
Art & Music
|
March 30, 2021
2021-03-30
|
Live
|
FREE
Design for Justice: Design is Ceremony
Design for Justice: Design is Ceremony
-
Museum of Design Atlanta
During this virtual lecture, titled Design as Ceremony, Chris Cornelius of studio:indigenous will speak about how he incorporates timeless indigenous values into contemporary architecture. Chris’s work posits indigenous design thinking as a tool to dismantle the apparatus of colonization. Specifically, Chris will speak about how his recent architectural installations serve as indigenous land acknowledgements.
Art & Music
|
April 7, 2021
2021-04-07
|
Live
|
FREE
Desktop Dialogue: An Art Anthology, Chapter One
Desktop Dialogue: An Art Anthology, Chapter One
-
Cleveland Museum of Art
How many stories can a work of art tell? The series An Art Anthology, accompanies the CMA exhibition Stories from Storage. Developed in collaboration with the creative writing organization Literary Cleveland, the series invites four local storytellers to offer artful interpretations of select objects on view in the show. For the first chapter, playwright Eric Coble (The Velocity of Autumn, Bright Ideas) draws from photographs of popular tourist locales to create the dramatic monologue “That Which Can Be Held.” Watch Coble’s live performance and, afterward, join him and curator Barbara Tannenbaum for a conversation about the fantasy and romance of travel in images and spoken word.
Art & Music
|
March 17, 2021
2021-03-17
|
Live
|
FREE
Dickens's Masterpiece: David Copperfield
Dickens's Masterpiece: David Copperfield
-
Stanford Continuing Studies
Dickens confessed to having a "favorite child" among his novels, and critics have largely agreed, calling David Copperfield his masterpiece and his triumph. It is also the most autobiographical of Dickens's novels—a story about coming of age, ambition, family, and second chances. Much like Dickens himself, David shows promise as a young child but is taken out of school and put to work in a factory. In what has become one of the most famous pilgrimages in literary history, the young David sets out without money, parents, or prospects to search for his aunt, a woman he knows only through his mother’s memory. And this journey serves as a microcosm of the larger quest David embarks on as he sets out to become, like Dickens, a great author. Along the way, David meets some of the most memorable supporting-cast members in all of Dickens’s work: Betsey Trotwood, Uriah Heep, and Wilkins Micawber. In this course, we will read Dickens's novel while situating it in its biographical, historical, and cultural context. We will consider how Dickens made the genre of the bildungsroman, or coming-of-age novel, his own. Turning to Dickens's role as a social critic, we will consider how his portrayals of Victorian work, education, family, empire, and gender roles (especially the figure of the "fallen woman”) speak to our contemporary debates.
Reading & Writing
|
April 21, 2021
2021-04-21
|
Live
|
360
Digital Agriculture: New Frontiers for the Food System
Digital Agriculture: New Frontiers for the Food System
-
The World Bank
Rising food insecurity and malnutrition, combined with high food loss and waste, agricultural pollution and persistent poverty, show that the world’s food system is not fit for purpose—and COVID-19 has only worsened existing fault lines in the food and agriculture sector. The ongoing digital revolution could be transformative for food and agriculture, and create more efficient, equitable, and environmentally sustainable ways to feed the world. Gather with us for Digital Agriculture: New Frontiers for the Food System, a dynamic event with food tech innovators and leaders from the private and public sector who will explore the transformational potential of digital agriculture to feed the world in a way that delivers healthier people, healthier economies and a healthier planet.
Culture & Politics
|
March 17, 2021
2021-03-17
|
Live
|
FREE
Drawing Together: Manet
Drawing Together: Manet
-
The Frick Collection
Join us for a new online drawing program that centers mindfulness and community. Each session begins with short drawing warm-ups, followed by a close look at a work of art for inspiration and open-ended art-making prompts. Drawing Together provides a space to make and share in the company of others, welcoming everyone with an interest in cultivating their creativity. No art background is required. Instructions for joining through Zoom, as well as the prompts and works of art, will be provided in an email to registered participants 1–2 days in advance.
Art & Music
|
March 9, 2021
2021-03-09
|
Live
|
FREE
Drawing Together: Vermeer
Drawing Together: Vermeer
-
The Frick Collection
Join us for an online drawing program that centers mindfulness and community. Each session begins with short drawing warm-ups, followed by a close look at a work of art for inspiration and open-ended art-making prompts. Drawing Together provides a space to make and share in the company of others, welcoming everyone with an interest in cultivating their creativity. No art background is required. Instructions for joining through Zoom, as well as the prompts and works of art, will be provided in an email to registered participants 1–2 days in advance. Space limited, so sign-up soon!
Art & Music
|
April 20, 2021
2021-04-20
|
Live
|
FREE
Drawing for Beginners
Drawing for Beginners
-
92nd Street Y
This class focuses on the basics of drawing with pencil, eraser, and paper. Expert teachers guide students through the elements of art, including line, shape, shadow, value, tone, form and perspective, demonstrating and offering critiques of work. This course is ideal for beginner and intermediate-level students who seek a foundation in the fundamentals of drawing.
Art & Music
|
March 9, 2021
2021-03-09
|
Live
|
155
Egyptian Mummies: New Approaches and Latest Discoveries
Egyptian Mummies: New Approaches and Latest Discoveries
-
Royal Ontario Museum
Ancient mummies have been a source of public fascination and a focus of global scientific inquiry for over 200 years. Hear from British Museum researchers Marie Vandenbeusch and Daniel Antoine as they explore the ROM's special exhibition Egyptian Mummies: Ancient Lives. New Discoveries., where digital imaging was used to examine mummified remains without damaging or disturbing them. Find out how this approach shed light on the stories behind six mummies, including a temple singer, a child from the Roman era and a priest.
Science & Nature
|
March 11, 2021
2021-03-11
|
Live
|
FREE
Ensuring the Equitable and Effective Global Distribution of Vaccines
Ensuring the Equitable and Effective Global Distribution of Vaccines
-
Aspen Institute
COVID-19 is exposing deep inequities in health systems worldwide. A COVID-19 vaccine promises to tame a pandemic that has sickened more than 35 million people globally, left millions without work, and cost national economies trillions. How do we ensure the vaccine development and distribution process is unhindered by domestic and international geopolitics? Join the Global Inclusive Growth Partnership (GIGP), an Aspen Institute collaboration with the Mastercard Center for Inclusive Growth, and the Aspen Global Innovators Group for a conversation with: Kathleen Sebelius, Former US Secretary Health and Human Services; Mike Froman, Vice Chairman, Mastercard; Anita Zaidi, Director, Vaccine Development, Surveillance, and Enteric and Diarrheal Diseases Programs, The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; Marie-Ange Saraka-Yao, Managing Director, Resource Mobilisation, Private Sector Partnerships and Innovative Finance, GAVI. This conversation will be moderated by Elizabeth Cohen a senior medical correspondent for CNN's Health, Medical and Wellness unit, reporting breaking medical news and health consumer reporting on CNN and CNN.com.
Science & Nature
|
March 18, 2021
2021-03-18
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Exceptional Essentials: Asparagus
Exceptional Essentials: Asparagus
-
18 Reasons
The first and deepest joy of Spring: long tender shoots of delicious asparagus, crowned in glory and reaching for the sun, brought to our Winter-starved tables with blessings of green! Come join Chef Mike at 18 Reasons as we celebrate the longed-for shoot, with dishes simple and impressive. We will make a celebratory risotto of asparagus and spring peas, verdant and alive with the flavors of spring, and celebrate the explosion of flavor and arrival that is asparagus with a goats’ cheese and asparagus souffle. Have your camera in one hand, your fork in the other. We are here to celebrate the Spring! This class menu includes: Asparagus and Spring Pea Risotto; and Asparagus and Goats Cheese Soufflé.
Food & Drink
|
March 30, 2021
2021-03-30
|
Live
|
$50
Exceptional Essentials: Eggs 2
Exceptional Essentials: Eggs 2
-
18 Reasons
The return of the perfect food! Come join 18 Reasons as we do even more things with the incredible, edible, versatile, and not-so-fragile egg! We are going to do shirred eggs this time, the perfect fuzzy-edges way to make a Sunday breakfast. Crack an egg into a ramekin with some mushrooms and asparagus, call it “en cocotte” if you need to impress! Next, a wobbly tender savory flan, sweet and richly flavored with roasted garlic. Served as an appetizer with a handful of charred toasts to spread it on. Then a twist on a classic, with the single best picnic item ever created - changed up to reflect our modern approach. We are going to make Scotch eggs, but wrap our oozy yolk eggs with the best possible chorizo, deep fry them and serve them on bright and spicy salsa verde! A treat indeed, one for tonight, and the Scotch juevos and salsa verde are set up to cook tomorrow! This class menu includes: Shirred Eggs with Mushrooms and Asparagus; Roasted Garlic Flan with Char Grilled Toasts; and Scotch Eggs with Chorizo and Salsa Verde.
Food & Drink
|
March 12, 2021
2021-03-12
|
Live
|
50
Exploring Social Movements in the Fight Against Racism
Exploring Social Movements in the Fight Against Racism
-
The University of Michigan
In this episode of Michigan Minds, Matthew Countryman, PhD, associate professor of Afroamerican and African Studies, History, and American Culture and chair of the Department of Afroamerican and African Studies at University of Michigan, explores the 2020 demonstrations against systemic racism and police violence and how they compare to social movements throughout history. Countryman’s research focuses on African American political and social movements, primarily in the second half of the 20th century. He is examining the current protests from a historical perspective, which he says helps us understand what’s happening now and how it might shape society. “This is unprecedented in scale and scope,” he says of the recent demonstrations across the US. “We have not seen this level of mass participation cutting across all kinds of racial differences, encompassing a whole nation.”
Culture & Politics
|
March 28, 2021
2021-03-28
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Eye of the Expert: Buttons and Bows
Eye of the Expert: Buttons and Bows
-
Boston Athenaeum
Small things can have BIG stories, as Assistant Curator Ginny Badgett, Curator of Rare Books and Head of Special Collections John Buchtel, and William D. Hacker Head of Reader Services Mary Warnement demonstrate in their exploration of sample books from the BA’s special collections. Badgett will offer a glimpse into the world of French wallpaper, interior design, and consumer tastes of the 1920s through a dazzling bound volume of 479 colorful block-printed wallpaper samples, including work by the famous Zuber & Company and a representation of Charlie Chaplin in The Kid (1921). Buchtel will present Souvenir Products of the City of Industries, Kingsport, Tennessee (ca. 1930). With three book-related products—including what was touted as "America’s Smallest Book" produced in "America’s Largest Book Plant”—the set reveals the inter-relatedness of modern book production and other manufactures. Moving to the “Crystal Valley” of what is now the Czech Republic, Warnement will present the Button sample book of the Jos. Riedel Glasfabriken, Polaun (ca. 1935) to explore the story of one of the world’s most renowned glassmaking families, known for both its fine craftsmanship and industrial innovation.
Reading & Writing
|
March 10, 2021
2021-03-10
|
Live
|
FREE
Facing Change: White-Adjacent
-
Barnes Foundation
“Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced.” —James Baldwin. Gather with us for Facing Change, our new online speaker series. Every other month, the Barnes is bringing together artists, scholars, and community activists virtually for a multicultural and intergenerational conversation about race in America. Today’s conversation focuses on the term “white-adjacent,” which describes a person who is part of a minority group but has access to, utilizes, or benefits from white privilege. The panel features writer Anne Ishii, filmmaker Rey Miranda, and musician Mel Hsu, with producer Loraine Ballard Morrill as moderator. During the program, you’ll be encouraged to use the chat function to submit your own questions.
Art & Music
|
April 19, 2021
2021-04-19
|
Live
|
FREE
Facing Race: Racism, Resistance and Reckoning in the United States
-
Rice University
“Race is a mirage but one that humanity has organized itself around in very real ways. To be antiracist is to… recognize the living, breathing reality of this racial mirage, which makes our skin colors more meaningful than our individuality.” --Ibram X. Kendi. This course explores the long, painful history of race and anti-black racism in the United States and the powerful movements to resist racial oppression from the Civil War, Emancipation and Reconstruction through the Civil Rights movement and today’s Black Lives Matter movement. Rice University faculty present current scholarship and also introduce and facilitate conversations with new and emerging scholars who share historical and contemporary insights on our country’s fraught relationship with race and anti-black racism. We also examine present day efforts to reckon with the legacy of slavery and structural inequity. The series culminates with an invitation to imagine and shape new futures.
Culture & Politics
|
March 10, 2021
2021-03-10
|
Live
|
250
Film: Autopsy on a Dream - The Untold Story of Building the Sydney Opera House
-
Sydney Opera House
Rediscovered in recent years, this BBC documentary is as extraordinary as its provocative subject matter — the dramatic story of the building of the Sydney Opera House, culminating in Utzon’s departure from the project. Containing a new prologue called ‘The Dream of Perfection’, it tells the fascinating story of the lost film and brings the story up-to- date, featuring interviews with Sir David Attenborough, architect Richard le Plaistrier, plus many others. Courtesy of the Sydney Opera House--from our house to yours--stream this film anytime from the comfort of your home.
Film & Photography
|
March 9, 2021
2021-03-09
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Finding Fairness: The Past's Lessons for a Better Future
-
Royal Ontario Museum
Gather with ROM's Justin Jennings as he explores how the idea of fairness has shaped society over the last 20,000 years. Facing new challenges, people do both wonderful and terrible things in the name of fairness. This talk explores how an understanding of how we managed past challenges can help us better navigate through today's uncertain times. This program celebrates the publication of the new book Finding Fairness: From Pleistocene Foragers to Contemporary Capitalists. Justin Jennings is Senior Curator of Latin American archaeology at the Royal Ontario Museum as well as associate professor of anthropology at the University of Toronto. He has conducted fieldwork in Peru for more than twenty years, and has published on ancient states, early cities, and feasting in the Andes and other parts of the world. He is the author or editor of many books, including Globalizations and the Ancient World and Drink, Power, and Society in the Andes.
Science & Nature
|
March 24, 2021
2021-03-24
|
Live
|
FREE
Food in Art
-
Harvard Art Museums
Gather with us on Zoom for a bite-size look at the role of food in art, presented in partnership with the Food Literacy Project at Harvard University Dining Services. From vegetable-based dyes to dairy fixatives, food and art share a long and interesting history. In this talk, curatorial and conservation fellows Ruby Awburn, Lauren Hanson, Leonie Mueller, and Julie Wertz will take us on a culinary tour of the Harvard Art Museums and discuss the varied roles that food has played in art.
Art & Music
|
March 31, 2021
2021-03-31
|
Live
|
FREE
French Refresher Course – Beginner A1
-
French Institute: Alliance Francaise
Brush up your French in this interactive refresher course offered for the Beginner A1 level and get a head start on the next level, Advanced Beginner A2. Ideal for students who want to strengthen and review their language skills before moving on to the next level, we’ll explore online media, video and contemporary music to reinforce conversation abilities, comprehension, grammar and vocabulary. Setting aside the traditional textbook format, we’ll engage with real-world situations and dialogue for a unique, fun transition into the next stage of your French journey.
Culture & Politics
|
April 8, 2021
2021-04-08
|
Live
|
299
From Portable Studio to Digital Archive—A Look at Otto Piene’s Sketchbooks
-
Harvard Art Museums
Since we are unable to welcome you into the museums at this time, we are bringing our experts to you in the online series Art Study Center Seminars at Home. Otto Piene (1928–2014) was a pioneer in multimedia and technology-based art, creating a large, kaleidoscopic body of work based on the intersections of art, science, and nature. In this session, curatorial fellow Lauren Hanson and museum data specialist Jeff Steward share their research into the 2019 gift of Piene’s sketchbooks—a visual archive of over seven decades of artistic practice—and how the bound pages of these “portable studios” act as a generative site for visual thinking. They will also discuss the current development of a digital project that will allow audiences around the globe to experience the intimacy and dynamism found in the nearly 9,000 pages of Piene’s sketchbooks.
Art & Music
|
April 16, 2021
2021-04-16
|
Live
|
FREE
Frontiers Lecture: Spinning the Cosmic Web
-
American Museum of Natural History
What is the fabric of our universe, how did it form, and how is it evolving? Astronomers investigating this question recently constructed the Cosmic Web of Galaxies, a complete census of the local universe. Join Tom Jarrett, lead scientist of the IDIA Visualization Lab at the University of Cape Town’s Department of Astronomy, and Brian Abbott, assistant director of the Hayden Planetarium, as they unpack how small perturbations, gravitational instabilities, and spacetime expansion provide insight into the structure of the very early universe and its evolution over eons. Fly through the most complete 3D map of the local universe as astrophysics educator Irene Pease virtually pilots through 2MASS Redshift Survey data, a seminal redshift survey, and bring into sharp focus how the Cosmic Web regulates and transforms galaxies across time.
Science & Nature
|
March 17, 2021
2021-03-17
|
Live
|
15
Germany: Perspective On The U.S.-Germany Alliance, EU, And International Security
-
Stanford Hoover Institution
In this seventh episode of Battlegrounds, H.R. McMaster and Ambassador Christopher Heusgen discuss the U.S.-Germany alliance, the European Union, and responses to humanitarian crises.
Culture & Politics
|
March 15, 2021
2021-03-15
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Gesture, Sound, and Speech: What Do I Do with My Hands?
-
Berkeley Repertory Theater
Let gestures help you clearly send information across long distances. Did you know there are six types of gesture? Each type can help the actor (or anyone) modify and intensify their speech in incredible ways. Work with your own monologue and discover how gesture can illuminate what you say.
Art & Music
|
March 8, 2021
2021-03-08
|
Live
|
170
Getting Wrecked: Harm Reduction, Substance Use and the COVID-19 Pandemic
-
Princeton University
Gather with Dr. Kimberly Sue, Medical Director of the National Harm Reduction Coalition, for a discussion on women, incarceration, and the opioid crisis, brought to you by the Global Health Program Colloquium Series and Princeton's Center for Health and Wellbeing.
Health & Wellness
|
March 12, 2021
2021-03-12
|
Live
|
FREE
Getty Talks: Caravaggio: An Overview
-
Getty
Distinguished art historian Michael Fried, professor emeritus of humanities at Johns Hopkins University, takes off from each of the three great paintings that were on loan to the Getty Museum from the Galleria Borghese in Rome to provide an overview of Caravaggio's remarkable, world-transforming achievement.
Art & Music
|
March 13, 2021
2021-03-13
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Getty Talks: Egyptology Meets Science
-
Getty
In this inspiring talk, Christian Greco, director of the Egyptian Museum of Turin, shows how he breathes new life into old discoveries and modernized the nearly 200-year-old museum dedicated to Egyptian art and culture. Previously recorded at the Getty Villa.
Art & Music
|
March 28, 2021
2021-03-28
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Great Decisions: Struggles Over The Melting Arctic
-
WGBH Boston
U.S. President Donald Trump left many scratching their heads when it was rumored that he was looking to purchase the large island nation of Greenland from Denmark. While any potential deal seems highly unlikely, the event shows the changing opinion within the U.S. government toward engagement with the Arctic region. Because of climate change, large sheets of arctic ice are melting, exposing vast stores of natural gas and oil. With Russia and China already miles ahead with their Arctic strategies, can the U.S. catch up?
Culture & Politics
|
March 24, 2021
2021-03-24
|
Live
|
FREE
Guns and Public Health
-
Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard
While at Radcliffe, David Hemenway is continuing his work to find common ground between gun users and such groups as governors, faith leaders, and advocates to effectively address firearm injuries. He is also beginning his work on a book that summarizes what is currently known about firearms and public health and the programs and policies that seem to work to reduce gun violence.
Culture & Politics
|
April 7, 2021
2021-04-07
|
Live
|
FREE
Haiku and You: Painting Edo and the Arnold Arboretum
-
Harvard Art Museums
Gather with us on Zoom to discover haiku this spring, inspired by the Arnold Arboretum and the Harvard Art Museums exhibition Painting Edo: Japanese Art from the Feinberg Collection! Haiku, a concise form of poetry that originated in Japan and was popularized during the explosively creative Edo period (1615–1868), has since been adopted around the world as a means of capturing the ways in which the natural world and humanity intersect. It is made up of just a few words that tell a story about what you see, what you think, or how you react to the world around you. Haiku offers a chance to slow down, look closely, and see from a different perspective. In this lively program, professor David Atherton and curator Rachel Saunders will explore poetry and painting during the Edo period. Poet Sheryl White will look at how haiku has evolved as a contemporary creative practice in North America and will offer tips for writing your own haiku. Finally, professor David George Haskell will discuss how to awaken your senses to connect with nature and find words to capture the beauty of the world around you.
Reading & Writing
|
March 26, 2021
2021-03-26
|
Live
|
FREE
Hands Off or Hands On? Perspectives on Managing Nature
-
Stanford University
Should we let wild nature run its course within a nature preserve, or should we intervene to guide it in directions we deem beneficial? There is a long and deeply rooted set of assumptions in the United States that the purpose of a national park or wilderness area is to preserve nature in a primeval state. And many of us—whether backpacking in Yosemite or enjoying one of our many local parks here in the Bay Area—continue to assume that this is what we are seeing. Yet appearances can be deceptive, and there is now a large body of research in ecology and anthropology that suggests that the distinction between natural and human-made is rarely so clear-cut. In reality, we must often choose among different kinds of human-influenced scenarios when stewarding a landscape. We will look at a couple different case studies here in California: the hidden history of Native American land management practices that helped shape some of the landscapes we see today, and the difficult choices we now face confronting mega-wildfires in the Sierra Nevada. How might we rethink our sense of connection to these landscapes that are never exclusively “natural?”
Culture & Politics
|
March 17, 2021
2021-03-17
|
Live
|
FREE
Hemingway the Author
-
WGBH Boston
Gather with GBH and the Kennedy Library for a preview and discussion of Hemingway, the new documentary series directed by award-winning filmmakers Ken Burns and Lynn Novick. Writers Abraham Verghese and Tobias Wolff will join Burns and Novick in a conversation moderated by Kennedy Library Director Alan Price about Ernest Hemingway’s life, craft and legacy as one of America’s greatest writers. The event will feature clips from the three-part, six-hour series premiering on your local PBS station on April 5.
Reading & Writing
|
March 16, 2021
2021-03-16
|
Live
|
FREE
Historian John Matteson on “A Worse Place Than Hell”
-
WGBH Boston
Pulitzer Prize-winning author, John Matteson, discusses his latest work, “A Worse Place Than Hell: How the Civil War Battle of Fredericksburg Changed a Nation.” December 1862: As Abraham Lincoln’s government threatened to fracture, five extraordinary individuals were tested – Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., army chaplain Arthur Fuller, poet Walt Whitman, Louisa May Alcott, and John Pelham, a West Point cadet on the other side of the national schism. The months ahead had repercussions in the country’s law, literature, politics, and popular mythology. Don’t miss hearing about the lives of these individuals and John Matteson’s new work, an interweaving of the personal and the historic. Our featured author will be joined on screen by guest moderator author Debby Applegate, also winner of the Pulitzer Prize for History.
Reading & Writing
|
March 23, 2021
2021-03-23
|
Live
|
FREE
Hopkins at Home: The Politics of Food
-
Johns Hopkins University
Food is central to our daily lives, yet few of us consider the political implications of what we eat. How does our personal connection to, and daily consumption of, food shape how we think about these issues? What does food and agriculture tell us about the political process and the power of special interests? In what respects does the food system illustrate broader features of contemporary capitalism? Can food reveal anything about the quality of our democracy? Tune into this livestream with Professor Adam Sheingate to explore these questions and reveal the politics of food. Adam Sheingate, PhD is a professor of Political Science at Johns Hopkins University where he teaches courses on American politics and institutions, including a popular seminar on the politics of food. His most recent book is Building a Business of Politics: The Rise of Political Consulting and the Transformation of American Democracy. He is also the author of the Rise of the Agricultural Welfare State: Institutions and Interest Group Power in the United States, France, and Japan as well as journal articles and book chapters on American political development, historical institutionalism, and comparative public policy. Sheingate joined the Johns Hopkins University faculty in 2000 and served as Department Chair from 2015-2020.
Food & Drink
|
March 18, 2021
2021-03-18
|
Live
|
FREE
How Did We Get Here? Confronting Race in America
-
The Atlantic
The murder of George Floyd sparked nationwide outrage and protests against police brutality. But the growing angst among Black America was steadily brewing as COVID-19 lay bare the glaring racial inequalities in this country. The Atlantic and Secretary of the Smithsonian Lonnie Bunch will explore this moment in history, and examine how protests can influence policy and create a more equitable America.
Culture & Politics
|
March 25, 2021
2021-03-25
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
How Do We Address Privacy in the World of Artificial Intelligence?
-
National Humanities Center
As part of "In Our Image: Artificial Intelligence and the Humanities," a virtual conference exploring the critical intersection between the humanities and artificial intelligence, gather with us for a panel discussion featuring: Matthew Booker, Moderator, Vice President for Scholarly Programs, National Humanities Center; Sarah E. Igo, Andrew Jackson Professor of History, Professor of Law, Professor of Political Science, Professor of Sociology, Vanderbilt University; Ross Andersen, Deputy Editor, The Atlantic; Nita A. Farahany, Robinson O. Everett Professor of Law & Philosophy, Founding Director of Duke Science & Society, Chair of the Duke MA in Bioethics & Science Policy, Duke University; and Dr. Louis J. Muglia, President, Burroughs Wellcome Fund.
Culture & Politics
|
April 21, 2021
2021-04-21
|
Live
|
FREE
How Do We Trust?: Documentary Photography Past and Present
-
New Bedford Whaling Museum
Join internationally acclaimed photojournalist, Peter Pereira, who is currently working for the New Bedford Standard Times, and the museum's Director of Digital Initiatives, Michael Lapides, and Curator of Maritime History, Michael P. Dyer, for a conversation around the history of ethics in photojournalism and the future of documentary photography in the digital age. Where once the Local History Guild featured individual speakers, this season features a different format: conversations among area experts, aficionados, librarians, archivists, curators, historic preservation specialists, historians, and collectors. Topics run the gamut from commercial fishing to historic houses, to the latest acquisitions, collections or publications. Each moderated 60 minute program features specialists who will discuss the topics of their interest, trends, initiatives, projects and sometimes even new books, or public access databases of relevance to our local historical landscape.
Film & Photography
|
March 11, 2021
2021-03-11
|
Live
|
FREE
How to View Art II: Modern Art
-
University of Chicago Graham School
How do we understand the art that has come out of the great art revolutions of the late 19th century and early 20th century in France? Even a viewer who is equipped with basic principles for viewing art may be at a loss in addressing modern visual work. This class, which is a sequel to How to View Art I, will thoroughly survey the various media and movements of late 19th century visual art, the modern conceptions of art and the role of art in modern Western culture. Prerequisite: How to View Art I or instructor permission.
Art & Music
|
March 30, 2021
2021-03-30
|
Live
|
475
How to Write a New Yorker Cartoon Caption
-
The New Yorker
Have you marveled at how New Yorker cartoon captions are so clever and so...just perfect? Have you ever tried your hand at the weekly cartoon caption contest? Take a quick tutorial from two actors that will spark some creative energy to try again! Ellie Kemper and Daniel Radcliffe, stars of “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt: Kimmy vs. the Reverend,” team up for The New Yorker’s Cartoon Caption Contest.
Reading & Writing
|
March 19, 2021
2021-03-19
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
ICP Lessons: Ace Lehner on Portraiture and Representation
-
The International Center of Photography
Photographer and scholar Ace Lehner is a leading voice examining the complexities of representation in photography, with a focus on queer and trans people, as well as in the age of social media. Through photographic projects and performances such as Gender is a Drag and Barbershop: The Art of Queer Failure, Lehner uses visual cues and gestures to explore the concept of multifaceted identity. Through writing and teaching, Lehner further examines the history of looking and portraiture in photography while also constructing new critical frameworks for future imagemaking. Gather with us for the next ICP Lessons, a three-day lecture series hosted by David Campany, with Lehner focused on portraiture and representation.
Film & Photography
|
March 17, 2021
2021-03-17
|
Live
|
35
ICP Lessons: Sara Hylton on Staying Engaged as a Photographer
-
The International Center of Photography
Gather with us for the next ICP Lessons, a three-day lecture series hosted by David Campany, with visual storyteller Sara Hylton on staying engaged as a photographer. Hylton will share her experience creating intimate and personal work and staying motivated while pursuing new ideas. Canadian photographer Sara Hylton, a 2014 graduate of ICP’s One-Year Certificate Program in Documentary Practice and Visual Journalism, travels the globe with her camera, using it to shine an intimate light on stories of resilience and to challenge oppressive and unjust systems within society. From documenting those living along the Keystone XL pipeline in Montana to her powerful environmental portraits depicting families of missing and murdered indigenous women (MMIW) in Saskatchewan Canada, Hylton continually seeks new ideas to explore and stories to tell. In the next session of ICP Lessons, we will learn more about Hylton’s approach to crafting an evolving vision and pursuing avenues for sharing her work.
Film & Photography
|
March 10, 2021
2021-03-10
|
Live
|
35
ICP Talks: Hassan Hajjaj on Portraiture, Fashion, and the Industry
-
The International Center of Photography
Moroccan photographer Hassan Hajjaj’s fashion-forward portraits of artists, musicians, models, local community members, and cultural figures are distinctly his own. He fuses colorful pattern-filled and often symbolic backdrops with a passion for fashion to style and capture his subjects with a commanding presence. In doing so, he redefines cultural stereotypes and presents strong representations of Blackness in his images. Inspired by the photography studios of small-town 1960s Morocco and drawing on the playfulness and consumer aesthetic used by the artists of the Pop Art movement, Hajjaj’s work cheekily unites art, fashion, and commerce. His use of popular items such as Coca-Cola cans and Nike shoes when styling, framing of photographs by literal canned goods and soda cans, and work on his fashion and design lines “Andy Wahloo” and UK-based La Larache showcase the underlying theme of the globalization of consumerism in his work. Gather with ICP’s Curator at Large Isolde Brielmaier and Hassan Hajjaj for the last lecture in our winter/spring ICP Talks series focusing on Hajjaj’s industry spanning practice and vibrant portraits, including his most recent project My Rockstars.
Film & Photography
|
May 12, 2021
2021-05-12
|
Live
|
9
ICP Talks: Mari Katayama on “Myself and the Others: Self-Portraits and this Word”
-
The International Center of Photography
Mari Katayama is a Japanese artist who uses photography, sculpture, performance, and textiles to explore the relationship between self and physicality in her layered projects. Using her body as material, she performs self-portraits for the camera, often wearing her own patchworked, embroidered creations, and stuffed prosthetics, as she takes on various identities that explore vulnerabilities and empowerment within the body. Born with a rare condition, Katayama had her legs amputated at the age of nine and learned to walk using prosthetics. She became accustomed to sewing her own clothes, which informs her prominent use of fibers within her work and her advocacy for the freedom of choice to be accessible to all bodies, a platform she iterates through the High Heel Project. Gather with us us for an evening with Katayama for her talk, “Myself and the Others: Self-Portraits and this Word.”
Film & Photography
|
April 7, 2021
2021-04-07
|
Live
|
9
Imaginaries of LA: Guadalupe Rosales and Rita Gonzalez
-
Getty
The second conversation in our Imaginaries of LA series brings together artist Guadalupe Rosales and curator Rita Gonzalez, who will discuss how the making of art and archives from embodied, lived experiences can transform the social and political production of urban space. Since its founding in 1781, Los Angeles has existed on contested land. Although long recognized as a diverse and multicultural city, its history is marked by segregation, racist city planning, and harmful urban redevelopment policies. Imaginaries of LA is a series of conversations between Los Angeles-based artists and curators that explores what is at stake in the various strategies that artists use to represent Los Angeles and provides a forum for debate about the past, present and future of the city. Guadalupe Rosales is a Los Angeles-based multidisciplinary artist, archivist, educator, and founder of community-generated archival projects “Veteranas and Rucas” and "Map Pointz” on Instagram. Guadalupe’s work centers on the creation of immersive and sensorial spaces to activate memory and evoke a collective experience and embodiment. Rita Gonzalez is Terri and Michael Smooke curator and department head of the Department of Contemporary Art at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, where she curated Phantom Sightings: Art after the Chicano Movement; Asco: Elite of the Obscure; and Agnès Varda in Californialand, among other exhibitions. This program is moderated by Zanna Gilbert, senior research specialist, and was organized by Zanna Gilbert and Isabel Wade, research assistant at Getty Research Institute. Advance registration is required.
Art & Music
|
March 18, 2021
2021-03-18
|
Live
|
FREE
Improv Drop-In Online
-
The Second City
Are you interested in taking an improv class, but you're not quite sure if it's right for you? Give it a test drive! Our weekly drop-in improv class for beginners is open to everyone, whether you have ever improvised or not. It's a great opportunity to practice, have some fun, and meet new people! We’ve figured out how to bring real, live fun straight from The Second City to you! Our totally digital, totally FUN improv drop-in classes are for anyone looking for 90 minutes of fun and creativity---with other people. All you need is an internet connection and a camera, and we’ll have you “yes, and”-ing in no time. This crash course is taught by our Second City Training Center comedy pros in Chicago, LA, and Toronto. Sign up by yourself, or encourage your friends to join your session for a virtual get-together!
Art & Music
|
March 9, 2021
2021-03-09
|
Live
|
25
In Our Image: Artificial Intelligence and the Humanities
-
National Humanities Center
Artificial intelligence has infiltrated our daily lives—in the ways we conduct business, govern, provide healthcare and security, and communicate. The large-scale cultural and societal implications of these changes—and the ethical questions they raise—pose a serious challenge as we embrace a future increasingly shaped by the implementation of AI technology. Join us for a series of virtual events—presentations, conversations, webinars, film screenings, and an art exhibition—highlighting perspectives from leading humanists, scientists, engineers, artists, writers, and software company executives collectively advancing inquiry into key emerging questions. With events and convenings spread out over three weeks, this series of events is intended to foster future cooperation and exploration. All events will be live-streamed and archived for future dissemination. Thanks to generous support from our sponsors, this conference is offered free of charge. However, registration is required to access conference sessions, view films, and explore the online art exhibit. Sessions span over April 7-22. Complete schedule on registration page.
Culture & Politics
|
April 7, 2021
2021-04-07
|
Live
|
FREE
In Whose Image? Exploring Questions Raised in Film about Our Humanity in an Artificial Intelligence Era
-
National Humanities Center
As part of "In Our Image: Artificial Intelligence and the Humanities," a virtual conference exploring the critical intersection between the humanities and artificial intelligence, gather with us for a panel discussion featuring: Marsha Gordon, Professor of Film Studies, North Carolina State University; Wesley Hogan, Director, Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University; and Natalie Bullock Brown, Assistant Teaching Professor, Department of Interdisciplinary Studies, North Carolina State University.
Film & Photography
|
April 19, 2021
2021-04-19
|
Live
|
FREE
International Women's Day @ The Hoover Institution | A Focus on Women in National Security
-
Stanford Hoover Institution
To celebrate International Women’s Day, the Director of the Hoover Institution and the 66th Secretary of State, Condoleezza Rice, is hosting a conversation with four of our leading female national security and foreign policy scholars: Elizabeth Economy, Rose Gottemoeller, Ayaan Hirsi Ali, and Amy Zegart. Each of these esteemed Hoover Fellows is releasing a book this year addressing the vital issues of our day. Through the lens of their own experiences, Secretary Rice and these scholars will discuss women's leadership, diversity, talent, and accomplishments in national security, as well as the challenges and rewards of working in this environment.
Culture & Politics
|
March 8, 2021
2021-03-08
|
Live
|
FREE
Introduction to Creative Writing
-
UCLA Extension
This six-week course is perfect for anyone just getting started on their path to being a writer. Students work in small breakout sessions with experienced writers and teachers, then attend a lecture by various guest speakers with expertise in fiction, poetry, nonfiction, or screenwriting. Short assignments are workshopped in the weekly breakout sessions. The goal of the course is to expose new writers to a variety of types of writing while getting their creative juices flowing. At the end of the quarter, students feel more confident about their skills and are prepared for further study of writing.
Reading & Writing
|
May 1, 2021
2021-05-01
|
Live
|
455
Introduction to French
-
French Institute: Alliance Francaise
Your first date with French! Through a mix of French and English, this short primer course gives you the essential tools to excel as you begin your French journey. This course is specifically designed for students with no prior French exposure. You will study how French and English grammar and verbs work, how they can be so similar and so different at the same time. Through comparative grammar, conjugation and vocabulary, you will discover all the tips and tricks of the French language. Take the class live on Zoom with FIAF’s experienced teachers and start speaking French from Day 1. After completing this course, you will be ready to continue on to Beginner French A1 Level 1.
Culture & Politics
|
April 9, 2021
2021-04-09
|
Live
|
299
Italy’s Food, Culture & Sights: North to South
-
92nd Street Y
You may not be able to actually visit Italy right now, but you can enjoy a virtual tour with 92Y’s resident food historian and Italy expert, Francine Segan. Italy is a country with 20 different regions, each with its own very different food traditions, culture and customs. Discover the regional differences in Italian wines, liqueurs, cocktails, cheeses, pastas, desserts, and ways of enjoying coffee. Explore the diverse holiday traditions from north to south. Weaved throughout will be fascinating information on unique sights and cultural events in each area. Registrants will receive handouts for each class with recipes and other information. Topics: April 15: Italy’s northern regions: Venice, Turin, Milan, Florence, Bologna & beyond; April 22: Italy’s central & southern regions: Rome, Naples, Sicily & beyond.
Food & Drink
|
April 15, 2021
2021-04-15
|
Live
|
40
Jamal Greene: How Rights Went Wrong in America
-
Commonwealth Club
America prides itself on freedom and guaranteed rights for all its citizens, but has the explosion of rights resulted in a partisan divide among its citizens? You have the right to remain silent and the right to free speech. The right to worship, and to doubt. The right to be free from discrimination, and to hate. These rights were not written at the founding of our country, but rather an afterthought of our country’s founding fathers. It wasn't until the racial strife resulting from the Civil War and missteps by the Supreme Court that rights gained a great deal of controversy. This controversy has falsely led many Americans to believe that awarding rights to one group means denying rights to others. Columbia professor and constitutional law expert Jamal Greene seeks to understand this phenomenon in his new book How Rights Went Wrong: Why Our Obsession with Rights Is Tearing America Apart. Greene says that in order to prevent society from complete division, we must recouple rights for all with justice for all. Gather with us as Greene grounds us in the foundations of our country and envisions a future of equity and guaranteed rights for every American.
Reading & Writing
|
March 31, 2021
2021-03-31
|
Live
|
FREE
Jazz 101: A Beginner's Guide to Jazz
-
Jazz at Lincoln Center
Swing University offers engaging virtual classes for jazz fans, enthusiasts, and students of all backgrounds and levels. Our fun and informal classes are taught by industry experts like Seton Hawkins as well as members of the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra including Kenny Rampton, Marcus Printup, Chris Crenshaw, Sherman Irby, and more. Explore jazz history, discuss new and classic tunes, and discover listening methods that will improve your concert experiences. In Jazz 101, our instructors will guide you through the history and development of various jazz styles. Students will develop their ears to hear the many details and intricacies that make this music so endlessly fascinating. Instructor and Swing University curator Seton Hawkins will provide your introduction to jazz; no musical knowledge is required. Each week covers a different topic. This week: Cool Jazz and Hard Bop. The revolution of BeBop sparked the emergence of new styles of Jazz. We’ll look at two of them tonight—Cool Jazz and Hard Bop—and explore how they emerged out of the BeBop revolution.
Art & Music
|
March 13, 2021
2021-03-13
|
Live
|
10
Jehane Noujaim: Making Documentaries Today
-
Yale University
Jehane Noujaim is a verité-style documentary filmmaker who brings intimacy and empathy to whatever topic she pursues. Beginning with her early films, Rafea: Solar Mama (2013), Control Room (2004) and Startup.com (2001), Noujaim’s work is social and political, tackling large issues through the individuals experiencing them. Her film The Square (2013) provided a ground-level view of the Egyptian Revolution and garnered an Oscar nomination, three Emmy wins, and the Audience Award at the Sundance Film Festival. Noujaim, along with producer-director Karim Amer explored the Cambridge Analytica hack in The Great Hack (2019), which was hailed by The Guardian as “the most important doc [of the] year” and made the Academy Award and Grierson shortlists. She and Amer are currently producing and directing the HBO series The Vow, which follows members who joined the self-improvement group NXIVM ––whose leader, Keith Raniere, was convicted of sex trafficking and racketeering conspiracy, among other crimes – and reveals the emotional toll of unfolding events.
Film & Photography
|
March 10, 2021
2021-03-10
|
Live
|
FREE
Jenny Lawson in Conversation With Luvvie Ajayi Jones
-
Powell's City of Books
As Jenny Lawson’s hundreds of thousands of fans know, she suffers from depression. In Broken (In the Best Possible Way), she explores her experimental treatment of transcranial magnetic stimulation with brutal honesty. But also with brutal humor. Lawson discusses the frustration of dealing with her insurance company in “An Open Letter to My Insurance Company,” which should be an anthem for anyone who has ever had to call their insurance company to try and get a claim covered. She tackles such timelessly debated questions as “How do dogs know they have penises?” We see how her vacuum cleaner almost set her house on fire, how she was attacked by three bears, business ideas she wants to pitch to Shark Tank, and why she can never go back to the post office. Of course, Lawson’s long-suffering husband Victor — the Ricky to Jenny’s Lucille Ball — is present throughout. A treat for Jenny Lawson’s already existing fans, and destined to convert new ones, Broken is a beacon of hope and a wellspring of laughter. Lawson will be joined in conversation by Luvvie Ajayi Jones, host of the Rants & Randomness podcast and author of I’m Judging You: The Do-Better Manual and Professional Troublemaker: The Fear-Fighter Manual. Purchasing a signed preorder copy of Broken (In the Best Possible Way) entitles you to attend the virtual event. After you’ve purchased the book, you will be automatically registered for the Zoom event, and will be sent a confirmation email two days prior to the event containing a Zoom link to the event and instructions on how to access it.
Reading & Writing
|
April 6, 2021
2021-04-06
|
Live
|
27.99
Jenny Offill in Conversation with Brit Marling
-
City Arts & Lectures
Jenny Offill is the author of the novels Last Things, Dept. of Speculation, and, most recently, Weather–an ambitious work that balances the concerns of daily life as a wife and mother with the looming apocalypse of climate change. Both hilarious and heartbreaking, the novel asks readers to think about the mundane ways we live and grapple with our rapidly deteriorating environment. Offill lives in upstate New York and teaches at Syracuse University and in the low residency program at Queens University.
Reading & Writing
|
March 18, 2021
2021-03-18
|
Live
|
29
Jonathan Meiburg in Conversation With Michael Azerrad
-
Powell's City of Books
In 1833, Charles Darwin was astonished by an animal he met in the Falkland Islands: handsome, social, and oddly crow-like falcons that were “tame and inquisitive… quarrelsome and passionate,” and so insatiably curious that they stole hats, compasses, and other valuables from the crew of the Beagle. Darwin wondered why these birds were confined to remote islands at the tip of South America, sensing a larger story, but he set this mystery aside and never returned to it. Almost 200 years later, Jonathan Meiburg takes up this chase. He takes us through South America, from the fog-bound coasts of Tierra del Fuego to the tropical forests of Guyana, in search of these birds: striated caracaras, which still exist, though they’re very rare. He reveals the wild, fascinating story of their history, origins, and possible futures. And along the way, he draws us into the life and work of William Henry Hudson, the Victorian writer and naturalist who championed caracaras as an unsung wonder of the natural world, and to falconry parks in the English countryside, where captive caracaras perform incredible feats of memory and problem-solving. Meiburg’s A Most Remarkable Creature: The Hidden Life and Epic Journey of the World's Smartest Birds of Prey (Knopf) is a hybrid of science writing, travelogue, and biography, as generous and accessible as it is sophisticated, and absolutely riveting. Meiburg will be joined in conversation by Michael Azerrad, author of Our Band Could Be Your Life: Scenes From the American Indie Underground 1981-1991 and Come as You Are: The Story of Nirvana.
Reading & Writing
|
March 31, 2021
2021-03-31
|
Live
|
FREE
Journalism, COVID-19, and the Navajo Nation
-
The New Yorker
The Navajo Nation, which sprawls across close to eighteen million acres, has been hit hard by the pandemic. Watch as the New Yorker follows the work of local journalists covering the crisis. Spend twenty minutes to learn how one newspaper is covering the crisis in the most under-connected part of the United States.
Culture & Politics
|
March 22, 2021
2021-03-22
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Just Like You: Author Nick Hornby in Conversation with Ayelet Waldman
-
Chicago Humanities Festival
Nick Hornby’s latest novel Just Like You updates the meet-cute genre for a modern love story: Lucy, a 41 year old almost-divorcée, stands in line at a butcher shop watching her neighbor flirt with a much younger man behind the counter. It’s not exactly the stuff of dreams, but Lucy isn’t looking for romance (at least not yet). Join Hornby (High Fidelity) and Ayelet Waldman (The Mommy-Track Mysteries) for a chat about what it means for authors and characters to throw out the old scripts in order to try something new.
Reading & Writing
|
March 16, 2021
2021-03-16
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Kale Williams in Conversation With Jon Mooallem
-
Powell's City of Books
Six days after giving birth, a polar bear named Aurora got up and left her den at the Columbus Zoo, leaving her tiny, squealing cub to fend for herself. Hours later, Aurora still hadn’t returned. The cub was furless and blind, and with her temperature dropping dangerously, the zookeepers entrusted with her care felt they had no choice: They would have to raise one of the most dangerous predators in the world themselves, by hand. Over the next few weeks, a group of veterinarians and zookeepers would work around the clock to save the cub, whom they called Nora. Humans rarely get as close to a polar bear as Nora’s keepers got with their fuzzy charge. But the two species have long been intertwined. Three decades before Nora’s birth, her father, Nanuq, was orphaned when an Inupiat hunter killed his mother, leaving Nanuq to be sent to a zoo. That hunter, Gene Agnaboogok, now faces some of the same threats as the wild bears near his Alaskan village of Wales, on the westernmost tip of the North American continent. As sea ice diminishes and temperatures creep up year-after-year, Gene and the polar bears — and everyone and everything else living in the far north — are being forced to adapt. Not all of them will succeed. Sweeping and tender, Oregonian reporter Kale Williams’s The Loneliest Polar Bear (Crown) explores the fraught relationship humans have with the natural world, the exploitative and sinister causes of the environmental mess we find ourselves in, and how the fate of polar bears is not theirs alone. Williams be joined in conversation by Jon Mooallem, writer at large for The New York Times Magazine and author of Wild Ones: A Sometimes Dismaying, Weirdly Reassuring Story About Looking at People Looking at Animals in America.
Reading & Writing
|
March 24, 2021
2021-03-24
|
Live
|
FREE
Keeping Cooking Simple with Yotam Ottolenghi
-
Sydney Opera House
It’s hard to remember what we used to cook before Yotam Ottolenghi burst into our culinary consciousness. From his introduction of bold new flavours and ingredients, to his consistent foregrounding of vegetables in his meals, Ottolenghi’s books continue to excite and inspire food-lovers everywhere, from his home base in London. Spend an hour with Yotam and Adam Liaw, as they discuss what makes a recipe simple, cooking for fussy children and how Ottolenghi's books saved the humble cauliflower. As a bonus, check out five of the best isolation cooking receipes from Yotam picked by the staff of the Sydney Opera House: https://www.sydneyoperahouse.com/digital/articles/food/five-best-yotam-ottolenghi-recipes-for-isolation.html
Food & Drink
|
March 13, 2021
2021-03-13
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Kimberly Drew and Jenna Wortham on Black Futures
-
Chicago Humanities Festival
When Kimberly Drew (This Is What I Know About Art) and Jenna Wortham (New York Times Magazine staff writer and Still Processing podcast host) set out to collaborate, they were guided by a central question: “What does it mean to be Black and alive right now?” The resulting work, Black Futures, brings together diverse contributors across multiple formats—images, essays, recipes, tweets, poetry, and more—to capture and preserve flourishing Black creativity and art in our digital world. Join Drew and Wortham along with Black Futures contributor Chicago sociologist and writer Eve L. Ewing, for a conversation about the radical, imaginative, provocative, and gorgeous world that Black creators are bringing forth today.
Culture & Politics
|
March 25, 2021
2021-03-25
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Lady Bird Johnson: Hiding in Plain Sight
-
National Archives of the United States
Author Julia Sweig will discuss Lady Bird Johnson’s complex and captivating role—as a political partner to her husband, as a vital yet underappreciated presence in the White House, and as a critical adviser and strategist in the new biography, Lady Bird Johnson: Hiding in Plain Sight. The story is told in Lady Bird’s own words through the largely unknown and overlooked audio diaries that she kept during her years in the White House. Sweig unveils a new view of Lady Bird’s power within the Johnson Presidency and presents a surprisingly modern and influential American First Lady. Joining Julia Sweig in conversation will be Claudia Anderson, Archivist at the LBJ Presidential Library and Jeff Shesol, author of Mutual Contempt: Lyndon Johnson, Robert Kennedy and the Feud that Defined a Decade.
Reading & Writing
|
March 15, 2021
2021-03-15
|
Live
|
FREE
Laughter Yoga
-
UCSF
Laughter is contagious and has a powerful and immediate effect on our mind, body and spirit. Our bodies can’t tell the difference between real or simulated laughter. This class involves deep breathing, stretching, clapping, and laughter exercises. Our laughter exercises in this class can: Increase blood flow and oxygen to all the major organs; Enhance endorphin levels which make us feel uplifted and reduce pain' Stimulate immune, digestive, and cardiac systems; Reduce stress levels; Relax, strengthen, and lengthen the muscles with stretching; Help create a laughing community and be fun!
Health & Wellness
|
March 11, 2021
2021-03-11
|
Live
|
FREE
Leaders in Crisis: American Presidents Who Saved Our Country
-
NYU School of Professional Studies
On a handful of occasions in American history, the very existence of the nation was in doubt. Each time, Americans were fortunate to have leaders capable of rising to the challenge. In this two-session course, we will study Washington as he chose to cross the Delaware and carry the fight to the British even as independence seemed lost, Lincoln as he steered the divided country through the Civil War, FDR as he confronted economic collapse during the banking crisis, and Kennedy as he faced the end of the world during the Cuban missile crisis. Using actual and reenacted video, instructor Jess Velona recreates the key meetings in which these leaders agonized over stark choices and the speeches by which they rallied the nation to meet the crisis. Always up for discussion is how these past leaders might have addressed the crises of pandemic and racial injustice in our own time.
Culture & Politics
|
April 16, 2021
2021-04-16
|
Live
|
199
Leadership for Society Series: Race & Power
-
Stanford University
This week: Sports: Leveling the Playing Field. Games are serious business. From the schoolyard to professional leagues, sports are a ubiquitous presence in our society. Few areas have been as explicit in the popular conversation about race as sports. From ideas around genetic aptitude and ability, to conversations about who should discuss racial politics, sports has often been at the cutting edge of discussion. Professor Brian Lowery talks with Nneka Ogwumike, basketball player for the Los Angeles Sparks and President of the Women's National Basketball Association and with RC Buford, the CEO of Spurs Sports and Entertainment. They explore the role of sport and athletes in advancing the cause of racial equity.
Culture & Politics
|
March 8, 2021
2021-03-08
|
Live
|
FREE
Life is a Cabaret
-
NYU School of Professional Studies
In the late 19th century, a new kind of intimate performing arts venue emerged in the bohemian enclaves of Paris that would eventually become known worldwide as “cabarets.” Heralded by intellectuals, composers, musicians, performers, and visual artists, the Parisian trend quickly spread across continental Europe and eventually found its apotheosis in Berlin of the Weimar era, immortalized by Marlene Dietrich in The Blue Angel and reincarnated years later by Liza Minnelli in Bob Fosse’s Cabaret. This course, taught by the vintage cabaret specialist and New York City cabaret veteran known by his stage name Daniel Isengart, examines how the early European cabaret format borrowed from vaudeville and burlesque as well as much older genres such as the musical and literary salon, infusing it with a critical zeitgeist of modernity that shattered all conventions. Our goal is to understand the specific historical circumstances that created the cabaret genre. We will study its history via archival photographs, vintage film material, excerpts from movies, and literature and map its lasting influence on modern popular culture. Surprise guests from New York’s cabaret world will enliven this online class and demonstrate how life is and will always be a cabaret.
Art & Music
|
March 12, 2021
2021-03-12
|
Live
|
599
Live from Dizzy's Club: Helen Sung Quartet
-
Jazz at Lincoln Center
Live From Dizzy’s welcomes club favorites & emerging artists back to the Dizzy's Club stage. Join us from the comfort of your own home as we bring stunning New York views and the live jazz club experience to your living room. Additionally, each live performance will include an artist interview with Dizzy’s Club manager Roland Chassagne. This week: Helen Sung is a mighty force on piano—an adept soloist who combines her classical background with a passionate dedication to jazz and the feel of swing. Winner of the Mary Lou Williams Jazz Piano Competition and featured in 2011 on Wynton Marsalis’ “Who’s Got Next: Jazz Musicians to Watch” list, Sung’s career has exploded over the past decade. In addition to working with a number of top-shelf bands and bandleaders, she has received the highest praise for her own albums, which have featured both originals and inspired interpretations of compositions from Duke Ellington, Bud Powell, Fiddler on the Roof, and Thelonious Monk—the latter of which, not surprisingly, seems to be a favorite source of the material. For one night only, she returns by high demand to lead the Helen Sung Quartet. She kicks off our month-long celebration of Women in Jazz.
Art & Music
|
March 11, 2021
2021-03-11
|
Live
|
$10
Live from Prairie Lights: Adrienne Raphel in conversation with Micah Bateman
-
Prairie Lights Books
Please join us to celebrate the paperback release of Adrienne Rephel's book, Thinking Inside the Box: Adventures with Crosswords and the Puzzling People Who Can't Live Without Them. Adrienne Raphel will be joined by fellow Iowa Writers' Workshop alum, Micah Bateman. The New York Times Book Review, Editors’ Choice, says of the book, “This cultural and personal history of crosswords and their fans, written by an aficionado, is diverting, informative, and discursive.” Mary Norris, bestselling author of Between You & Me: Confessions of a Comma Queen, says: "For crossword puzzlers of every ilk, from solvers of the Monday-edition no-brainer to pencil-chewing addicts of the cryptic, Thinking Inside The Box is a gold mine of revelations. If there is a pantheon of cruciverbalist scholars, Adrienne Raphel has established herself squarely within it.” Adrienne Raphel is the author of Thinking Inside the Box: Adventures with Crosswords and the Puzzling People Who Can't Live Without Them (Penguin Press, 2020), and What Was It For (Rescue Press, 2017). Her essays, poetry, and criticism appear in The New Yorker, Poetry, The New Republic, The Atlantic, Paris Review Daily, Slate, and other publications. Born in New Jersey and raised in Vermont, Raphel holds a PhD in English from Harvard University, an MFA in poetry from the Iowa Writers' Workshop, and an AB from Princeton University. She is currently a Lecturer in the Princeton Writing Program. Micah Bateman teaches, writes, and presents on poetry, digital media, libraries, and creative writing out of the University of Iowa's School of Library and Information Science. He is a graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop; co-author of Mapping the Imaginary: Supporting Creative Writers through Programming, Prompts, and Research (ALA Editions: 2019); and author of a chapbook of poems, Polis (Catenary Press: 2015). Other work has appeared in The Los Angeles Review of Books Blog, The Chronicle of Higher Education, The Iowa Review, The Kenyon Review Online, and McSweeney's Internet Tendency.
Reading & Writing
|
March 16, 2021
2021-03-16
|
Live
|
FREE
Live from Prairie Lights: Gregory Brown in Conversation with Mark Mayer
-
Prairie Lights Books
Please join us for a reading with Iowa Writers' Workshop gradaute Gregory Brown to celebrate the release of his debut novel, The Lowering Days and a conversation with Mark Mayer, author of Aerialists. Richard Russo, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Empire Falls and Chances Are... says of the novel, ​“In The Lowering Days, Gregory Brown gives us a lush, almost mythic portrait of a very specific place and time that feels all the more universal for its singularity. There’s magic here.” Publisher's Weekly says "Brown’s dynamic debut shines a light on a small town’s fraught history in Maine’s Penobscot River valley... Brown poetically depicts the bucolic backdrop and grounds the action amid forested hillsides 'deep and green and smoky with the scent of pine.' Lyrical and gorgeously written, Brown’s memorable outing does justice to a complicated web of issues." Gregory Brown grew up along Penobscot Bay. His stories have appeared in Tin House, The Alaska Quarterly Review, Shenandoah, Epoch, and Narrative Magazine. A graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, he is the recipient of scholarships and fellowships from the MacDowell Colony and the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference. He lives in Maine with his family. The Lowering Days is his first novel. Mark Mayer's short story collection, Aerialists, won the Michener-Copernicus Prize and was shortlisted for the William Saroyan International Prize for Writing. He has been published in American Short Fiction, The Kenyon Review, Guernica, The Iowa Review, The Colorado Review, and The New York Times among others. A graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop, Mark has taught creative writing as the R.P. Dana Emerging Writer-in-Residence at Cornell College and as a Faculty Fellow in Creative Writing at Colby College. He teaches in the MFA program.
Reading & Writing
|
March 8, 2021
2021-03-08
|
Live
|
FREE
Live from Prairie Lights: Matthew Gavin Frank - Flight of the Diamond Smugglers
-
Prairie Lights Books
Please join us with the University of Iowa Nonfiction Writing Program to welcome Matthew Gavin Frank to read from his latest book, Flight of the Diamond Smugglers. He will be introduced by current NWP student Jonathan Gleason. Poet Aimee Nezhukumatathil says of Flight of the Diamond Smugglers, “Unforgettable. . . . An outstanding adventure in its lyrical, utterly compelling, and heartbreaking investigations of the world of diamond smuggling.” Kirkus Reviews says, "[T]he author creates an intriguing and unusual blend of genres. Here he mixes natural history with anthropology and a twist of true crime in a tale of small-scale theft." Matthew Gavin Frank’s next nonfiction book, Flight of the Diamond Smugglers (about, among other things, the ways in which carrier pigeons were used by diamond smuggling rings in coastal South Africa) is just out from W.W. Norton: Liveright. He is also the author of the nonfiction books, The Mad Feast: An Ecstatic Tour Through America’s Food (Liveright), Preparing the Ghost: An Essay Concerning the Giant Squid and Its First Photographer (Liveright), Pot Farm (The University of Nebraska Press), and Barolo (The University of Nebraska Press); the poetry books, The Morrow Plots (Black Lawrence Press), Warranty in Zulu (Barrow Street Press), and Sagittarius Agitprop (Black Lawrence Press).
Reading & Writing
|
March 19, 2021
2021-03-19
|
Live
|
FREE
Lunch Break Science: Anne Stone
-
The Leakey Foundation
Lunch Break Science is The Leakey Foundation’s new online series. This series features short talks and interviews with Leakey Foundation grantees about the latest in human origins research. Take a break from your day and feed your brain with The Leakey Foundation. Every Thursday at 11 am PDT. This week, explore the evolution of pathogens with Leakey Foundation grantee Anne Stone. Anne Stone is a Regents Professor in the School of Human Evolution and Social Change at the Arizona State University. Her specialization and main area of interest is anthropological genetics. Currently, her research focuses on population history and understanding how humans and the great apes have adapted to their environments, including their disease and dietary environments.
Science & Nature
|
March 14, 2021
2021-03-14
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Lunch Break Science: Chimpanzee Communication with Zarin Machanda
-
The Leakey Foundation
Take a break at lunch and learn about chimpanzee communication and relationships with Leakey Foundation grantee, Tufts University biologist, and director of the Kibale Chimpanzee Project Zarin Machanda. Zarin Machanda's research revolves around understanding the factors that shape the quality and development of social relationships among wild chimpanzees. Her work so far has focused mostly on the evolution of male-female relationships, male-male cooperation (especially cooperative hunting), and how chimpanzees use communication to mediate social relationships. Most recently, she has started a long-term project to study infant and juvenile chimpanzees and how they develop sex-typed adult behaviors. Zarin is the Director of Long-term Research at the Kibale Chimpanzee Project, an organization that for the last 30 years has conserved and protected the Kanyawara community of chimpanzees living in Kibale National Park, Uganda.
Science & Nature
|
March 16, 2021
2021-03-16
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Lunch Break Science: Genes and the Environment with Ainash Childebayeva
-
The Leakey Foundation
In this week's edition of Lunch Break Science, join Leakey Foundation grantee Ainash Childebayeva to learn about interactions between our genes and the environment. Childebayeva is a PhD candidate in Biological Anthropology and Toxicology at the University of Michigan. Her research is on the epigenomic signatures of adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia in the Peruvian Andes. Her research interests include human evolutionary genetics, human epigenetics, gene x environment interactions, and aDNA.
Science & Nature
|
March 17, 2021
2021-03-17
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Lunch Break Science: Owl Monkeys with Eduardo Fernandez-Duque
-
The Leakey Foundation
Lunch Break Science is a live-streamed web series featuring interviews, short talks, and live audience questions about the latest in human evolution research with Leakey Foundation scientists. This week: Primatologist Eduardo Fernandez-Duque discusses owl monkey pair-bonding and parental care in this episode of Lunch Break Science. Grab your lunch and join primatologist Eduardo Fernandez-Duque as he discusses male-female relationships, pair bonding, and paternal care in owl monkeys and several other monkey species in this episode of Lunch Break Science.
Science & Nature
|
March 11, 2021
2021-03-11
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Lunchtime Art Talk on Reynaldo Rivera
-
The Hammer Museum at UCLA
The Hammer's curatorial department leads free, insightful, short discussions about artists in Made in L.A. 2020 online every Wednesday at 12:30pm Pacific. This talk on Reynaldo Rivera is led by Vanessa Arizmendi, curatorial assistant. Reynaldo Rivera was born in Mexico but spent his childhood traveling across the border and within the United States—mostly between San Diego de la Unión, Mexico; Los Angeles; and Stockton, California—before settling as a young adult in East L.A. Rivera’s large (and largely unseen) body of photographic work captures the city’s queer clubs and house party scene in the 1980s and 1990s. These images depict a version of Los Angeles that has all but disappeared: Echo Park as a predominantly Latinx neighborhood rife with artists, writers, and performers full of flair and queer glamour. For Made in L.A. 2020, Rivera shares a selection from this archive, including intimate photographs from clubs (front of stage and back), bars, and house parties. A vital aspect of his ongoing project is remembering and lending visibility to a community of vibrant trans women and drag performers who often died tragically and young. His images of people who are missing from public ledgers and administrative records offer a reminder that L.A. is a place with a deep history and a short memory.
Art & Music
|
March 24, 2021
2021-03-24
|
Live
|
FREE
Lynette Yiadom-Boakye with Thelma Golden
-
Tate Britain
Gather with artist Lynette Yiadom-Boakye for this exclusive live online event. As Tate Britain presents the first major survey of the work of Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, this is a unique opportunity to hear the artist discuss her practice. Yiadom-Boakye will be in conversation with Thelma Golden, Director and Chief Curator of The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York City. There will also be an opportunity for questions from the audience.
Art & Music
|
March 29, 2021
2021-03-29
|
Live
|
FREE
Lynette Yiadom-Boakye: Poetic Responses
-
Tate Britain
Hear new writing inspired by the work of Lynette Yiadom-Boakye. This online event celebrates Lynette Yiadom-Boakye’s writing alongside work by leading and emerging writers. These works respond to her current Tate Britain exhibition. The evening includes a showcase of winning entries to a Tate Collective writing competition. There will also be a further invitation for audiences to develop their own future writing practices.
Reading & Writing
|
March 22, 2021
2021-03-22
|
Live
|
FREE
MUTINY: poems
-
Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard
Phillip B. Williams is researching, writing, and revising poems (title: “Mutiny”) and prose (title: “Threshold”). Within both genres, he hopes to research and explore Black folklore, African-diasporic mythologies and spiritual practices, and alternative ways of documenting Black selfhood outside of the human/nonhuman dichotomy.
Reading & Writing
|
March 31, 2021
2021-03-31
|
Live
|
FREE
Making and Tasting Historical Recipes: Early Modern Sweets
-
The Newberry Library
In this seminar, conducted as a cooking demonstration and workshop, we will study, prepare, and taste dishes made using early modern English recipes from manuscript and print sources. We will explore the background, methods, and meanings behind a few historic preparations for sweets and learn about pre-modern food culture through reading and interpreting recipes. Instructor Sarah Peters Kernan, Newberry Library Scholar-in-Residence, holds a PhD in medieval history from The Ohio State University. Her research focuses on cookbooks in medieval and early modern England. She is co-editor of The Recipes Project and collaborates regularly with the Newberry. (Note: Because this workshop is being offered online, participants will be able to select their level of engagement. You may choose to cook along in you own kitchens with any or all recipe preparations, or simply view the cooking demonstration. A digital course packet with recipes and accompanying ingredient lists will be included in the registration confirmation email.)
Food & Drink
|
March 20, 2021
2021-03-20
|
Live
|
50
Mark Bittman: Animal, Vegetable, Junk
-
Commonwealth Club
A century ago, food was industrialized. Since then, new styles of agriculture and food production have written a new chapter of human history, one that’s driving both climate change and global health crises. Best-selling food authority Mark Bittman will offer a panoramic view of the story and explain how we can rescue ourselves from the modern wrong turn. Mark Bittman has been a leading voice in global food culture and policy for more than three decades. Born in New York City in 1950, Bittman began writing professionally in 1978. After five years as a general assignment reporter, he turned all of his attention to food. His first cookbook, Fish: The Complete Guide to Buying and Cooking, was published in 1994 and remains in print; since then he has written or co-written thirty others, including the How to Cook Everything series. Bittman was a distinguished fellow at the University of California, Berkeley and a fellow at the Union of Concerned Scientists; he remains a fellow at Yale and is now on the faculty of Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. He has received six James Beard Awards, four IACP Awards, and numerous other honors. He is also the editor-in-chief of "The Mark Bittman Project," a newsletter and website focusing on all aspects of food, from political to delicious. His most recent book is his history of food and humanity, Animal, Vegetable, Junk.
Food & Drink
|
March 24, 2021
2021-03-24
|
Live
|
5
Marking Time: Indigenous Art from the NGV
-
National Gallery of Victoria
Marking Time: Indigenous Art from the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) looks at the persistence of images, signs or text painted or drawn on a range of surfaces in Indigenous Australia, from ancient times until now. The impulse to draw and make images and symbols is deeply embedded in Indigenous cultures throughout the world and is fundamental to the human experience. One of the first and most prolific forms of mark making, both figurative and non-figurative, has appeared across Australia on rock surfaces since the pre-historic era. Other forms of visual culture are ephemeral and comprise meaningful markings and designs made on the ground, the body and objects, for use in ceremonial contexts. The removal of such ritual markings from the body and the ground after ceremony, along with the loss of other more durable designs and images through natural processes, such as erosion, is compounded by other forms of loss through the socially fragmenting effects of colonisation. In response, Indigenous artists have found new ways of prolonging this visual language of images and signs, by reimagining it in new and more durable art forms, such as acrylic paintings, neons, sculptures and limited-edition prints. This exhibition reveals many nuances of mark making as an artistic practice in the Indigenous Australian context, with multiple aesthetic consequences and modes of practice. Join the museum director for a 5 part video tour through this important exhibition.
Art & Music
|
March 27, 2021
2021-03-27
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Mastering Breads with Nick Malgieri
-
92nd Street Y
Live online cooking instruction from today’s most exciting culinary figures--Basic Breads with Nick Malgieri. Baking bread is double enjoyment: mixing, kneading, and shaping the dough are relaxing and fun and eating your creations (all better and fresher than most breads you can buy) is the second pleasure. Join James Beard Award winning author and baking instructor Nick Malgieri for a 3-session class that covers bread basics and 3 delicious variations in each class plus the easy-to-master techniques that will turn you into a great bread baker. On April 5: We’ll cover ingredients and equipment with special emphasis on flour and yeast. Then we’ll prepare Best and Easiest Homemade Bread – made by hand as are the remaining breads in this class. Next up are a delicious Ligurian Focaccia and Rosemary Olive Knots. On April 12: The emphasis this week is on whole grains with Polenta and Parmigiano Bread, Whole Wheat Raisin Walnut bread, and Kyra’s Many-Seed Bread. And on April 19: In the concluding class we’ll prepare breads made with a flour-water-yeast sponge or pre-ferment that rises overnight before it’s used in dough. Apulian Olive Bread made with green Cerignola olives, American Pumpernickel Bread (to distinguish it from the German version that’s baked for many hours), and Carole Walter’s Challah. Classes will be recorded and will also be available for later viewing by all who register.
Food & Drink
|
April 5, 2021
2021-04-05
|
Live
|
120
Met Speaks: Arts of South and Southeast Asia—Luxury Goods: Ivory and Temple Decor in 18th–Century Sri Lanka
-
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Ivory has long been a favored luxury in Sri Lankan culture. Traditional uses of ivory include not only the crafting of secular luxury goods but also the embellishment of religious objects and temple architecture. In this talk, learn about a recently rediscovered ivory panel—now in The Met collection—that depicts a female temple dancer, and its companion panel in the collection of London's Victoria and Albert Museum. Free, but advance registration is required.
Art & Music
|
March 12, 2021
2021-03-12
|
Live
|
FREE
Met Speaks—Change and Continuity in the Sahel
-
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Join Met curator Alisa LaGamma for a conversation with Manthia Diawara, a writer, filmmaker, and leading scholar of the African diaspora, presented in conjunction with the exhibition Sahel: Art and Empires on the Shores of the Sahara. Explore the tensions between West Africa's traditions and modernity as LaGamma and Diawara draw from the exhibition and from one of Diawara's signature texts, In Search of Africa, which was shaped by his formative experiences in Guinea, Mali, and Senegal.
Art & Music
|
March 20, 2021
2021-03-20
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Miami Art Deco Virtual Walking Tour
-
92nd Street Y
Thanks to the Miami Design Preservation League, Miami remains home to the largest concentration of Art Deco architecture. We will explore the iconic buildings located on Lincoln Rd, Washington Ave., Collins Ave and of course Ocean Drive. Some of the buildings on this tour include the Colony Theater, The Fillmore, Miami Beach US Post Office, The Cadillac, the Breakwater, Hoffman Cafeteria Building and more. You will learn about the key features of Art Deco and the most famous architects. In addition you will learn what lead to the decline of Miami tourism in the 70s and 80s and the people responsible for saving these architectural gems from the wrecking ball.
Art & Music
|
March 19, 2021
2021-03-19
|
Live
|
20
Michelle Nijhuis in Conversation With Elena Passarello
-
Powell's City of Books
In the late 19th century, as humans came to realize that our rapidly industrializing and globalizing societies were driving other animal species to extinction, a movement to protect and conserve them was born. In Beloved Beasts (W. W. Norton), acclaimed science journalist Michelle Nijhuis traces the movement’s history: from early battles to save charismatic species such as the American bison and bald eagle to today’s global effort to defend life on a larger scale. Nijhuis describes the vital role of scientists and activists such as Aldo Leopold and Rachel Carson, as well as lesser-known figures in conservation history; she reveals the origins of vital organizations like the Audubon Society and the World Wildlife Fund; she explores current efforts to protect species such as the whooping crane and the black rhinoceros; and she confronts the darker side of conservation, long shadowed by racism and colonialism. As the destruction of other species continues and the effects of climate change escalate, Beloved Beasts charts the ways conservation is becoming a movement for the protection of all species — including our own. Nijhuis will be joined in conversation by Elena Passarello, author of Animals Strike Curious Poses.
Reading & Writing
|
March 12, 2021
2021-03-12
|
Live
|
FREE
Mind, Heart and Body: The Creative Process of Making Theater from a Director's Perspective
-
Harvard University
How does an actor transform into a character? What is the process that allows this transformation to happen? What is the role of the audience in completing the theatrical event? Join Diane Paulus, Professor of the Practice in Theater, Dance & Media and English at Harvard, for a behind the scenes look at the creative process of making theater. Please email the organizer for a Zoom link to the event.
Art & Music
|
March 15, 2021
2021-03-15
|
Live
|
FREE
Mindful Monday: Cultivating Empathy and Connectedness @ Home
-
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
LACMA is bringing experiences with works of art to you! Join us for Mindful Monday: Cultivating Empathy and Connectedness @ Home, led by LACMA educators Elizabeth Gerber and Alicia Vogl Saenz. In this live, virtual gathering, we will explore images of the natural world in LACMA's collection. The program will include opportunities for participants to share observations and reflections in the chat box along with guided meditation. This program is best enjoyed via the Zoom desktop application. The session will be recorded for internal archival purposes only. Attendees’ mics and cameras will not be activated. Free with advance registration.
Health & Wellness
|
March 22, 2021
2021-03-22
|
Live
|
FREE
Mindfulness & Medicine with Larry Brilliant & Jack Kornfield
-
City Arts & Lectures
A man who has always been in the right place at the right time, Larry Brilliant has engaged with some of the most prominent thought leaders, spiritual masters, heroes, and icons in the world–including Neem Karoli Baba (Maharajji), Martin Luther King, Jr., Steve Jobs, Mikhail Gorbachev, Wavy Gravy, the Grateful Dead, the Dalai Lama, and Barack Obama. Brilliant’s life’s journey across continents has resulted in the direct involvement of some of the most significant medical, spiritual, and social achievements of the past century: the eradication of smallpox in India, curing blindness in over 4 million people, introducing the teachings of the Maharajji to the Woodstock Generation, launching Google’s philanthropic enterprises, and more. In a new book, Sometimes Brilliant, he reflects on his remarkable life and his extraordinary experiences as a doctor, innovator, philanthropist, and cultural revolutionary. Jack Kornfield trained as a Buddhist monk in the monasteries of Thailand, India and Burma. He has taught meditation internationally since 1974 and was one of the key teachers to introduce Buddhist mindfulness practice to the West. After graduating from Dartmouth College in Asian Studies in 1967, he joined the Peace Corps and worked on rural health and tropical medicine teams in northeast Thailand, which is home to several of the world’s oldest Buddhist forest monasteries. After returning to the United States, Kornfield co-founded the Insight Meditation Society in Massachusetts. He is also a founding teacher of the Spirit Rock Center in Woodacre, California. Over the past 40 years, Kornfield has taught in centers and universities worldwide, led International Buddhist Teacher meetings with the Dalai Lama, and worked with many of the great teachers of our time. He holds a Ph.D. in clinical psychology and is a father and activist. His many books include The Wise Heart: A Guide to the Universal Teachings of Buddhist Psychology, A Path with Heart, and After the Ecstasy, the Laundry.
Health & Wellness
|
March 23, 2021
2021-03-23
|
Live
|
29
Mine!: How the Hidden Rules of Ownership Control Our Lives
-
Commonwealth Club
Gather with us for a virtual discussion with law professors Michael Heller and James Salzman to discuss the hidden set of rules that reveals how things become "mine"—the favorite word of every two-year-old. As adults, of course, the idea of ownership feels natural, whether we are buying a cup of coffee or a house. But who controls the space behind your airplane seat: your reclining self or the squished laptop user seated behind you? And why is plagiarism wrong, but it's okay to knock-off a recipe or a dress design? After a snowstorm, why does a chair in the street hold your parking space in Chicago, but in New York you lose both the space and the chair? Heller and Salzman explain these puzzles and many more using six simple stories that almost everyone uses to claim almost everything. And although choosing which story to use is often based on our most obvious legal rights, we can always pick a different story to use. This is true not just for airplane seats, but also for battles over digital privacy, climate change and wealth inequality. As Heller and Salzman demonstrate with stories that are eye-opening, mind-bending and sometimes infuriating, ownership is always up for grabs.
Reading & Writing
|
March 16, 2021
2021-03-16
|
Live
|
10
Mother Sauce: Sauce Tomate
-
18 Reasons
Classically, this French sauce would have a healthy amount of pork. Not tonight. This is Mother Sauce Mondays excursion to a vegetarian sauce. Of course, once we turn it into Sauce Piquant from Louisiana, and caress a load of fresh wild caught prawns In the sauce, it will no longer be vegetarian. But still. We will use a classic French sauce Tomate to dress some Italian pasta perfectly for the second dish. Tonight's menu: Wild Prawns with Sauce Piquant; Pasta with Classic Sauce Tomate.
Food & Drink
|
March 22, 2021
2021-03-22
|
Live
|
50
Mutualism: Building the Next Economy from the Ground Up: Book Talk with author Sara Horowitz
-
Aspen Institute
You are invited to a conversation featuring Sara Horowitz, Advisor to Ascend’s Family Prosperity Innovation Community and founder of Freelancer’s Union to discuss her new book Mutualism: Building the Next Economy from the Ground Up. Moderated by Mia Birdsong, Ascend Fellow, Senior Fellow, Economic Security Project.
Culture & Politics
|
March 10, 2021
2021-03-10
|
Live
|
FREE
NYPL Live: How Beautiful We Were: Imbolo Mbue
-
New York Public Library
The bestselling novelist returns with a heart-wrenching tale of conflict between corporate greed and community power. Set in the fictional African village of Kosawa, Imbolo Mbue's new novel tells of people living in fear amid environmental degradation wrought by an American oil company. Pipeline spills have rendered farmlands infertile. Children are dying from drinking toxic water. Promises of cleanup and financial reparations to the villagers are made—and ignored. The country's government, led by a brazen dictator, exists to serve its own interests. Left with few choices, the people of Kosawa decide to fight back. Their struggle will last for decades and come at a steep price. Imbolo Mbue discusses her latest novel's exploration of what happens when the reckless drive for profit, coupled with the ghost of colonialism, comes up against one community's determination to hold on to its ancestral land and a young woman's willingness to sacrifice everything for the sake of her people's freedom. Imbolo Mbue is the author of The New York Times bestseller Behold the Dreamers, which won the PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction and was an Oprah's Book Club selection. The novel has been translated into eleven languages, adapted into an opera and a stage play, and optioned for a miniseries. A native of Limbe, Cameroon, and a graduate of Rutgers and Columbia Universities, Imbolo Mbue lives in New York City.
Reading & Writing
|
March 30, 2021
2021-03-30
|
Live
|
FREE
NYPL Live: Taking a Long Look: Vivian Gornick with Margo Jefferson
-
New York Public Library
The beloved critic discusses fifty years of essays on literature, feminism, and knowing one's self. Collected from across her expansive career, Taking a Long Look demonstrates Vivian Gornick's characteristic clarity and vibrance, exploring feminism and writing, literature and culture, politics and personal experience. The book covers the lives of Alfred Kazin, Mary McCarthy, Diana Trilling, Philip Roth, Joan Didion, and Herman Melville; the cultural impact of Silent Spring and Uncle Tom's Cabin; and it brings back into print her incendiary essays, first published in the Village Voice, that championed the emergence of the women's liberation movement of the 1970s. Vivian Gornick speaks with Margo Jefferson about the collection and its glance back across a career that has made her one of America's most beloved critics.
Reading & Writing
|
March 16, 2021
2021-03-16
|
Live
|
FREE
Native Americans and the National Consciousness: Virtual Reading and Conversation with Joy Harjo
-
Harvard Art Museums
The Harvard University Native American Program and the Harvard Art Museums present a reading and conversation with Joy Harjo, the 23rd poet laureate of the United States. Harjo is an internationally renowned performer and writer, who is a member of the Mvskoke Nation and belongs to Oce Vpofv (Hickory Ground). The author of nine books of poetry, several plays and children’s books, and a memoir (Crazy Brave), she has received many honors, including the Ruth Lilly Prize for Lifetime Achievement from the Poetry Foundation, the Wallace Stevens Award from the Academy of American Poets, a PEN USA Literary Award, the Lila Wallace-Reader’s Digest Fund Writers’ Award, a Rasmuson U.S. Artists Fellowship, two NEA fellowships, and a Guggenheim fellowship. Harjo is chancellor of the Academy of American Poets and a founding board member of the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation. She is executive editor of the anthology When the Light of the World Was Subdued, Our Songs Came Through: A Norton Anthology of Native Nations Poetry, released in 2020. She lives in Tulsa, Oklahoma, where she is a Tulsa Artist Fellow.
Reading & Writing
|
April 5, 2021
2021-04-05
|
Live
|
FREE
Nazi-Looted Art
-
NYU School of Professional Studies
In the context of World War II and the Holocaust, the National Socialists perpetrated the greatest theft of art and cultural property in history, with hundreds of thousands of objects still missing from their rightful owners. This course examines Nazi ideology, including the purge of modern art as “degenerate.” It looks in depth at systematic looting across Europe between 1933 and 1945, especially the plunder of Jewish collections as a mechanism of persecution. It also considers postwar military spoliation and the work of the Allied “Monuments Men.” Also, gain an introduction to the fundamental principles and methods of researching the history of ownership, or provenance, of an artwork. Through a discussion of case studies, grapple with the ethical and legal questions of restitution still faced by the art world today.
Art & Music
|
March 10, 2021
2021-03-10
|
Live
|
499
New Thinking in a Pandemic: Business, Economics, and Inclusion
-
UC Berkeley
What will be the political legacy of the Coronavirus pandemic? Will COVID-19 renew or diminish public trust in science? How will the crisis shape “Gen Z”—those who are coming of age during the pandemic? In conversation with Professor Pierre-Oliver Gourinchas, the S.K. and Angela Chan Professor of Global Management, political science and economics Professor Barry Eichengreen shared his recent research on how the coronavirus pandemic might significantly reduce trust in political institutions and science for decades to come, and leave long-lasting scars on the next generation.
Culture & Politics
|
March 26, 2021
2021-03-26
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
NightSchool: Adventures in Botany
-
California Academy of Sciences
Who says botanists can’t have a little fun and a lot of adventure? Join Nathalie Nagalingum, cycad expert and the Academy’s Curator of Botany, as she hosts fellow botanists and asks them to regale you with tales of tracking down plants and blooms all around the world.
Science & Nature
|
April 1, 2021
2021-04-01
|
Live
|
FREE
NightSchool: Extreme Science
-
California Academy of Sciences
Not all science is done in the lab. Scientists go to great lengths, and sometimes extremely dangerous ones, to get answers to their questions. Hear the thrilling tales of several researchers and how they approach their work by land, sea, and air.
Science & Nature
|
March 18, 2021
2021-03-18
|
Live
|
FREE
NightSchool: Missions to Mars
-
California Academy of Sciences
Mars is hot right now, despite its sub-freezing temperatures. With multiple countries sending spacecraft to the Red Planet this year, we’ll take a look at missions past and future, their breakthroughs and challenges, and what we hope to find when we get there.
Science & Nature
|
April 8, 2021
2021-04-08
|
Live
|
FREE
NightSchool: The Great Gray Whale Migration
-
California Academy of Sciences
The California coast is renowned for its whale-watching, and spring's the perfect time to spot gray whales migrating north. To mark the occasion, join us for an evening exploring the science of gray whales and their annual 10,000-mile journey.
Science & Nature
|
March 25, 2021
2021-03-25
|
Live
|
FREE
NightSchool: Wolves
-
California Academy of Sciences
Get to know the wolf, one of North America’s most iconic terrestrial mammals and important predators—as well as one of its most controversial species. We’ll dig into wolf history and ecology, scientific classification, and the complicated relationship between wolves and humans.
Science & Nature
|
March 11, 2021
2021-03-11
|
Live
|
FREE
Off the Shelf: Author Talk with Rachel Williams
-
University of North Carolina
In the heat of June in 1943, a wave of destructive and deadly civil unrest took place in the streets of Detroit. The city was under the pressures of both wartime industrial production and the nascent civil rights movement, setting the stage for massive turmoil and racial violence. With “Run Home If You Don’t Want to Be Killed,” Rachel Marie-Crane Williams delivers a graphic retelling of the racism and tension leading up to the violence of those summer days. By incorporating firsthand accounts collected by the NAACP and telling them through a combination of hand-drawn images, historical dialogue and narration, Williams makes the history and impact of these events immediate, and in showing us what happened, she reminds us that many issues of the time — police brutality, state-sponsored oppression, economic disparity, white supremacy — plague our country to this day. Williams is associate professor of art and art history, and gender, women’s and sexuality studies, at the University of Iowa. This virtual event will be hosted by Josh Hockensmith, Art Library technical assistant at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University Libraries. This talk is part of Off the Shelf, a collaboration between the University Libraries and the UNC Press to present new works on racial and social justice in our history and our world. The talk is co-presented by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University and Arts Everywhere at UNC-Chapel Hill.
Reading & Writing
|
April 22, 2021
2021-04-22
|
Live
|
FREE
On the Road @ Graham: A Four Part Film Discussion Series
-
University of Chicago Graham School
Many of us may be hesitant to travel at the moment, or even to go to the movies; but we can gather to discuss some great films set on the highways and byways. As the recent theatrical release of Nomadland testifies, the American road movie has enduring appeal and seems almost endlessly adaptable to different cultural circumstances. In this four part series we will take a very quick survey of the genre, from a Hollywood studio classic which established the couple as central protagonist and self-determination as a defining force, to a contemporary entry which confronts us with an urgent new take on some of the central concerns in these movies. While this course is designed as a series, the discussions will be focused on the individual films, and participants are welcome to join for any or all sessions. Spread out between April and early June, the four films to be discussed are: It Happened One Night; Bonnie and Clyde; Thelma & Louise; and Queen & Slim. WHAT TO EXPECT: Participants are asked to watch the film in advance using the guiding questions to help prepare for the discussion evening. At the start of each event, the host will explain the format for the evening, provide some additional context, and lead a brief introductory discussion of the film. Participants will then be broken out into smaller groups to discuss the guiding questions, and each evening will conclude with the entire group reconvening and the host providing some final commentary or questions for additional consideration. Registration is free, but you must register for each film discussion separately. You will find all of the registration links on the main event page.
Film & Photography
|
April 1, 2021
2021-04-01
|
Live
|
FREE
On ‘Caste’: A Virtual Conversation with Isabel Wilkerson
-
Williams College
Isabel Wilkerson, winner of the Pulitzer Prize and the National Humanities Medal, is the author of The New York Times bestsellers The Warmth of Other Suns and Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents. A gifted storyteller, Wilkerson captivates audiences with the universal human story of migration and reinvention, as well as the unseen hierarchies that have divided us as a nation, in order to find a way to transcend them. She has become an impassioned voice for demonstrating how history can help us understand ourselves, our country and our current era of upheaval. Her latest book, Caste: The Origins of our Discontents, published in August 2020 to critical acclaim, examines the unspoken caste system that has shaped America and shows how a hierarchy of social divisions still defines our lives today. Wilkerson brings the past’s complexities to vivid life through her passionate research and her profound gift for connecting with audiences of all backgrounds. Caste is being adapted into a Netflix film directed, written, and produced by Ava DuVernay.
Reading & Writing
|
March 16, 2021
2021-03-16
|
Live
|
FREE
Online Class: African Art at the Barnes Foundation: Context and Meanings
-
Barnes Foundation
This class will discuss the traditional meanings and uses of the African sculpture collected by Dr. Albert C. Barnes. We will also consider the impact of colonialism and imperialism which resulted in the dissemination of African material culture and popularized the cultures that are represented in the Barnes collection.
Art & Music
|
April 9, 2021
2021-04-09
|
Live
|
220
Online Class: Introduction to Contemporary Art: Critical Explorations
-
Barnes Foundation
What makes art “contemporary?” The answers to this question are complex, varied, and even contradictory—much like contemporary art itself. This course examines art from 1970 to the present to highlight the shift from modern to postmodern practices. Surveying a wide range of media and artistic strategies, the course navigates thematic topics that ground contemporary art in historical, aesthetic, political, and social contexts. Each week, the main lecture is followed by a 30-minute discussion session that allows students the opportunity to ask questions and exchange ideas with the instructor and classmates.
Art & Music
|
March 10, 2021
2021-03-10
|
Live
|
220
Online Class: On the Run: European Artists/Intellectuals Flee WWII
-
Barnes Foundation
What does it mean to leave your homeland, often unexpectedly and during unknown circumstances? How does being exiled impact arts and ideas? This course probes these questions through an examination of key artists and intellectuals who fled Europe during the Second World War. Delve into the zeitgeist, or “spirit of the times,” and trace the war’s impact on the art communities of Paris. Explore the influence of exiled Europeans on their younger American contemporaries, as well as the work of artists who stayed behind, all in a shifting superpowers of ideas.
Art & Music
|
March 8, 2021
2021-03-08
|
Live
|
220
Online Class: The Arts of Medieval Islam
-
Barnes Foundation
The advent of Islam in the seventh century and its rapid expansion across the Mediterranean stunned the medieval world. This class introduces students to the arts of Islam with a focus on the rich artistic traditions and architectural achievements of its formative medieval period (c. 7th–16th centuries). Throughout the course, we will address issues of politics, religious devotion, and the development of museum collections as they relate to this fascinatingly complex world.
Art & Music
|
April 8, 2021
2021-04-08
|
Live
|
220
Online Course: Drawing
-
Guggenheim Museums
This series of drawing workshops led by artist and educator Stina Puotinen is designed to connect participants with their own creativity while engaging with the Guggenheim’s collection. Through conversation and observation, the four-part class will cover a range of artists, from Marc Chagall to Kara Walker, with a focus on drawing methods and materials. Works discussed will inspire art-making prompts for participants to explore drawing through play and experimentation, using a range of techniques. A list of materials required for this course can be found on the registration page. This list outlines all the art supplies needed for each of the four sessions, and doubles as a helpful starter kit for those interested in pursuing art-making beyond this course. All items can be purchased directly at this link, or through your preferred retailer. All course sessions will be led virtually through Zoom, a free video conferencing software. A Zoom link and password will be emailed ahead of the course. All times listed in Eastern Time (ET). March 26: All about Abstraction; April 2: Lines and Layers; April 9: Mark Making, Meaning Making ; April 16: Faces and Figures.
Art & Music
|
March 26, 2021
2021-03-26
|
Live
|
120
Online Course: Living Art and Architecture at the Guggenheim Museum
-
Guggenheim Museums
Learn more about how the Guggenheim was built at a human scale in order to center the visitors’ experience of the space and the artworks shown within. Join educator Queena Ko for weekly Tuesday sessions on the history and evolution of the Guggenheim building and discover how the museum’s collection of non-objective art has expanded to include over 1,700 artworks by more than 625 artists. Over the course of four weeks, participants will collectively explore the intersection of art and architecture through recent exhibitions, site-specific interventions, and global initiatives at the Guggenheim. Learners from all backgrounds are invited to be participate in this collaborative online learning experience through live group sessions and independent creative response, with optional readings and creative activities. All course sessions will be led virtually through Zoom, a free video conferencing software. A Zoom link and password will be emailed ahead of the course. All times listed in Eastern Time (ET). April 6: Building the Guggenheim; April 13: Exhibitions at the Guggenheim; April 20: Local Impact; April 27: Global Impact.
Art & Music
|
April 6, 2021
2021-04-06
|
Live
|
160
Online Course: Spatial Awareness
-
Guggenheim Museums
Since its inception in the 1930s, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation has often exhibited its modern and contemporary collection works in unusual environments—from Solomon R. Guggenheim’s apartment at the Plaza Hotel to an incensed-filled gallery with gray velour walls, to the iconic Frank Lloyd Wright rotunda the museum calls home today. Led by educator Jackiie Popjes, this three-part course uses multimedia resources, archival materials, and live group discussion to consider the history of Guggenheim exhibition spaces and the relationship of space to the artworks on view. The course will begin by establishing a foundation of the various components at play in the architecture and history of the Guggenheim. We will thenconsider how everything—from the signature sloping terrazzo ramps to the soaring oculus—influences a visitor’s experience with art, as well as how exhibitions are made in this iconic structure. Participants will gain insights on topics ranging from installation art and its power to radically transform space, to how exactly an eccentric 19th–century author and critic shaped the design of a 2017 Guggenheim exhibition. Learners from all backgrounds and experiences are invited to enroll and illuminate how the context of space impacts our relationships with art inside museums and beyond.  All course sessions will be led virtually through Zoom. A Zoom link and password will be emailed ahead of the course.
Art & Music
|
March 11, 2021
2021-03-11
|
Live
|
120
Online Learning Lecture: Painting, Architecture, and Public Imagination
-
Whitney Museum of American Art
Looking ahead to Julie Mehretu’s upcoming Whitney exhibition, teaching fellow Ayanna Dozier will explore the relationship between architecture and art from the mid-twentieth century to the present. Alongside paintings by Mehretu, the lecture will consider works by Mark Rothko, Isamu Noguchi, Gordon Matta-Clark, David Hammons, and Lorna Simpson. Architectural and urban design organize the zones within which we reside, work, and interact. By shaping our space, these practices also shape attitudes and frame perception, giving rise to a shared public imagination—our sense of who belongs in or to a space. Artists who have drawn architecture into artmaking provide new ways to approach this dynamic with greater understanding and agency. When brought into the realm of art, architecture becomes charged with expansive political potential.
Art & Music
|
March 10, 2021
2021-03-10
|
Live
|
FREE
Online Lecture: A Garden for All Seasons
-
US Botanic Garden
Explore the stories behind Hillwood's extraordinary gardens and celebrate the publication of A Garden for All Seasons: Marjorie Merriweather Post's Hillwood. Kate Markert, author and executive director of Hillwood, delved into the archives to describe Post’s approach to creating this enchanting environment of mansion and gardens. Photographer Erik Kvalsvik worked with Markert for over two years to photograph the estate in every season, in many different weather conditions and times of day, to illustrate in gorgeous color the result of modern horticulturalists' labors and Post’s original vision. This lecture highlights the book’s themes, illustrated by stunning new photography.
Science & Nature
|
March 11, 2021
2021-03-11
|
Live
|
FREE
Online Lunch Conversation for Beginners in French
-
Alliance Francaise SF
Join us for an Online Lunch Conversation in French (for Beginners)! On Tuesdays, every month. Enjoy the lunch break to have your first conversations in French! Each month, we encourage you to talk on different subjects to practice your spoken skills. A screen shouldn’t keep us from chatting and sharing a lunch together! The Lunch Conversation is lead by our French teacher, Coline.
Culture & Politics
|
March 16, 2021
2021-03-16
|
Live
|
10
Online Talk: How Can Art Resist Fascism? Dr. Barnes and Joan Miró in the 1930s
-
Barnes Foundation
This lecture by Brandon Truett, Humanities Teaching Fellow at the University of Chicago, begins with the story of how Dr. Albert C. Barnes became interested in the Spanish Civil War (1936–39), a bloody conflict that drew widespread attention to the international struggle against fascism. Dr. Barnes’s commitment to anti-fascism later motivated his decision to purchase two paintings by the Spanish artist Joan Miró. See how these politically charged paintings represent the horrors of aerial bombings.
Art & Music
|
March 20, 2021
2021-03-20
|
Live
|
FREE
Operas that Changed the World
-
University of Chicago Graham School
Gather with others and the University of Chicago's Graham School for a daylong seminar covering genre-changing works from 1642 to 1925 -- from Monteverdi's Poppea to Berg's Lulu.
Art & Music
|
April 10, 2021
2021-04-10
|
Live
|
135
Osher Mini Med School: Out of this World Healthcare: Space Medicine and Its Influence on Earth
-
UCSF
UCSF has a long history of pioneering biomedical research and a bold vision for advancing health worldwide. This innovative program will provide insights into the complexities of optimizing human health and medical management in Space. Current knowledge of human health risks in Space will be presented as will research and innovations to minimize negative consequences of Space travel. Knowledge of physical and behavioral adaptations to Human Space Exploration and the countermeasures to these has deepened our understanding of many medical conditions. Pioneering research and development of innovative solutions for Space travel are informing terrestrial health care, advancing our capabilities in remote medical management and informing the future practice of medicine. In presentations by space health experts, including astronauts, clinicians, scientists, engineers, health tech innovators and NASA thought leaders, we will share how space-associated science and technology can accelerate medical innovation and provide health benefits universally. This week: A True Wilderness - Working at an Altitude of 400,000 Meters.
Science & Nature
|
March 10, 2021
2021-03-10
|
Live
|
12
Our Changing Menu: Climate Change and the Foods We Love and Need
-
Cornell University
Climate change is a recipe for disaster. Whether you’re a home cook or a master chef, backyard gardener or professional grower, the yields, flavors, nutritional content, and cost of what you eat are already being impacted, according to Our Changing Menu: Climate Change and the Foods We Love and Need (Cornell University Press, 2021), a book that celebrates the power of food and tackles what is arguably the greatest challenge of our time. In a live, virtual Chats in the Stacks talk, authors Michael Hoffmann, professor emeritus; Carrie Koplinka-Loehr, freelance writer with a master’s in science education from Cornell; and Danielle Eiseman, visiting lecturer in the Cornell Department of Communication, will unpack the increasingly complex relationships between food and our changing climate, giving us insight into both the roots of the problem and how to plant the seeds of solutions.
Food & Drink
|
April 15, 2021
2021-04-15
|
Live
|
FREE
Overcoming Challenges: Women in the Military
-
National Archives of the United States
Broadcast journalist Soledad O’Brien will moderate a discussion about the evolution of women’s roles and responsibilities in the U.S. Armed Forces. Originally forbidden to serve on the battlefield, women in the military gradually won victories: more responsibilities and access to all the service academies and basic training. Finally in 2015, women were finally permitted to take part in leadership roles and physical combat, putting them on equal footing with their male counterparts. Joining O’Brien will be Heather A. Wilson, former Secretary of the Air Force; retired Brig. Gen. Kristin K. French; and Lt. Madison Hovren.
Culture & Politics
|
March 31, 2021
2021-03-31
|
Live
|
FREE
Pandora
-
Getty
Tune in to a virtual reading of award-winning writer and director Laurel Ollstein's new script Pandora, presented in partnership with TheatreWorks Silicon Valley. This theatrical retelling of the first human female to appear in Greek mythology asks: What if a woman was suddenly created and dropped into the middle of the world now? Someone with no preconceived notions of anything—like beauty, love, or violence? And what if the rest of humanity and the gods could suddenly see the world through those clear eyes? About Theatreworks Silicon Valley: Led by artistic director Tim Bond and executive director Phil Santora, the Palo Alto-based theater company serves more than 100,000 patrons per year and has captured a national reputation for artistic innovation and integrity, often presenting Bay Area theatergoers with their first look at acclaimed musicals, comedies, and dramas. In June 2019, TheatreWorks Silicon Valley received the Regional Theatre Tony Award, the highest honor bestowed on an American theater not on Broadway. Since its founding in 1970, TheatreWorks Silicon Valley has become one of the nation's leaders in cultivating and producing new musicals and plays, developing and premiering 70 works by new and veteran artists and 173 regional premieres. The company's New Works Festival and Writers' Retreat programs attract authors and composers of national stature (Rajiv Joseph, Stephen Schwartz, Beth Henley, Paul Gordon, Marsha Norman, Henry Krieger, Duncan Sheik, Jules Feiffer, Joe DiPietro, and Andrew Lippa, among many others), providing an artistic home in which America's theater artists can create new works. In addition, the company has developed scores of works which have gone on to regional, Off-Broadway, Broadway and West End productions.
Art & Music
|
March 12, 2021
2021-03-12
|
Live
|
FREE
Pen, Ink and Beyond
-
92nd Street Y
Perfect class for beginners or the more experienced student who wishes to attain a greater mastery of their craft. This online class is dedicated to guiding students towards mastering pen, ink, brush and color washes and towards introducing students to the work of sepia masters like Da Vinci, the Expressionists and modernists like Raymond Pettibon. Develop a series of drawings (utilizing expressionistic contour, cross hatching, pointillism, color wash and dry brush) that utilizes the full potential of ink. There will be a demo of all materials and an expanded list available in the first day of class.
Art & Music
|
March 14, 2021
2021-03-14
|
Live
|
155
Pi (π) Day Celebration
-
Exploratorium
No matter how you slice it, you won’t want to miss Pi (π) Day—we’ll be celebrating differently this year, but you can still join the party for this irrational and transcendent figure. Math artist John Sims will host a live listening session featuring work from his music project 31415: The Pi Collection. This performance will present his work: "Pi Day Anthem" video, a spoken-word "Dear Pi" letter, and the world premiere of a new "Jazz Pi" composition. Then join our panel of pi enthusiasts dishing out bites of pi trivia and pi art (along with a side of puns and pi-kus), and ask your questions and share your pi stories in the live chat.
Science & Nature
|
March 14, 2021
2021-03-14
|
Live
|
FREE
Poetry Workshop
-
Emory Continuing Education
Where do poems come from? Join us as we explore how contemporary poets have taken everyday experience and timeless themes (myth, loss, the world of nature) and shaped them into poems that speak to their readers. We’ll talk about strategies for revision, the secret weapon of any successful poet. Our class will have a dual focus on both reading and writing poetry, using as example and inspiration poems by the leading poets writing today. There will be writing assignments every week, with opportunities to share your work with the class. Limited to 12 students. After completing this course, participants will be able to: Identify the elements of craft (rhythm, rhyme scheme, sound effects, imagery) in poems by established poets, a skill that will enhance your own writing; Recognize possibilities for poetry in everyday experience and observation, as well as in their own memories and imagination; and Approach revision more systematically.
Reading & Writing
|
March 9, 2021
2021-03-09
|
Live
|
425
Post Live: A Conversation with U.N. Secretary General António Guterres
-
The Washington Post
A raging pandemic, crippling economic crisis and the looming threat of climate change have left the world’s nations scrambling for solutions. COVID-19 has deepened wealth and gender inequality and threatens basic standards of living for the most vulnerable populations. On Wednesday, U.N. Secretary General António Guterres joins Washington Post columnist David Ignatius to discuss vaccine rollout, geopolitical stability and how the United Nations is encouraging countries to work together to face the most intractable problems of our time.
Culture & Politics
|
March 24, 2021
2021-03-24
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Post Live: International Women’s Day: Hillary Rodham Clinton
-
The Washington Post
Secretary Hillary Rodham Clinton is one of the world’s most dedicated champions of women’s rights. As a former secretary of state, U.S. senator, first lady and presidential candidate, Clinton leveled the playing field for women in leadership, and her message of progress and resilience continues to inspire the next generation. Clinton joins Washington Post opinions writer Jonathan Capehart on International Women’s Day, Monday, March 8 at 2:00pm ET.
Culture & Politics
|
March 8, 2021
2021-03-08
|
Live
|
FREE
Presidential Library Series: Harry S. Truman
-
National Archives of the United States
Gather with us for the next installment of our Presidential Library Series. Our Executive Director Patrick Madden will host Harry S. Truman Presidential Library Director Kurt Graham for a discussion on the life and legacy of the 33rd President of the United States.
Reading & Writing
|
March 10, 2021
2021-03-10
|
Live
|
FREE
Rabbi Jonathan Sacks on Morality
-
Chicago Humanities Festival
"If we care for the future of democracy, we must recover that sense of shared morality that binds us to one another,” writes the late Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks, former UK Chief Rabbi, in most recent book Morality, published in the year before his passing. Sacks contends “we are living through a cultural climate change,” in which relying on competition-based institutions like the market and the state poses a threat to building a caring and compassionate society. Join Rabbi Sacks and Yale law professor Amy Chua for a conversation about restoring the common good in these divided times from September, 2020.
Culture & Politics
|
December 30, 2020
2020-12-30
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Race in America: Ending Poverty
-
The Washington Post
Wes Moore is CEO of the Robin Hood Foundation, the largest anti-poverty force in New York City, funding more than 200 organizations to build equality and lift families out of poverty. In the age of the COVID-19 pandemic, Moore joins The Post's Michele Norris to discuss the opportunity for business to support philanthropy while also answering calls for social justice.
Culture & Politics
|
March 15, 2021
2021-03-15
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Race in America: The Arts with Mellon Foundation's Elizabeth Alexander
-
The Washington Post
As the nation reckons with long-standing issues of race and inequality, some of America’s most powerful philanthropic organizations are shifting their missions to focus on social justice. Elizabeth Alexander, president of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, joins Washington Post Live to discuss a new multi-million dollar investment as part of the strategic transformation of the arts and humanities foundation. Alexander will also share her overall vision for harnessing philanthropy for social justice in conversation with Washington Post opinions writer Jonathan Capehart.
Art & Music
|
March 23, 2021
2021-03-23
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Race, Racism, and the Making of American History
-
92nd Street Y
Join Christina Proenza-Coles, author of American Founders: How People of African Descent Established Freedom in the New World, and Elizabeth Stordeur Pryor, daughter of comedic icon Richard Pryor and author of Colored Travelers: Mobility and the Fight for Citizenship Before the Civil War, for a timely and thought-provoking program that looks at how we think and talk about race, racism, and history in America—the words we use and the words we avoid, the stories we tell and those we forget, and the people who are included in or excluded from our national narrative.
Culture & Politics
|
March 11, 2021
2021-03-11
|
Live
|
15
Rachel Kushner in Conversation with Heidi Julavits
-
City Arts & Lectures
Rachel Kushner is the bestselling author of The Flamethrowers, a finalist for the National Book Award and a New York Times Top Ten Book of 2013; Telex from Cuba, a finalist for the National Book Award; and, most recently, The Mars Room, which was a finalist for the Man Booker Prize and the National Book Critics Award, winner of the Prix Médicis, selected by the National Book Foundation for its “Literature for Justice” award, and a winner of the California Book Award. She has received grants and prizes from the Guggenheim Foundation and the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and her fiction and essays have appeared in The New Yorker and The New York Times Magazine. Heidi Julavits is the founding editor of Believer magazine, and the author of four novels, including The Vanishers and The Uses of Enchantment. Her fiction has appeared in The Best American Short Stories, McSweeney’s, Zoetrope All-Story and elsewhere. She is a professor of creative writing at Columbia University.
Reading & Writing
|
April 29, 2021
2021-04-29
|
Live
|
29
Re-Classifying History by Catherine Wagner
-
The de Young Museum
To inaugurate the opening of the remodeled de Young Museum by Herzog and de Meuron, artist Catherine Wagner was asked to create a body of work from the collection that rested in storage during construction. In this special conversation, join Wagner and Janna Keegan, Assistant Curator of Contemporary Art and Programming, as they take a look back at this 2005 inaugural exhibition and other events throughout the 125 years of the de Young Museum.
Art & Music
|
March 24, 2021
2021-03-24
|
Live
|
FREE
Read the Revolution: Founding Friendships with Cassandra Good
-
Museum of the American Revolution
Abigail Adams called her friend Thomas Jefferson “one of the choice ones on earth,” while George Washington signed a letter to his friend Elizabeth Willing Powel with the words “I am always Yours.” In Founding Friendships: Friendships Between Men and Women in the Early American Republic, Dr. Cassandra A. Good shines a light on the men and women who took risks to form friendships with each other during the Revolutionary era, challenging social expectations but embracing founding ideals of freedom, choice, and equality in the early United States. Although they were both fraught with social danger and deeply political, Good argues that these friendships embodied the core values of the new nation and represented a transitional moment in gender and culture. In this virtual presentation, Good will discuss how individuals in the founding generation, including Mercy Otis Warren, Nelly Parke Custis, and others discussed in the Museum's current special exhibition When Women Lost the Vote: A Revolutionary Story, 1776-1807, defined and experienced friendship, love, gender, and power through her analysis of diaries, novels, letters, and etiquette books. Museum President & CEO Dr. R. Scott Stephenson will facilitate a live Q&A with the virtual audience.
Reading & Writing
|
March 9, 2021
2021-03-09
|
Live
|
7
Rebecca Solnit in Conversation With Jia Tolentino
-
Powell's City of Books
In Recollections of My Nonexistence (Penguin), Rebecca Solnit, author of A Field Guide to Getting Lost and Men Explain Things to Me, describes her formation as a writer and as a feminist in 1980s San Francisco, in an atmosphere of gender violence on the street and throughout society and the exclusion of women from cultural arenas. She tells of being poor, hopeful, and adrift in the city that became her great teacher, and of the small apartment that, when she was 19, became the home in which she transformed herself. She explores the forces that liberated her as a person and as a writer — books themselves; the gay community that presented a new model of what else gender, family, and joy could mean; and her eventual arrival in the spacious landscapes and overlooked conflicts of the American West. Beyond being a memoir, Recollections of My Nonexistence is also a passionate argument: that women are not just impacted by personal experience, but by membership in a society where violence against women pervades. Looking back, she describes how she came to recognize that her own experiences of harassment and menace were inseparable from the systemic problem of who has a voice, or rather who is heard and respected and who is silenced — and how she was galvanized to use her own voice for change. Solnit will be joined in conversation by Jia Tolentino, staff writer at the New Yorker and author of the essay collection, Trick Mirror. Please note: This is a ticketed event. Purchasing a preorder copy of Recollections of My Nonexistence ($16) entitles you to attend the virtual event.
Reading & Writing
|
March 9, 2021
2021-03-09
|
Live
|
16
Rediscovering Eleanor Roosevelt
-
Library of Congress
Author David Michaelis’ “Eleanor” is the first major biography of America’s longest-serving first lady in 60 years. Much of its research was conducted in the Library’s Manuscript Division, including the papers of the NAACP and the National Women’s Trade League, as well as the personal papers of Kermit and Belle Roosevelt, Theodore Roosevelt Jr. and Edith Bolling Galt Wilson, second wife of President Wilson. Colleen Shogan, senior vice president and director of the David M. Rubenstein Center at the White House Historical Association, will talk to Michaelis and Manuscript Division staff about the book and its creation. This is part of Made at the Library, a series which highlights books that have been substantially written using the Library of Congress’s extraordinary collections.
Reading & Writing
|
March 18, 2021
2021-03-18
|
Live
|
FREE
Regressing to Eugenics? Technologies and Histories of Recognition
-
National Humanities Center
As part of "In Our Image: Artificial Intelligence and the Humanities," a virtual conference exploring the critical intersection between the humanities and artificial intelligence, gather with us for the keynote address: “Regressing to Eugenics? Technologies and Histories of Recognition,” with Wendy Chun, Canada 150 Research Chair in New Media, Simon Fraser University.
Science & Nature
|
April 14, 2021
2021-04-14
|
Live
|
FREE
Reimagining Liberation: How Black Women Transformed Citizenship in the French Empire
-
The University of Michigan
Black women living in the French empire played a key role in the decolonial movements of the mid-twentieth century. As thinkers and activists, these women lived lives of commitment and risk that landed them in war zones and concentration camps and saw them declared enemies of the state. Annette K. Joseph-Gabriel mines published writings and untapped archives to reveal the anticolonialist endeavors of seven women. Though often overlooked today, Suzanne Césaire, Paulette Nardal, Eugénie Éboué-Tell, Jane Vialle, Andrée Blouin, Aoua Kéita, and Eslanda Robeson took part in a forceful transnational movement. Their activism and thought challenged France's imperial system by shaping forms of citizenship that encouraged multiple cultural and racial identities. Expanding the possibilities of belonging beyond national and even Francophone borders, these women imagined new pan-African and pan-Caribbean identities informed by black feminist intellectual frameworks and practices. The visions they articulated also shifted the idea of citizenship itself, replacing a single form of collective identity and political participation with an expansive plurality of forms of belonging.
Reading & Writing
|
March 12, 2021
2021-03-12
|
Live
|
FREE
Religion and Politics in 20th Century America
-
University of Chicago Graham School
This one quarter discussion course will examine the relationship between Public Religion (that is, religion that impacts law and politics) and Politics in America, in the 20th Century, from roughly the 1890s to 2020.
Culture & Politics
|
March 29, 2021
2021-03-29
|
Live
|
425
Remote Work Works: The Office After COVID-19
-
Aspen Institute
“We are not in a rush to pull people back into the workplace,” says Rob Falzon, vice chair of Prudential Financial. With an emphasis on confronting worker stress and buoying company culture, Prudential helped its 20,000 US-based employees adapt to the pandemic by leveraging its online Skills Accelerator platform to continue professional development, increasing access to mental health care, and providing extra support for juggling remote-work obstacles. Falzon joins Heather Landy, executive editor at Quartz, to discuss data from Prudential’s “Pulse of the American Worker Survey: Work in Progress—Six Months Living the Future of Work,” conducted by Morning Consult. Based on key findings, Falzon confirms that remote work does work, and suggests that the post-pandemic working environment should be a hybrid, where office walls are torn down to promote collaboration space and there’s flexibility to do individualized work at home.
Culture & Politics
|
March 11, 2021
2021-03-11
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Reuben Jonathan Miller
-
City Arts & Lectures
Reuben Jonathan Miller is a sociologist, criminologist and a social worker who teaches at the University of Chicago in the School of Social Service Administration where he studies and writes about race, democracy, and the social life of the city. His book, Halfway Home: Race, Punishment, and the Afterlife of Mass Incarceration, shows that the American justice system was not created to rehabilitate, and how parole is structured to keep classes of Americans impoverished, unstable, and disenfranchised long after they’ve paid their debt to society. Miller has been a member at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton New Jersey, a fellow at the New America Foundation and the Rockefeller Foundation, and a visiting scholar at the University of Texas at Austin and Dartmouth College. A native son of Chicago, he lives with his wife and children on the city’s Southside.
Reading & Writing
|
March 8, 2021
2021-03-08
|
Live
|
FREE
Root Cellar Salute: Celebrating Root Vegetables
-
18 Reasons
Root vegetables are sturdy staples that belong in everyone’s pantry. They last a long time, are very affordable, and oh so delicious. Many members of this family possess a subtle, well mannered sweetness that gets along easily with a wide range of ingredients and flavor profiles. However, what exactly are you supposed to do with them other than roasting? Join us for an innovative class that will teach you: How to create a bright and herby soup that balances the earthiness of beets; The virtues and nuances of the overlooked rutabaga; How to create a baked good that is flourless and composed largely of sweet potatoes (and no one but you will know!). As we close winter behind us and eagerly anticipate spring's bounty, let's salute faithful root vegetables and give them one last time to shine. The menu for this class includes: Golden Beet Borschtt; Rutabaga, Cheddar, Apple & Thyme Tart; Sweet Potato Quickbread with Seeded Crumble.
Food & Drink
|
March 26, 2021
2021-03-26
|
Live
|
50
Seeing Like a Camera
-
The International Center of Photography
In this one-day online workshop, participants explore creative strategies for dynamic imagemaking. Topics include: identifying innovative camera angles, utilizing the quality of light, and harnessing the power of color to set the mood. Open to all skill levels. Please have your Digital SLR or Mirrorless camera or smartphone ready to shoot during the online session.
Film & Photography
|
March 9, 2021
2021-03-09
|
Live
|
80
Self-Care and Thriving During Physical Distancing
-
UCLA Extension
This three session workshop will provide participants with an overview of the importance of self-care, placed within the context of challenges related to social distancing. A blend of research-based approaches to self-care and practical suggestions for managing a changing work and personal landscape in order to enhance wellness will equip attendees to modify existing practices or develop new methods for thriving during uncertainty. The course meetings will be offered via remote synchronous delivery with voluntary interactive components to enhance the attendee learning experience. The three-part course will cover: 1. Principles of Self-Care and Wellness; 2. Mindfulness Practices; 3. Additional Components of a Healthy Lifestyle: Sleep, Nutrition, and Exercise.
Health & Wellness
|
April 15, 2021
2021-04-15
|
Live
|
FREE
Shakespeare Hour Live: Shakespeare and the Environment
-
Shakespeare Theater Company
As the weather warms, the SHL! team turns to Shakespeare’s green world. As the torrent of images of nature seems to suggest, in comedies and tragedies alike, the world of nature, of Stratford-upon-Avon and the English countryside, was never far from his heart or his pen. What do Shakespeare’s works, written during the first wave of early modern mass urbanization, tell us about views of our natural world, then and now? How do his works (and the production of those works) relate to 21st century sustainability movements? In this episode, we discuss Shakespeare the environmentalist. Guests: Sir Jonathan Bate (Foundation Professor of Environmental Humanities at Arizona State University, Professor of English Literature at University of Oxford, renowned Shakespeare scholar); Susan Hilferty (Salomé, The Oresteia; Tony and Obie Award-winning costume and scenic designer; Chair, Department of Design for Stage and Film at NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts); and Davis McCallum (Artistic Director, Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival).
Reading & Writing
|
March 10, 2021
2021-03-10
|
Live
|
10
Shakespeare Hour Live: The Crucible
-
Shakespeare Theater Company
Though their styles may be different, Arthur Miller and William Shakespeare were dramatic giants of their time, working nearly four centuries apart. In this episode, we examine Miller’s craft, his dramatic poetry, his groundbreaking use of the stage to serve as a tribunal for the most important issues of the 20th century, and his own influence, Shakespearean in its own right, in the dramatic canon. Is it time to discover Arthur Miller all over again? In anticipation of STC’s upcoming production of The Crucible, join us to delve into the works of this quintessentially American, classic playwright. Guests: Prof. Sue Abbotson (Professor of Modern and Contemporary Drama, Rhode Island College; Performance Editor, Arthur Miller Journal); Jason Butler Harner (Broadway's The Crucible, The Coast of Utopia; Netflix's Ozark); and Whitney White (STC Associate Director; Director, The Amen Corner, The Crucible [upcoming]; Obie Award-winning director).
Art & Music
|
March 17, 2021
2021-03-17
|
Live
|
$10
Shakespeare’s Sonnets
-
92nd Street Y
Join two of the world’s foremost Shakespeare scholars for a lecture and conversation about the some of the Bard’s most beloved, mysterious, and satisfying works—his sonnets. Shakespeare wrote sonnets for both personal and professional reasons, and taken into consideration together—as Edmondson and Wells do in their new volume, All the Sonnets of Shakespeare—the poems encompass a sustained and fascinating mediation on love, ambition, time, sexuality, mortality, Shakespeare’s own career as a playwright, and more. In this lecture and discussion, participants learn how the sonnets were composed; what they reveal about their author; and how they fit into, and inform, Shakespeare’s larger body of work. Participants are encouraged to read sonnets 20 and 138 prior to the class. This program will be recorded and available for later viewing by all who register.
Reading & Writing
|
March 9, 2021
2021-03-09
|
Live
|
20
Social Capital: Has the Myth of Meritocracy Killed the American Dream?
-
Aspen Institute
Has the ethos of the American Dream become hollow? Is the rhetoric true that if you work hard and play by the rules, you should be able to rise as far as your talents take you? Michael Sandel, professor of political philosophy at Harvard and author of the forthcoming book The Tyranny of Merit: What’s Become of the Common Good, doesn’t think so. “One of the deepest failures of governing elites of the center right and center left [over the last 40 years], is that inequalities have deepened almost all of the income growth,” he says. “Not only is the inequality deeper, but upward mobility is stalled.” The current pandemic — laying bare deep disparities in educational opportunity, wages for essential workers, access to healthcare, and racial injustice — further exposes the failure of meritocracy.
Culture & Politics
|
March 19, 2021
2021-03-19
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Spotlight Lecture: Einstein's Cosmic Legacy
-
University of Chicago Graham School
This Faculty Spotlight Lecture will feature Master of Liberal Arts (MLA) faculty member and UChicago Professor of Astronomy and Astrophysics Rocky Kolb leading a discussion about the life, work, and legacy of the Nobel Prize winner who revolutionized our understanding of the cosmos and whose name has become synonymous with Genius. Professor Kolb’s talk will cover Einstein’s biography, provide an accessible overview of the Theory of Relativity, and explore the ways in which much of today’s new scientific discoveries remain in Albert Einstein’s debt.
Science & Nature
|
March 11, 2021
2021-03-11
|
Live
|
FREE
St. Patrick's Day Feast
-
18 Reasons
Let’s celebrate the deep historic connection between Ireland and the United States with a hearty bowl of Irish Stew, rich with chunks of fall-apart tender lamb and luscious vegetables. Something to put it on, and more to celebrate: Colcannon, the fabulous mash of potatoes and greens, enriched with too much butter in honor of the Saint and maybe even sparked with a smidge of crispy bacon. A loaf of the most amazing daily bread found anywhere on our human planet: Irish Soda Bread, leavened with chemistry and magic. And not a single half-drop of stupid food coloring anywhere near our Guinness Stout. This class menu includes: Irish Stew; Colcannon; Irish Soda Bread; and Guinness Stout. Fortunately the stout is ready to drink!
Food & Drink
|
March 17, 2021
2021-03-17
|
Live
|
50
Stephane Wrembel Band Plays Stephane Wrembel
-
French Institute: Alliance Francaise
Award-winning French guitarist Stephane Wrembel and his world-class band—Thor Jensen on guitar, Ari Folman-Cohen on bass, and Nick Anderson on drums—live stream a night of original compositions from the FIAF stage. This special show is a rare opportunity to see Wrembel performing all original compositions, including his Grammy Award®–winning composition “Bistro Fada” from the Academy Award®–winning movie “Midnight In Paris.” Wrembel’s recordings and live performances have received raves in The New York Times, Jazz Times, Acoustic Guitar, Vintage Guitar Magazine, Downbeat, Jazziz and more. Aquarian Weekly wrote, “Stephane Wrembel just might be the greatest acoustic guitarist alive.” David Fricke of Rolling Stone called him “a revelation.”
Art & Music
|
March 18, 2021
2021-03-18
|
Live
|
20
Stories from the Stage: Silver Lining
-
WGBH Boston
The last year has been really tough, for everyone and it’s times like these that we should all remember that every cloud has a silver lining. In this Stories from the Stage event, enjoy some of the most inspirational stories that focus on hope especially when the world feels nothing but bleak. Gather with our storytellers as they will share their own silver linings with you.
Reading & Writing
|
March 18, 2021
2021-03-18
|
Live
|
FREE
Storytelling: Find Your Voice
-
Berkeley Repertory Theater
In this six-week virtual course, we will dive into the art of storytelling and personal narratives. Whether you have a solo show dying to be birthed or you want to hone your storytelling skills for professional reasons, this class will help you: harness your creativity, trust your instincts, quiet your inner critic, find your unique voice through acting, improv and writing exercises.
Art & Music
|
May 20, 2021
2021-05-20
|
Live
|
$240
Summer of Know: Reckoning!
-
Guggenheim Museums
Summer of Know is a conversation series dedicated to engaging with current issues as they are filtered through the generative lens of art. Co-curated in 2020 by For Freedoms and designed to spark cross-disciplinary dialogue and debate, these discussions feature contemporary artists, practitioners, and thought leaders who are at the forefront of the ideas, organizing, and actions most urgently impacting society and culture today. The second program of this 2020 series addresses Indigenous Peoples’ rights, cultural protection, and restorative justice in a discussion moderated by Native Rights Specialist Jodi Archambault (Hunkpapa and Oglala Lakota). Panelists include writer and curator Suzan Shown Harjo (Cheyenne and Hodulgee Muscogee); artist and educator Hock E Aye Vi Edgar Heap of Birds (Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes); social entrepreneur and organizer Natalie Stites Means (Dakota/Lakota) and artist, curator, and publisher America Meredith (Cherokee Nation).
Art & Music
|
March 25, 2021
2021-03-25
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Sweet and Savory Spring Pies
-
18 Reasons
What’s better, or more beautiful, than a pie? Make a simple crust, add either eggs and cheese or fruit, and you’ve got a stunning meal or a celebratory dessert. The beauty of the pie lies in its simplicity: Master the basic form, and it becomes a canvas for endless experimentation. This spring, we’ll be playing with two forms of pie: a classic quiche and a simple (but stunning) strawberry rhubarb pie, both using the same dough for their crusts. The result is full meal fit for an intimate Easter brunch or an afternoon tea with friends (outdoors, of course). This class menu includes: Strawberry Rhubarb Pie with Frosted Flowers; Mushroom and Onion Quiche with Gruyere; and Green Salad with Herbs and French Vinaigrette.
Food & Drink
|
March 28, 2021
2021-03-28
|
Live
|
50
T Book Club: A Discussion on “Passing”
-
The New York Times
The third title selected for T Magazine's book club, Nella Larsen's "Passing" (1929) tells the story of two old friends, both Black women, who reunite in 1920s Harlem, despite the fact that one of them is living as a white person. Critically acclaimed at the time of its publication, the novel captures the social anxieties that plagued America during the Great Migration and remains a resonant portrait of a fractured nation. On March 9, watch a virtual discussion of the book, featuring the novelist Brit Bennett in conversation with T features director Thessaly La Force, that will address questions from readers.
Reading & Writing
|
March 9, 2021
2021-03-09
|
Live
|
FREE
THIS LAND: A Reading Featuring Poet Laureate Joy Harjo
-
Georgetown University
“THIS LAND,” will for many of us immediately evoke the lyrics of Woodie Guthrie’s best-known song, “This Land is Your Land.” Guthrie was an unabashedly political folk singer, one whose art imagined inclusive and non-proprietary ways of being attached to the land. The Lannan Symposium will be an opportunity to think together about a renewed politics of the land and about the role of literary art in building this politics. How can we ensure that this land endures to support future life and flourishing? How can this land be remade for dispossessed indigenous peoples as well as the dispossessors, for new immigrants as well as old, for nonhuman as well as human life, for you and me?” Join us for this kick-off event with US Poet Laureate Joy Harjo, and NPR's Maureen Corrigan. About Joy Harjo: In 2019, Joy Harjo was appointed the 23rd United States Poet Laureate, the first Native American to hold the position. Born in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Harjo is an internationally known award-winning poet, writer, performer, and saxophone player of the Mvskoke/Creek Nation. Harjo’s nine books of poetry include An American Sunrise, Conflict Resolution for Holy Beings, How We Became Human: New and Selected Poems, and She Had Some Horses. Harjo’s memoir Crazy Brave won several awards, including the PEN USA Literary Award for Creative Non-Fiction and the American Book Award. She is the recipient of the Ruth Lilly Prize from the Poetry Foundation for Lifetime Achievement, the 2015 Wallace Stevens Award from the Academy of American Poets for proven mastery in the art of poetry, a Guggenheim Fellowship, the William Carlos Williams Award from the Poetry Society of America, and the United States Artist Fellowship. About Maureen Corrigan: Maureen Corrigan is The Nicky and Jamie Grant Distinguished Professor of the Practice in Literary Criticism in the Department of English at Georgetown University. For the past 31 years, Corrigan has been the weekly book critic on the Peabody Award-winning NPR program, ”Fresh Air.” She is also a Mystery Columnist for The Washington Post and publishes regularly on NPR on-line and The Wall Street Journal. In 2018, she received the National Book Critics Circle’s Citation for Excellence in Reviewing.
Reading & Writing
|
March 16, 2021
2021-03-16
|
Live
|
FREE
TNR Live: How the Government Can Fight Global Warming
-
The New Republic
Building the tool kit to slow climate change. Gather with others and The New Republic for this edition of TNR Live: How Government Can Fight Global Warming, in partnership with Scripps Presents. With Kate Aronoff—TNR staff writer; Ben Ehrenreich—journalist and novelist; Mariana Mazzucato—professor of economics, University College London; and Moderator Heather Souvaine Horn—TNR staff, Apocalypse Soon editor.
Culture & Politics
|
March 23, 2021
2021-03-23
|
Live
|
FREE
TNR Live: Politics and the Media
-
The New Republic
Gather with leading writers and thinkers for a panel discussion on politics and the media, taking a look at lessons learned from the Trump debacle. Featuring Maria Bustillos—journalist, Popula; Jay Rosen—writer, professor of journalism, New York University; Gabe Schneider—journalist; Matthew Sheffield—journalist; and Moderator: Alex Shephard, TNR staff writer.
Culture & Politics
|
March 9, 2021
2021-03-09
|
Live
|
FREE
TNR Salon Series With Louis Menand
-
The New Republic
Join The New Republic for a livestream of our Salon book series featuring Louis Menand, author, and Laura Marsh, TNR literary editor, as they talk about The Free World: Art and Thought in the Cold War. The Cold War was not just a contest of power. It was also about ideas, in the broadest sense—economic and political, artistic and personal. In The Free World, the acclaimed Pulitzer Prize–winning scholar and critic Louis Menand tells the story of American culture in the pivotal years from the end of World War II to Vietnam and shows how changing economic, technological, and social forces put their mark on creations of the mind. How did elitism and an anti-totalitarian skepticism of passion and ideology give way to a new sensibility defined by freewheeling experimentation and loving the Beatles? How was the ideal of “freedom” applied to causes that ranged from anti-communism and civil rights to radical acts of self-creation via art and even crime? With the wit and insight familiar to readers of The Metaphysical Club and his New Yorker essays, Menand takes us inside Hannah Arendt’s Manhattan, the Paris of Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir, Merce Cunningham and John Cage’s residencies at North Carolina’s Black Mountain College, and the Memphis studio where Sam Phillips and Elvis Presley created a new music for the American teenager. He examines the post war vogue for French existentialism, structuralism and post-structuralism, the rise of abstract expressionism and pop art, Allen Ginsberg’s friendship with Lionel Trilling, James Baldwin’s transformation into a Civil Right spokesman, Susan Sontag’s challenges to the New York Intellectuals, the defeat of obscenity laws, and the rise of the New Hollywood. Stressing the rich flow of ideas across the Atlantic, he also shows how Europeans played a vital role in promoting and influencing American art and entertainment. By the end of the Vietnam era, the American government had lost the moral prestige it enjoyed at the end of the Second World War, but America’s once-despised culture had become respected and adored. With unprecedented verve and range, this book explains how that happened.
Culture & Politics
|
April 27, 2021
2021-04-27
|
Live
|
FREE
Thaddeus Stevens: Civil War Revolutionary, Fighter for Racial Justice
-
National Archives of the United States
Thaddeus Stevens was among the first to see the Civil War as an opportunity for a second American Revolution—a chance to remake the country as a true multiracial democracy. As historian Bruce Levine has written, Stevens was one of the foremost abolitionists in Congress in the years leading up to the Civil War, fighting for antislavery and antiracist policies long before party colleagues like Abraham Lincoln endorsed them. During the Reconstruction era, Stevens demanded equal civil and political rights for Black Americans, rights eventually embodied in the 14th and 15th Amendments. Joining Bruce Levine in conversation will be historian and author Manish Sinha.
Culture & Politics
|
March 11, 2021
2021-03-11
|
Live
|
FREE
The Agitators: Three Friends Who Fought for Abolition and Women’s Rights
-
National Archives of the United States
From the perspective of three friends and neighbors in mid-19th-century Auburn, NY—the “agitators” of the title—Dorothy Wickenden tells the fascinating stories of abolition, the Underground Railroad, the early women’s rights movement, and the Civil War. Harriet Tubman, one of the most important conductors on the Underground Railroad, hid the enslaved men, women, and children she rescued in the basement kitchens of her friends, Martha Wright and Frances Seward. Martha Wright was a Quaker mother of seven and organizer of women’s rights and abolitionist conventions with Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Frances Seward—the wife of Governor, then Senator, then Secretary of State William H. Seward—gave freedom-seekers money and referrals and aided in their education, while arguing strenuously with her husband about the urgency of immediate abolition.
Culture & Politics
|
March 30, 2021
2021-03-30
|
Live
|
FREE
The Arensbergs in Hollywood Discussion Series
-
Getty
Part 2: Hollywood Arensberg: Arriving at the House. This event is one of a two-part series presented by Getty Research Institute in partnership with Philadelphia Museum of Art. In their Hollywood home, Louise and Walter Arensberg displayed one of the most important private collections of avant-garde and pre-Columbian art in the United States, as well as the largest library of works by and about the philosopher Sir Francis Bacon. Room by room, the photographs in Hollywood Arensberg: Avant-Garde Collecting in Midcentury L.A. reconstruct the convergence of cultural artifacts in the couple’s California modernist home, the center of a burgeoning art scene. In the second of two conversations, our panelists explore how the context of the collection shapes how it is assembled, displayed, and interpreted. The conversation is moderated by Getty Research Institute Director Mary Miller.
Art & Music
|
March 9, 2021
2021-03-09
|
Live
|
FREE
The Art of Looking
-
National Gallery of Art
By sharing observations, interpretations, questions, and ideas, participants build on their own first impressions and broaden their understanding of Berthe Morisot's The Mother and Sister of the Artist in honor of Women's History Month. This session lasts one hour and is completely interactive. Gallery educators will facilitate the conversation to create an environment for shared learning. These conversations will encourage you to engage deeply with art, with others, and with the world around you as you hone skills in visual literacy and perspective-taking. This program is free and open to the public and is designed for anyone interested in talking about art. No art or art history background is required. Ages 18 and over. Due to the interactive nature of this program, sessions are not recorded. Free with advance registration required.
Art & Music
|
March 12, 2021
2021-03-12
|
Live
|
FREE
The Art of Science: Session 1 – Visual Art
-
Smithsonian Institution
Explore the connection between science and art in the first program of the new virtual series, “Art of Science: Conversations with Creatives in Science,” from the Smithsonian Marine Station in Ft. Pierce, Florida. This session focuses on Visual Artists and features three panelists from diverse scientific and artistic backgrounds. Panelists will share how their understanding of science has shaped their own artistic journey, give the audience “tips and tricks” for aspiring scientific creatives, and answer questions from the audience. This is a free program! Panelists for this session include: Sean Vidal Edgerton, a scientific illustrator with a background in Ecology, Evolution and Conservation Biology; Terri Nelson, an award-winning scientific illustrator and cartoonist; and Skye Morét, a marine scientist who creates visual art from scientific data.
Science & Nature
|
March 18, 2021
2021-03-18
|
Live
|
FREE
The Artistry and Scholarship of Shakespeare: Reimagining Hamlet and the Wonders of the First Folios
-
Aspen Institute
Featuring Folger Shakespeare Library Director Dr. Michael Witmore, Insight Partners Co-Founder Jerry Murdock, and Utah Shakespeare Festival Artistic Director Brian Vaughn, in conversation with Movers and Shakespeares Vice President and longtime Aspen Institute Moderator Ken Adelman. The panel will discuss the Folger Shakespeare Library collection and scholarship work, as well as Murdock’s interpretation and production of Hamlet, which was directed by Vaughn. How do the politics of Shakespeare’s time inform this interpretation of Hamlet? Why did Ophelia’s role need to be reexamined?
Reading & Writing
|
March 29, 2021
2021-03-29
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
The Atelier with Alina Cho: Gabriela Hearst
-
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Join journalist Alina Cho and fashion designer Gabriela Hearst for a conversation about Hearst's dual roles as Creative Director for both the luxury fashion house Chloé and her eponymous line. Learn about Hearst's commitment to sustainability and philanthropy as well as her history of dressing strong, notable women, including First Lady Jill Biden.
Art & Music
|
March 10, 2021
2021-03-10
|
Live
|
FREE
The Beatles' White Album: How It Was Made
-
Johns Hopkins University Odyssey Program
In the spring of 1968, The Beatles, the most popular group in history, returned from Rishikesh, India, after studying meditation with the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. They brought with them dozens of new songs. Unknown to their fans, The Beatles were falling apart as a group. John Lennon was reinventing himself with Yoko Ono; George Harrison was no longer satisfied with third place to Lennon and McCartney; Paul McCartney was the nice guy with the big ego; and even Ringo Starr was tired of the other Beatles demeaning his drumming. Over the summer of 1968 and into the fall, The Beatles created the most ambitious album in history, second only to Brian Wilson's Smile album. 30 songs, over 90 minutes long, and the greatest variety of musical styles on any album to this day. In many ways, it is three solo albums with one song by Ringo. Many of the tracks were laid down by the individual Beatles alone in the studio. It would be the best selling Beatles album in history. And the most controversial. The album was called simply The Beatles, but because of its plain white cover front, back, and inside, the album was quickly nicknamed The White Album. Even group members, Paul, Ringo, Sir George Martin, and even Yoko Ono, refer to it as The White Album in interviews. So do we. Join us for a study of this great masterpiece by the group that was truly the soul of the Zeitgeist.
Art & Music
|
April 14, 2021
2021-04-14
|
Live
|
105
The Big Story: How the Virus Won
-
The Atlantic
Atlantic staff writer Ed Yong has spoken with more than 100 experts since the early stages of the pandemic. “I’ve learned that almost everything that went wrong with America’s response to the pandemic was predictable and preventable,” Yong writes. “The COVID‐19 debacle has also touched—and implicated—nearly every other facet of American society: its shortsighted leadership, its disregard for expertise, its racial inequities, its social-media culture, and its fealty to a dangerous strain of individualism.” In August, Yong sat down with The Atlantic’s editor in chief, Jeffrey Goldberg, for a conversation about how the U.S. botched its response to the pandemic, and how we can prevent future health crises. This is an important conversation with a writer who has contributed greatly to our collective understanding of COVID-19 and its repercussions.
Culture & Politics
|
March 17, 2021
2021-03-17
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
The Classical and the Contemporary: Conversation with Jim Dine
-
The Morgan Library & Museum
The exhibition Conversations in Drawing: Seven Centuries of Art from the Gray Collection brings together works from across Europe and the United states, illuminating affinities and tensions in the history of drawing. In conjunction with the exhibition join us for a virtual conversation with Jim Dine, whose own work is featured in the show, discussing his drawing practice in relation to the history of Western art as represented in the exhibition by artists such as Veronese, Rubens, Ingres, Picasso, and Matisse. Please note that the program will take place online. After registering, participants will receive a confirmation email with instructions on how to participate using Zoom.
Art & Music
|
March 10, 2021
2021-03-10
|
Live
|
FREE
The Emotional and Physical Benefits of Gratitude and Compassion
-
UCLA Extension
Did you know that practicing gratitude and compassion can increase life satisfaction? An abundance of research shows these practices can improve emotional, physical, and social well-being. People that practice gratitude and compassion have increased happiness, hope, and optimism. They experience greater social connection and are more altruistic. These practices are also associated with reduced stress, depression, chronic pain, and cardiovascular disease. This course will dive into the science and practice of gratitude and compassion. The emotional, physical, and social benefits will be explored, and evidence-based practices will be discussed and practiced.
Health & Wellness
|
April 1, 2021
2021-04-01
|
Live
|
FREE
The Five Great Works of Fiction You Need to Read…Now!
-
92nd Street Y
Join author Stephanie Rabinowitz for an exciting exploration of relatively unsung American literary gems that you should be reading. From Willa Cather’s Death Comes for the Archbishop to John Williams’s Stoner, Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye, Henry James’s What Maisie Knew, and Wallace Stegner’s Angle of Repose, Rabinowitz will focus on the rare and masterful ability of these authors to create narrators with wholly original points of view. The revolutionary techniques of these writers allowed them to achieve the impossible: offering the reader that nearly out-of-body experience of empathizing with fictional characters.
Reading & Writing
|
March 25, 2021
2021-03-25
|
Live
|
20
The Gendered Brain
-
Sydney Opera House
For centuries, science has been trying to prove that men's and women's brains are different. In her myth-smashing book, The Gendered Brain, Professor Gina Rippon dismantles this idea. Unpacking the dubious historical science, like 18th century experiments that saw empty skulls measured with bird seed, Rippon shows how early research fueled the persistent myth that female biology is inferior. She presents cutting edge neuroscience to detail how our brains are highly plastic, individualised, adaptable and full of potential. What if our behaviour is linked not to gender, but to life itself, to all we do and experience? Hosted by award-winning science journalist Natasha Mitchell. Recorded live from the Sydney Opera House in 2020.
Science & Nature
|
March 16, 2021
2021-03-16
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
The Girl Explorers: The Untold Story of the Globetrotting Women Who Trekked, Flew, and Fought Their Way Around the World
-
National Archives of the United States
In The Girl Explorers, author Jayne Zanglein tells the inspirational and untold story of the founding of the Society of Women Geographers―an organization of adventurous female world explorers―and how key members served as early advocates for human rights and paved the way for today’s women scientists.. These women dared to go where no woman―or man―had gone before, achieving the unthinkable and breaking through barriers to allow future generations to carry on their important and inspiring work.
Reading & Writing
|
March 9, 2021
2021-03-09
|
Live
|
FREE
The Great Thinkers: Alexander Nemerov: Helen Frankenthaler and 1950s New York
-
92nd Street Y
Join award-winning art scholar, Stanford professor and author Alexander Nemerov for a fascinating look at the life and work of one of the 20th century’s most acclaimed painters. Nemerov shares stories from his new book, Fierce Poise: Helen Frankenthaler and 1950s New York, illuminating the rich intellectual and creative life of the postwar New York City that launched Helen Frankenthaler’s singular career and fueled its flourishing. From Frankenthaler’s privileged Upper East Side upbringing as the daughter of a respected state Supreme Court Justice to her life-altering first encounter with the work of Jackson Pollock to charting her own course in a male-dominated art world, Nemerov explores how Frankenthaler came of age as an artist. And he celebrates the art itself, bringing fresh insights into the luminous, color-stained, commanding works that made Frankenthaler a pioneer of 20th century painting. This program will take place live online with an opportunity to interact with the instructor. Session will be recorded and made available for patrons for later viewing as well.
Art & Music
|
March 18, 2021
2021-03-18
|
Live
|
20
The Happy Traitor: Spies, Lies and Exile in Russia: The Extraordinary Story of George Blake
-
The University of Oxford
Unravelling the life, character and motivations of the last known Cold War double agent, George Blake, The Happy Traitor paints a chilling portrait of a thoughtful and idealistic man, responsible for passing on key intelligence, including the identities of hundreds of British agents, to the Soviets. George Blake was the last remaining Cold War spy. As a Senior Officer in the British Intelligence Service who was double agent for the Soviet Union, his actions had devastating consequences for Britain. Through a combination of personal interviews, research and unique access to Stasi records, journalist Simon Kuper unravels who Blake truly was, what he was capable of, and why he did it. Simon Kuper is a weekly columnist for the Financial Times, and author of books including The Football Men, Soccernomics, and Football Against the Enemy. He will be in conversation with: Dr Helen Fry, historian and author of MI9: A History of The Secret Service for Escape & Evasion; and The Walls Have Ears; ambassador for The Museum of Military Intelligence, and President of the Friends of the National Archives; Ricardo Soares de Oliveira (St Peter’s College, Oxford), Professor of African Politics; and Rana Mitter (St Cross College, Oxford), Professor of the History and Politics of Modern China.
Reading & Writing
|
March 12, 2021
2021-03-12
|
Live
|
FREE
The History of Cinema Told Through Great Films: 1980-2000
-
Stanford Continuing Studies
In the late 1970s, American cinema, powered by a new generation of directors educated at film schools, radically altered Hollywood. Films became far grittier, morally ambiguous, and frankly sexual than anything that had come before from mainstream cinema. However, as Ronald Reagan’s “Morning in America” ushered in the mid 1980s, movie studios changed course, realizing they could rake in money with blockbusters that looked like lavish music videos. These films were a far cry from the low-key, character-based films of the ’70s, and drove independent filmmakers around the world to pursue their own unique visions outside the Hollywood system. David Lynch (Blue Velvet) created horrifying, surreal reflections of the times. Spike Lee (Do the Right Thing) produced an uncompromising look at racial strife in America that resonates more now than when it came out. In East Asia, Wong Kar-wai (In The Mood for Love) in Hong Kong and Taiwanese filmmaker Edward Yang (A Brighter Summer Day) wrestled with their respective countries' complex histories while reinventing film form. In Iran, Abbas Kiarostami (Close-Up) blurred the lines between documentary and fiction cinema. Students will come away with a strong understanding of the seismic shift in filmmaking brought upon by these great films, along with a clear sense of the filmmaker behind each one. All films can be rented or streamed instantly through Netflix, Amazon Prime, iTunes, Google Play Movies, or other online platforms.
Film & Photography
|
March 30, 2021
2021-03-30
|
Live
|
370
The Hitchcock Blondes: Icons and Obsessions
-
NYU School of Professional Studies
Women generally play either victim or villainess in thrillers, but Alfred Hitchcock’s movies construct a different, self-contradictory archetype—a “snow-covered volcano” whose icy exterior can disguise burning passions, a vulnerable figure who may be deadlier than the male—in movies that simultaneously subject their heroines to painful indignities yet identify thoroughly with their struggles. With the author of a forthcoming book about Hitchcock, discover and discuss this classic movie character and its creator’s complicated obsession with feminine power. Films may include The 39 Steps, Notorious, Rear Window, Vertigo, Psycho, and Marnie. You will watch the films on your own and then meet online for lively and informative discussions.
Film & Photography
|
March 30, 2021
2021-03-30
|
Live
|
349
The Ides of March: The Context and Consequences of Caesar's Death
-
Getty
March 15, the Ides of March, is forever associated with the assassination of Julius Caesar by senators hoping to preserve the Roman Republic. The aftermath was not what they had hoped. On the anniversary of the Ides in 2021, explore with Roman historians Edward Watts and Stefan Chrissanthos the political rise, gruesome death, and lasting legacy of the famous dictator. Learn about Caesar, the polarizing politics of Rome, and the lessons the past still offers for republics today. Stefan G. Stefan G. Chrissanthos teaches Greek and Roman social, political, and military history in the department of history at UC Riverside. He received his B.A. in History from UC Santa Barbara and his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Southern California. His book Warfare in the Ancient World offers a comprehensive history of warfare, while The Year of Julius and Caesar: 59 B.C. and the Transformation of the Roman Republic (2019) centers on the historical impact of one important year in the life of Caesar and the Roman Republic. Edward Watts holds the Alkiviadis Vassiliadis Endowed Chair in Byzantine History at UC San Diego. His eclectic teaching and research span Roman and Byzantine history, Late Antiquity, and the Medieval Mediterranean. Watts attended Brown University, where he focused on classics and religious studies, and received his M.A. and Ph.D. in History from Yale University. His most recent book, Mortal Republic: How Rome Fell into Tyranny (2018), offers new insights into the death of Caesar and rise of Empire.
Art & Music
|
March 15, 2021
2021-03-15
|
Live
|
FREE
The Inheritance Project: A Live Virtual Event
-
The Atlantic
“Inheritance” is The Atlantic’s new project about American history, Black life, and the resilience of memory. In a live virtual event, The Atlantic will gather leading writers to discuss how Black history has been buried—and what unearthing it will look like. The event will feature the Atlantic editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg, staff writer Adam Harris, senior editor Vann R. Newkirk II, contributing writer Anna Deavere Smith, and managing editor Gillian White, as well as the author and Harvard professor Danielle Allen and the poet Joy Priest.
Culture & Politics
|
March 9, 2021
2021-03-09
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
The Intentional Museum
-
Harvard Art Museums
American historian Christy Coleman is the distinguished lecturer for the 2021 Seminar on Innovative Curatorial Practice. She is renowned for creating innovative, engaging, and inclusive museum exhibitions and programs that tell a comprehensive story of American history. In this program, Coleman will discuss the power that museums have to genuinely engage with communities around what matters to them most. While expertise within museums is invaluable, it is wasted if not used to help communities address their issues and aspirations.
Art & Music
|
March 24, 2021
2021-03-24
|
Live
|
FREE
The Italian Way with Vegetables: Easter
-
18 Reasons
Italians love to celebrate seasonal, truly fleeting produce. They have a knack for making simple seem special, and they know how to transform a small basket of vegetables into a feast. The Easter meal our Italian instructors cherishes most is the traditional breakfast where spring vegetables are presented in a myriad of ways. Viola will share her spin on some of those dishes, making them the showstoppers of any vegetarian Easter table. Expect to hear tales of Easter family traditions and learn new techniques. The menu for this class includes: Torta genovese pasqualina di carciofi—Genoa Easter artichoke and ricotta pie; Teglia di patate novelle con aglietto verde, piselli e maggiorana—New potatoes casserole with green garlic, peas and marjoram.
Food & Drink
|
March 20, 2021
2021-03-20
|
Live
|
50
The Moth Virtual StorySLAM: Nostalgia—Yoshitomo Nara
-
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Join us for an evening of art and storytelling in this StorySLAM co-produced with The Moth, the acclaimed storytelling nonprofit. StorySLAM is a community-focused, open-mic storytelling competition in which anyone can share a five-minute story on the night’s theme. The theme “Nostalgia” is inspired by the exhibition Yoshitomo Nara. Nara is among the most beloved Japanese artists of his generation. Nara’s oeuvre takes inspiration from a wide range of resources—memories of his childhood, music, literature, and more. Different Ways to Attend the Show: Admission: A ticket for your household to watch the show! Admission + Storyteller*: A ticket for your household that includes a storytelling hopeful. Purchase a ticket using the storyteller's information to have their name put in the hat! The host will draw eight names out of the hat to be the night’s storytellers. * If you're registering as a storyteller, please come prepared to be featured on camera, including adequate lighting, appropriate apparel, and minimal background noise. If selected to tell a story, please stand if you're able to do so. Visit The Moth website for storytelling tips and tricks.
Art & Music
|
March 12, 2021
2021-03-12
|
Live
|
10
The Observant Eye Online
-
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Join us online as we tap into our powers of observation and investigate a work of art together through close looking and discussion. This virtual space offers the unique chance to look at artworks that are not currently on view in the galleries or are too small for in-person group visits. All adult learners are welcome. Advance registration is required to access the online meeting room. Registration opens on March 8.
Art & Music
|
March 11, 2021
2021-03-11
|
Live
|
FREE
The Paintings of Vincent van Gogh with Alexander Nemerov
-
Stanford Continuing Studies
Was Vincent van Gogh the greatest painter ever? If so, what does that word “greatest” even mean? This course will challenge students to enter into the world of painting, in order to find its transformative powers and strange and sudden common sense—its capacity to make our lives clearer, if only for a moment. Starting with van Gogh’s paintings of the asylum’s grounds at Saint-Rémy, the course will explore how his art makes the world startlingly present—how he portrayed trees and sky and budding branches in such unflinching, unapologetic terms. We will discuss how painting itself is an “asylum,” though not in any simple sense (as an escape or refuge). Considering the life and art of this great painter from his time at Saint-Rémy, then back through his earlier art, his time as a preacher, and his youth, the course will encourage students to encounter van Gogh’s paintings with an intensity something like the painter’s own.
Art & Music
|
April 1, 2021
2021-04-01
|
Live
|
360
The Path Forward: The Future of Work with Uber's Dara Khosrowshahi
-
The Washington Post
Dara Khosrowshahi is the CEO of Uber. As companies continue to recover from the pandemic, hard-hit businesses are focused on rebuilding better. Khosrowshahi joins Washington Post Live to discuss a new approach to support gig economy workers with benefits and protections while maintaining their flexibility to work when and where they want. Join Washington Post columnist David Ignatius.
Culture & Politics
|
March 19, 2021
2021-03-19
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
The Poetry of Emily Dickinson
-
Stanford Continuing Studies
While only ten poems by Emily Dickinson (1830–86) were published during her lifetime, the posthumous publication of her over 1,800 poems has changed the course of American poetry. From the mystique of her very private domestic life, to her treatment of the sublime in the everyday, her works are among the most widely studied poems in the United States and around the globe. Dickinson’s poetry differs drastically in style, form, and content from her contemporary 19th-century poets such as Whitman and Tennyson. Keenly figurative, her work treats the themes of death, love, nature, and immortality in a highly original style, creating a startling worldview. She arranged much of her poetry into hand-stitched volumes she called fascicles, thus ordering poems not chronologically but rather in terms of their connections. This course will approach Dickinson’s work by reading her most famous poems thematically and studying her fascicles as units of thought that function beyond an individual poem. We will also counterpoise her poetry to that of other poets whom she liked to read: for example, the work on love by her British contemporary, Elizabeth Barrett Browning. Finally, the course will serve as an introduction to poetics, providing students with specific techniques to interpret poems in terms of their sound, image, meaning, and audience.
Reading & Writing
|
April 13, 2021
2021-04-13
|
Live
|
410
The Power of Lift: A Conversation with Melinda Gates
-
Stanford University
In her compelling and candid book, The Moment of Lift: How Empowering Women Changes the World, philanthropist Melinda Gates shares the stories of women she’s met all around the world, and comes to a critical conclusion — “If you want to lift up humanity, empower women.” Join Stanford's Knight-Hennessy Scholars for a conversation with Melinda Gates on the day after International Women’s Day to discuss lessons from her book in leadership and the power of lifting up women.
Culture & Politics
|
March 9, 2021
2021-03-09
|
Live
|
FREE
The Reader Belongs to the Play: Artists’ Books and the Library
-
McGill University
Join us for the final event in our series on Alphabet and Artist Books with special guests Clara Drummond and Maggie Welch. Asked what the purpose of a book is, Bruno Munari, the Italian artist, designer, and bookmaker, answered, “To pass on knowledge or pleasure or, in any case, to increase our knowledge of the world.” His books famously attempt to increase knowledge in playful ways and encouraged readers to interact with the books by engaging multiple senses: to open treasure boxes or windows, peer through holes, and turn translucent pages, for example. This focus on interactivity and engaging the multiple senses of a reader remains a prominent feature of many contemporary artists' books today. Taking a 2019 student-curated exhibit Paper Play as a starting point, we will consider how artists’ books demand play and how librarians can facilitate playful encounters in a physical and/or virtual setting. Clara Drummond is a curator and exhibition coordinator at the Special Collections Library, Penn State University. She has curated exhibitions on the secret lives of girls and women, fairy-tale wolves, and Jane Austen, to name a few. She holds a PhD in Editorial Studies from Boston University, an MLIS from Simmons University, and was previously a curator of manuscripts at the Morgan Library & Museum. Maggie Welch is an artist and recent Penn State grad based in Austin TX. She worked for the Eberly Family Special Collections as the Stelts-Filippelli Curatorial Intern in 2019 and 2020 and curated the exhibition Paper Play, which featured artists' books. Her work explores how complex ideas can be grounded in interactivity and play.
Reading & Writing
|
March 16, 2021
2021-03-16
|
Live
|
FREE
The Real Sutton Hoo: Digging into "The Dig" with Dr. Catherine Hills
-
UC Berkeley
Sutton Hoo is near Woodbridge in Suffolk, near the east coast of England. It is the site of burials dating to the later sixth and early seventh century AD. One burial mound produced a spectacular burial, in a ship with lavish grave goods. The discovery of this burial in 1939 has received renewed public interest this year because it is the subject of the film “The Dig”. How much of the story told in the film is true? What is the significance of the find? This lecture will review the history of investigations, from the sixteenth century to the present day, and put the finds in the wider context of early medieval England and beyond. Several recent discoveries have added to our picture of this period: the Staffordshire Hoard, the Prittlewell burial and the site at Rendlesham, a few miles away, recorded by Bede as the home of Raedwald, king of East Anglia, who may have been buried at Sutton Hoo. Brief accounts of these will be included, showing how they relate to Sutton Hoo in this very active field of research into early medieval England. About the speaker: Dr. Catherine Hills is a Fellow emerita of Newnham College and a Senior Fellow of the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, both at Cambridge University.
Culture & Politics
|
March 9, 2021
2021-03-09
|
Live
|
FREE
The Rise of Digital Authoritarianism: China, AI and Human Rights
-
Stanford Hoover Institution
China’s authoritarianism has fully expanded into the digital space. Through hundreds of millions of surveillance cameras, unprecedented amounts of data collection, state-sponsored technological investment, and global research partnerships, the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) is aiming to become the world’s leading AI superpower by 2030. In doing so, the Chinese government and corporate actors are weaponizing AI domestically, exporting surveillance tools to countries around the world, and demanding ideological compliance in the global market. In this series of events, speakers will explore: the extent to which artificial intelligence (AI) is used inside China today; how the Chinese government and big tech are shaping the global market; how surveillance technology is exported around the world; and what can be done to meet this rising challenge; and ultimately, what are the ethical responsibilities inherent in developing these technologies? For the final sessions on October 9, hear from Audrey Tang, Digital Minister, Taiwan, followed by a Panel Discussion: How Democracies Should Respond to China’s Emergence as an AI Superpower, moderated by Larry Diamond.
Culture & Politics
|
March 18, 2021
2021-03-18
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
The Sound She Saw: Ming Smith in Conversation with Greg Tate
-
Whitney Museum of American Art
Honoring the publication of Ming Smith: An Aperture Monograph (Aperture, 2020), this conversation brings Ming Smith, the first female member of the Kamoinge Workshop, into dialogue with critic and musician Greg Tate, one of the book’s contributors. Presenting four decades of Smith’s work, the publication celebrates her enduring vision and ongoing contributions to the medium of photography. The conversation is introduced by Rujeko Hockley, Whitney assistant curator. Presented in collaboration with Aperture, this series of programs features conversations with artists from the Kamoinge Workshop included in the exhibition Working Together: Photographers of the Kamoinge Workshop currently on view at the Whitney. The talks explore the group’s genesis in Harlem in the 1960s, its role in the Black Arts movement, and the multidisciplinary interests and practices of its members, bringing together artists from the Kamoinge Workshop with scholars and critics of Black arts and culture. Aperture, a not-for-profit foundation dedicated to photography, connects the photo community and its audiences with the most inspiring work, the sharpest ideas, and with each other—in print, in person, and online. Free with advance registration.
Film & Photography
|
March 24, 2021
2021-03-24
|
Live
|
FREE
The State of the American Presidency
-
University of Virginia
New York Times columnist Jamelle Bouie, Brown University's James Morone, and the Miller Center's Sid Milkis engage in a wide-ranging discussion on the state of the presidency and its relationship to American democracy during these extraordinary times. The panel will examine Donald Trump’s tempestuous reign, the start of the Biden administration, and the cultural and institutional developments that have brought us here.
Culture & Politics
|
March 12, 2021
2021-03-12
|
Live
|
FREE
The State of the Nation: “American Inequality in a time of the Pandemic”
-
Princeton University
The Office of Population Research is hosting a five part webinar series on The State of the Nation. The first session, called “American Inequality in the Time of a Pandemic,” will lay the ground by engaging participants in reflection over the relationship between the COVID-19 global pandemic and growing inequities in health, employment, housing, political engagement, and social participation. Focus will be on five sectors: African Americans, Hispanic Americans, Asian Americans, and Native Americans. How does population level research help us to understand the distinct experiences of those groups? Speakers include Matthew Desmond, Maurice P. During Professor of Sociology; Marta Tienda, Maurice P. During ’22 Professor in Demographic Studies; and Keith A. Wailoo, Henry Putnam University Professor of History.
Culture & Politics
|
March 11, 2021
2021-03-11
|
Live
|
FREE
The Syrian Requiem: The Civil War and its Aftermath
-
Stanford Hoover Institution
Please gather with the Hoover Institution’s Working Group on the Middle East and the Islamic World for a discussion with Ambassador Itamar Rabinovich, Professor Emeritus at Tel Aviv University and Dr Carmit Valensi, Research Fellow at the Institute for National Security Studies (INSS). The crisis in Syria has festered for ten years now. The addition of Russian and Iranian support in 2016 has kept the Asad regime in power but has never been enough to win the country. As the impasse lingers, instability locally and internationally is exacerbated, and another humanitarian catastrophe may be around the corner. Both the Obama and Trump administrations, reluctant to be drawn into yet another military conflict in the Middle East, were hard put to formulate an effective policy in Syria. The Biden administration must now confront the challenge of coming up with an effective strategy. Followed by conversation with Russell Berman, Senior Fellow, Co-Chair of Working Group on the Middle East and Islamic World and H.R. McMaster, the Fouad and Michelle Ajami Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution.
Culture & Politics
|
March 16, 2021
2021-03-16
|
Live
|
FREE
The Ten Greatest Musicals Ever
-
University of Chicago Graham School
Which musicals changed the face of this most American of art forms? Join the Chicago Tribune's renowned theater critic and cultural columnist Chris Jones on a weekly online journey across the most fascinating Broadway musicals, from 1945 to 2016.
Art & Music
|
March 30, 2021
2021-03-30
|
Live
|
550
The United States, Colombia, and Prospects for Western Hemisphere Security and Prosperity in the Post-Covid Era
-
Stanford Hoover Institution
In this episode of Battlegrounds, H.R. McMaster and former President and Minister of Defense Juan Manuel Santos discuss Colombian security, transnational organized crime and narcotics trafficking, the crisis in Venezuela, and lessons learned from Colombia’s struggle to achieve a lasting peace.
Culture & Politics
|
March 17, 2021
2021-03-17
|
Live
|
FREE
To Make the Wounded Whole: The African-American Struggle Against HIV/AIDS
-
Columbia University
The Lehman Center for American History invites you to join us as we welcome Dr. Dan Royles to our 2020-21 "Race, Health, and Inequality" lecture series, speaking about his book To Make the Wounded Whole: The African-American Struggle Against HIV/AIDS. Dan Royles is Assistant Professor of History at Florida International University.
Culture & Politics
|
March 18, 2021
2021-03-18
|
Live
|
FREE
Touchdown on Mars
-
Royal Ontario Museum
Gather with ROM's Kim Tait in conversation with Tim Haltigin of the Canadian Space Agency as they discuss the Mars Sample Return Mission. Inspired by the recent touchdown of the Perseverance rover on the Red Planet, explore what this extraordinary mission could tell us about the past, present, and future of life in our solar system.
Science & Nature
|
March 11, 2021
2021-03-11
|
Live
|
FREE
Transients: A Poetry Reading and Discussion with Douglas Ridloff
-
Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard
Douglas Ridloff is the founder and executive director of ASL Slam, a nonprofit organization that creates safe spaces for the Deaf community to thrive in the many modalities of their native language. By hosting a monthly event at the Nuyorican Poets Cafe in New York City and then bringing ASL Slam and his unique style of visual vernacular poetry to Australia, Cuba, France, Germany, Israel, Jamaica, Russia, the United Kingdom, and beyond, Ridloff has fostered engagement and enthusiasm for sign languages worldwide. Via workshops, performances, and showcases, Ridloff has presented at numerous museums—including the Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, the Jewish Museum, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the 9/11 Memorial & Museum—and at TEDxUniGeneva and TEDxVienna. He co-organized “An Explosion of Language: Publishing American Sign Language Poetry” at the Center for the Humanities. Ridloff has been featured on Circa, CNN’s Great Big Story, NBC News, and VICE News.
Reading & Writing
|
March 15, 2021
2021-03-15
|
Live
|
FREE
Treasures from the Permanent Collection: An Interactive Spotlight Tour
-
The Morgan Library & Museum
From the Morgan’s three Gutenberg Bibles to the intricately carved cylinder seals of Ancient Mesopotamia, join our Morgan docents as they guide you on an up-close virtual exploration and discussion of one of the many works in the institution’s treasured permanent collection. Please note that the program will take place online. After registering, participants will receive a confirmation email with instructions on how to participate using Zoom. This week's topic: The Architecture of the Morgan.
Art & Music
|
March 19, 2021
2021-03-19
|
Live
|
FREE
Unravelling Extinction: Exploring the Biology of Extinct Animals
-
Royal Ontario Museum
Explore the study of bone as a living tissue with researcher Anusuya Chinsamy-Turan. Even after millions of years of fossilisation, the microscopic structure of fossil bones remains virtually unaltered, and records various aspects of the life history and biology of an animal. Chinsamy-Turan's work provides a unique window into the worlds of extant and extinct vertebrates including dinosaurs and birds, pterosaurs, and nonmammalian synapsids and their descendants. Professor Anusuya Chinsamy-Turan is a palaeobiologist in the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Cape Town. She is a global expert on the microscopic structure of the bones of extinct and extant vertebrates. She completed her PhD at the University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa followed by a Postdoc at the University of Pennsylvania (USA). After returning to South Africa, she worked at the SA Museum as a Specialist Scientist, and later as Director of the Natural History Collections. She has published over 100 scientific articles and 5 books (2 academic and 3 popular level books), and she developed an online course on Extinctions (ranked top 50 and #1 in Science in the world in 2020!). Anusuya has been awarded for her contribution to science as well as to science communication. Her awards include the Royal Society Gold Medal (1997), the 2005 South African Woman of the Year Award, The World Academy of Science’s Popularization of Science and Public Understanding Award (2013), and the Academy of Science of SA’s Science for Society Gold Medal (2015).
Science & Nature
|
March 10, 2021
2021-03-10
|
Live
|
FREE
Urban Farming: Grow Your Own Food
-
Emory Continuing Education
In today’s world, maintaining a self-sufficient lifestyle can have wide-ranging benefits -- we’ll equip you with the knowledge and skills needed to get started growing your own food! Maintaining a food garden is a lost art, but previous generations often took full advantage of this practice to survive and thrive. Whether you live in a one-room studio or on a multi-acre estate, we can create strategies to plan and plant a food garden to fit your lifestyle, region, and specific growing conditions. Worried about your lack of expertise? We’ll walk you through each step of the process -- by the end of the course, your newly-developed green thumb will be the amazement of your neighbors, family, friends—and yourself!
Science & Nature
|
April 24, 2021
2021-04-24
|
Live
|
185
Using Civic Media to Build a Better Society
-
Library of Congress
Kluge Prize winner Danielle Allen moderates an expert panel to explore the role of information in democratic society, addressing the challenges citizens face in consuming the deluge of materials available in the digital age and in identifying trustworthy sources of information. They will consider the potential of civic media to inform and educate within the context of the broader social media ecosystem, where the incentives are to spread information regardless of its truth or value. Panelists will consider what civic media looks like, and how it can it compete with social media. Panelists include: Talia Stroud (University of Texas) a nationally-renowned expert on examining commercially viable and democratically beneficial ways of improving media; Brendesha Tynes (University of Southern California) a leader in the study of how youth experience digital media and how these early experiences are associated with their academic and emotional development. She is also interested in equity issues as they relate to digital literacy; and Richard Young the founder of CivicLex, a non-profit that is using technology, media, and social practice to build a more civically engaged Lexington, Kentucky. CivicLex aims to build stronger relationships between citizens and those who serve them.
Culture & Politics
|
March 11, 2021
2021-03-11
|
Live
|
FREE
Vanessa O'Brien in Conversation With Phil Powers
-
Powell's City of Books
Long before she became the first American woman to summit K2 and the first British woman to return from its summit alive, Vanessa O’Brien was a feisty suburban Detroit teenager forced to reinvent her world in the wake of a devastating loss that destroyed her family. Making her own way in the world, O’Brien strove to reach her lofty ambitions. Soon, armed with an MBA and a wry sense of humor, she climbed the corporate ladder to great success, but after the 2009 economic meltdown, her career went into a tailspin. She searched for a new purpose and settled on an unlikely goal: climbing Mount Everest. When her first attempt ended in disaster, she trudged home, humbled but wiser. Two years later, she made it to the top of the world. And then she kept going. Grounded by a cadre of wise-cracking friends and an inimitable British spouse, O’Brien held her own in the intensely competitive world of mountaineering, summiting the highest peak on every continent, and skiing the last degree to the North and South Poles. She set new speed records for the Seven Summits, receiving a Guinness World Record and the Explorers Grand Slam, and finally made peace with her traumatic past. During her attempt on K2, she very nearly gave up. But on the “savage mountain,” which kills one out of every four climbers who summit, O’Brien evolved from an adventurer out to challenge herself to an explorer with a high-altitude perspective on a changing world — and a new call to share her knowledge and passion across the globe. Told with heart and humor, O’Brien’s To the Greatest Heights (Atria/Emily Bestler) is a transformative story of resilience, higher purpose, and the courage to overcome any obstacle. O’Brien will be joined in conversation by Phil Powers, owner and operator of The Mountain Guides and former CEO of the American Alpine Club.
Reading & Writing
|
April 1, 2021
2021-04-01
|
Live
|
FREE
Vanguard: How Black Women Broke Barriers, Won the Vote, and Insisted on Equality for All
-
National Humanities Center
In the standard story, the suffrage crusade began in Seneca Falls in 1848 and ended with the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920. But this overwhelmingly white women’s movement did not win the vote for most black women. Securing their rights required a movement of their own. In Vanguard, historian Martha S. Jones offers a new history of African American women’s political lives in America. She recounts how they defied both racism and sexism to fight for the ballot, and how they wielded political power to secure the equality and dignity of all persons. From the earliest days of the republic to the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act and beyond, Jones excavates the lives and work of black women — Maria Stewart, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, Fannie Lou Hamer, and more — who were the vanguard of women’s rights, calling on America to realize its best ideals.
Reading & Writing
|
March 12, 2021
2021-03-12
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Vienna in 1824: The Premiere of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony
-
Harvard University
Join us for our Travel Talk with a lecture presented by Thomas Forrest Kelly. Beethoven’s Ninth is among the best-known pieces in the world, and its “Ode to Joy” has been used for all sorts of purposes, good and less good. But there was a time when nobody knew it, nobody had heard it. This talk will consider what it was like to be in Vienna in May of 1824, and attend Mr. Beethoven’s concert to hear his latest symphony.
Art & Music
|
March 11, 2021
2021-03-11
|
Live
|
FREE
Virtual Book Club - Conflict and Resolution: The Life of Roman Republicanism
-
National Humanities Center
For centuries, the importance of civility to the health of republics has been widely recognized. Peaceful resolution of conflicts, open debate, and the nurturing of an engaged citizenry are essential to maintaining governments in which power is held by the people. And yet, civility remains elusive. The scholars in this series help us think about ways of encouraging, preserving, and restoring civility—through political and creative expression, in the courts, on the page, and on the screen—from the classical period to the modern era. This session: A distinguished classics scholar as well as an accomplished academic administrator, Joy Connolly argues in her most recent book, The Life of Roman Republicanism that “Cicero, Sallust, and Horace inspire fresh thinking about central concerns of contemporary political thought and action” including the role conflict plays in the political community, the conditions needed to promote an equal and just society, citizens’ interdependence on one another for senses of selfhood, and the uses and dangers of self-sovereignty and fantasy.
Reading & Writing
|
March 10, 2021
2021-03-10
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Virtual Book Club: The War Before the War: Fugitive Slaves and the Struggle for America’s Soul from the Revolution to the Civil War
-
National Humanities Center
For decades after its founding, the fact that enslaved black people repeatedly risked their lives to flee their masters in the South in search of freedom in the North proved that the “united” states was actually a lie. By awakening northerners to the true nature of slavery, and by enraging southerners who demanded the return of their human “property,” fugitive slaves forced the nation to confront the truth about itself, and led inexorably to civil war. Andrew Delbanco’s masterful examination of the fugitive slave story illuminates what brought us to war with ourselves and the terrible legacies of slavery that are with us still. Andrew Delbanco (Fellow, 2013–14), Alexander Hamilton Professor of American Studies at Columbia University; President, The Teagle Foundation. This talk, live from Fall, 2020, can be enjoyed anytime.
Reading & Writing
|
March 23, 2021
2021-03-23
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Virtual Dance Lab: BeMoved® with Jennifer Edgcomb
-
University of Chicago Arts
Lucky Plush, in collaboration with University of Chicago Arts, brings you a collection of great virtual dance labs. Virtual Dance Lab is a platform for education through movement-based classes. Our sole focus is dance education. All music is used supplementally for teaching purposes only. Gather with others and Jennifer Edcomb for this great dance class, BeMoved®. BeMoved® is a dance experience designed to inspire anyone from first-time dancers to professionals to embrace dance as a lifelong means to health, joy, and fulfillment. See BeMovedDance.com to learn more.
Health & Wellness
|
March 14, 2021
2021-03-14
|
Live
|
5
Virtual Dance Lab: Yoga with A. Raheim White
-
University of Chicago Arts
Lucky Plush launched Virtual Dance Lab with seed support from our general operating funders and residency partners including the University of Chicago this spring. These classes rely on support from participants. This class is fun for everyone! Things will start basic, work foundational postures, and build incrementally with options and modifications for all levels. There will be breath work, functional movement, and meditation. This is strength and flexibility training for body and mind!
Health & Wellness
|
March 12, 2021
2021-03-12
|
Live
|
5
Virtual Maker Night: Art in Bloom
-
Dartmouth College
Flowers are the inspiration for this Maker Night. We’ll explore how artists across Dartmouth's Hood Museum collection use them to create stunning compositions or express ideas. Michael Reed of Robert’s Flowers will join our conversation and teach the basics of flower arranging to inspire some at-home experimentation. No experience necessary. Registration is required. A list of suggested materials will be sent with your confirmation. Grab a friend for maximum fun!
Art & Music
|
April 15, 2021
2021-04-15
|
Live
|
FREE
Virtual Maker Night: Hard-Edged Abstraction
-
Dartmouth College
Taking inspiration from the Hood Museum of Art's collection, we will make together with what’s on hand at home. This workshop promises to surprise and inspire you. No experience necessary. Registration is required. When you register online, we will send suggestions for sourcing materials.
Art & Music
|
March 11, 2021
2021-03-11
|
Live
|
FREE
Virtual Ocean Talk: Captain Cook-Man or Myth?
-
The Australian National Maritime Museum
Join Professor John Maynard and Peter FitzSimons for a pre-recorded live discussion from Apri, 2020, about the legend of Captian Cook. This is part of the Maritime Museum's virtual ocean talk series.
Culture & Politics
|
March 18, 2021
2021-03-18
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Virtual Sea Lion Encounter
-
Shedd Aquarium
It’s Time to meet the sea lions—without leaving home! Experience a live virtual visit with the sea lions that call Shedd home from wherever you are in the world with our brand-new Virtual Sea Lion Encounter—Shedd Aquarium’s first-ever encounter with the sea lions! You may know California sea lions best for their loud vocalizations, and their ability to traverse both land and water. During this encounter you will meet one of the four rescued sea lions at Shedd—Biff, Cruz, Laguna, or Tanner—and learn how their rescue and rehabilitation gave them second chance at life. This 30-minute Virtual Sea Lion Encounter will take place on Zoom so you can enjoy the experience from your own home. During this 30-minute experience, you will meet one of the four rescued sea lions at Shedd up close and observe virtually in a session with our animal care team. Our animal care team will take you "behind the scenes" with the sea lions to learn more about the unique way they swim, their reverberating barks and much more! Whether you call Chicago home or live across the world, we welcome you to join us and virtually meet the sea lions. From family hangouts, to stay-at-home dates, to surprise gifts, experience the aquatic animal world from your home. Each up-close visit will be unique, and we are not able to guarantee any specific sea lion during an experience. This 30-minute virtual encounter will take place on Zoom so you can enjoy the experience from your own home. All questions can be asked live through the chat function and will be responded to by our program host.
Science & Nature
|
March 13, 2021
2021-03-13
|
Live
|
50
Virtual Sea Otter Experience
-
Shedd Aquarium
Meet the sea otters at Shedd Aquarium—virtually! In our new Virtual Sea Otter Encounter, come face-to-face with the playful, adorable sea otters that call Shedd home. This experience is all about getting up close—join us behind the scenes (virtually) for a sea otter play session, watch them dive, socialize, vocalize and groom and find out how their sustainable, restaurant-quality food prep happens. Will you play with pups Cooper and Watson? Watch Yaku’s pocket in action? Visit Luna while she snacks on sea urchins? Dive in and explore the world of sea otters firsthand! This 35–40 minute virtual Sea Otter Encounter will take place on Zoom so you can enjoy the experience without leaving home. Whether you call Chicago home or live across the world, we welcome you to join us during this 35–40 minute experience and virtually meet Luna, Kiana, Cooper, Watson and/or Yaku up close and participate virtually in a session with our animal care team. You’ll go behind the scenes to watch how they can store food in "pockets" under their arms, see how these small animals with big appetites can eat 25% of their body weight in food a day and so much more!
Science & Nature
|
March 10, 2021
2021-03-10
|
Live
|
50
Virtual Shark Feeding Experience
-
Shedd Aquarium
It’s time to meet the sharks—virtually!  Experience a live virtual tour with the sharks that call Shedd home from the comfort of your home during this new, limited-time experience. Join the ocean's most dynamic and misunderstood predators — sharks — and other marine predators for brunch on this virtual feeding tour. Start with a close-up view of the Wild Reef exhibit, which brings you to a Philippine coral reef. Then venture behind the scenes to the animal care area to witness mealtime. You’ll learn how our aquarists prepare meals of restaurant-quality seafood. Discover how each shark and ray species in Wild Reef has been trained to respond to an aquarist’s signal for mealtime. During this 40-minute  virtual tour, get up close with sharks  while you observe a feeding session with our animal care team. Our experts will take you into the waters of the Wild Reef habitat. You will discover what it takes to feed and care for these animals and how that work supports these species in the wild. Whether you call Chicago home or live in another part of the world, we welcome you to join us and virtually meet the sharks. From family hangouts to stay-at-home dates to surprise gifts— experience the aquatic animal world from your home.  Each up-close visit will be unique, and we are not able to guarantee any specific animal during a virtual tour. This 40-minute virtual tour will take place on Zoom. All questions can be asked live through the chat function and responded to by our program host. 
Science & Nature
|
March 13, 2021
2021-03-13
|
Live
|
50
Virtual Tour: Art and Science Highlights
-
Princeton University
Gather with the Molecular Biology Outreach Program (MBOP) and the Princeton University Art Museum for a unique virtual highlights tour that blurs the lines between science and art. An Art Museum student tour guide will discuss the art-historical significance of an artwork while graduate molecular biology students explore the science behind its creation, care, and restoration.
Art & Music
|
March 25, 2021
2021-03-25
|
Live
|
FREE
Virtual Views: Alexander Calder, a Live Q&A
-
Museum of Modern Art
Tune in for a live Q&A with Cara Manes, associate curator in MoMA’s Department of Painting and Sculpture, and Alexander S. C. Rower, president of the Calder Foundation and the artist’s grandson—as part of our Virtual Views initiative. Something you’d like to ask? MoMA members are invited to submit questions via our online form. (And if you miss the live stream, a recorded version will be available here immediately afterward.)
Art & Music
|
March 25, 2021
2021-03-25
|
Live
|
FREE
Virtual Views: Surrealist Women
-
Museum of Modern Art
What is Surrealism? And what did it become in the hands of women artists? The Surrealist gallery is one of the most visited in the Museum. Surrealism connects our daily lives to the world of fantasy, dreams, and desire. While figures like Salvador Dalí, René Magritte, and Max Ernst are often the names that come to mind, a host of intriguing women were associated with the Surrealist movement that emerged between the World Wars, including Claude Cahun, Frida Kahlo, Dora Maar, Meret Oppenheim, and Remedios Varo. These artists both championed Surrealist ideas and pushed against them to create work in which they could explore their unconscious mind and worldly identity. Join actor and writer Abbi Jacobson, star of Broad City and host of our A Piece of Work podcast, and Anne Umland, MoMA’s Blanchette Hooker Rockefeller Senior Curator of Painting and Sculpture, as they explore Surrealism’s creative attraction for women artists and its revolutionary potential then and now. Live event from November, 2020.
Art & Music
|
March 16, 2021
2021-03-16
|
On-Demand
|
FREE
Virtual Voices of the Game: Jenny Dalton-Hill
-
The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum
In our continued celebration of Women's History Month, current ESPN/SEC Analyst Jenny Dalton-Hill will join us to discuss her baseball career. She will reflect on her experience as a member of the 1997 Colorado Silver Bullets as well as her role as a member of the 2010 USA Women's Baseball Team in Venezuela that brought home the bronze medal. Dalton-Hill will also reflect on experiences playing for Hall of Famer Phil Niekro who managed the Silver Bullets. During Niekro's 1997 Baseball Hall of Fame Induction Speech, he saluted the team saying “this is America and this is the land of the free and the home of the brave, and all they want is the chance to play baseball and an opportunity, so I am honored and very privileged to be a part of an organization for the past four years.” Thanks to the support from The Ford Motor Company, this program is free of charge but registration is required.
Culture & Politics
|
March 9, 2021
2021-03-09
|
Live
|
FREE
Virtual Writing Hour
-
Smithsonian Institution
Join Smithsonian and other writers for a virtual, creative writing hour at the National Portrait Gallery! Our goal is to create a virtual space where writers can create, connect, and draw inspiration from the Portrait Gallery's online exhibitions on Google Arts and Culture. We will provide writing prompts, and you are also welcome to bring your own writing project-in-progress. We will write for about 30 minutes and end each session with a brief discussion or reading.
Reading & Writing
|
March 9, 2021
2021-03-09
|
Live
|
FREE
Virtual Yoga from the Garden
-
US Botanic Garden
Join WithLoveDC as they continue the USBG’s weekly community yoga class. Typically offered on-site at the USBG Conservatory or outdoor gardens, the Garden is supporting an online yoga class to continue the program for community health and well-being. During this online class, an instructor from WithLoveDC will guide you through a one-hour meditation and yoga practice via this link. Space is still first-come, first-serve, only the first 500 yogis to log in will be able to practice! Grab a mat and a quiet space. Make sure you have a water bottle close by and maybe light a candle and turn off the lights. Perhaps open the window or practice outside on your porch. We hope that by sharing this practice, separate but together, we can see still feel the love and support of this greater community in this time of uncertainty.
Health & Wellness
|
March 13, 2021
2021-03-13
|
Live
|
FREE
Voices in Leadership During Crises: Mayor Eric Garcetti
-
Harvard University
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti joins the program to discuss issues related to leadership during crises. He will address his response to COVID-19 and vaccinations, systemic racism, and homelessness. Join us on Friday, March 19 from 12-12:45 PM ET to hear this dynamic talk. Moderated by Dr. Howard Koh, Harvey V. Fineberg Professor of the Practice of Public Health Leadership at the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health and the Harvard Kennedy School, as well as Faculty Chair of the Initiative on Health and Homelessness at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.
Culture & Politics
|
March 19, 2021
2021-03-19
|
Live
|
FREE
Water and Oceans: Restoring the Lifeblood of the Planet
-
The New York Times
Oceans may seem otherworldly, but they cover around 70 percent of the Earth’s surface. How do we take collective responsibility for areas that have no national governments? Tune-in to the latest installment of Netting Zero on oceans to find out. Oceans are a crucial part of the biosphere, soaking up carbon dioxide, absorbing more than 90 percent of the excess heat trapped on Earth from carbon emissions and producing half of global oxygen. But as we continue to pump greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, the strain is taking its toll. Action is imperative, but how do we unlock and accelerate ocean-oriented solutions without repeating the mistakes of the past? Join us on March 25 for the debate.
Science & Nature
|
March 25, 2021
2021-03-25
|
Live
|
FREE
Water-Based Painting Two-Weekend Intensive
-
School of the Art Institute of Chicago
In this course students are introduced to traditional and non-traditional materials and methods used in water-based painting. Projects include painting from observation and the imagination, using current artist practices and historical examples. Working from a variety of subjects, students may use ink, acrylic, watercolor, and mixed media within their works while building skills in color, tone, volume, contrast, and temperature. Virtual visits to the Art Institute of Chicago provide inspiration. Classes meet Friday evening, and Saturday and Sunday over two weeks.
Art & Music
|
April 23, 2021
2021-04-23
|
Live
|
750
We Dissent...And We Are Grateful - Celebrating Ruth Bader Ginsburg
-
Brooklyn Museum
Join the Council for Feminist Art for a special virtual program celebrating the words and life of the most distinguished daughter of Brooklyn, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. This one-night-only program on March 15—Justice Ginsburg's birthday—features dramatic readings of the Justice’s most monumental opinions and arguments, from today’s acclaimed feminist voices, including Kathleen Chalfant, Noma Dumezweni, Karen Finley, and more TBA! Tickets for the program start at $50 and include a fully tax-deductible contribution to the Brooklyn Museum’s Feminist Art Fund.
Culture & Politics
|
March 15, 2021
2021-03-15
|
Live
|
$50
What It’s Like to Be A Bird
-
92nd Street Y
Just in time for the Spring bird migration ornithologist and bestselling author and illustrator of The Sibley Guide to Birds, which is celebrating its 20th anniversary David Allen Sibley returns for THREE ALL NEW MASTER CLASSES (final one AUDIENCE Q&A only) talking about his most recent book What It’s Like to be a Bird. If you ever wondered what backyard birds are doing and why or if that’s the same robin that was at your feeder last year won’t want to miss these three new sessions — the final one Q&A only just in time for world migrating bird day on May 8. What It’s Like to be a Bird, is for birders and non-birders alike, and is considered one if not the most comprehensive guides for North American ornithological field identification taking us on a journey of discovery and answering frequently asked questions about the birds we see most often. It’s geared as much to non-birders as it is to the out-and-out obsessed, covering more than two hundred species and including more than 330 new illustrations by the author. While its focus is on familiar backyard birds — blue jays, nuthatches, chickadees — it also examines certain species that can be easily observed, such as the seashore-dwelling Atlantic puffin. David Allen Sibley’s drawings and paintings have always been a way for him to explore nature and his extraordinarily beautiful and exacting artwork combined with his wide-ranging expertise bring observed behaviors vividly to life. While the text is aimed at adults — including fascinating new scientific research on the myriad ways birds have adapted to environmental changes — it is nontechnical, making it the perfect occasion for parents and grandparents to share their love of birds with young children, who will delight in the full-color illustrations of birds in action. You won’t want to miss these three NEW master classes scheduled just in time for the Spring bird migration i which occurs in late April and the first two weeks of May culminating in world migrating bird day on May 8. Come fly with us!
Science & Nature
|
March 16, 2021
2021-03-16
|
Live
|
60
What Will Live Music Look Like When It Returns?
-
WGBH Boston
The coronavirus vaccination rollout is underway, and as many are beginning to dig out of a year marred by a global pandemic, they're also wondering how different things will be. That includes live music. With venues across the globe shattered by the outbreak — not to mention artists, many of whom make their money through live music and have been forced to rehearse, perform, record, and release their music remotely — the entire music industry has shifted in sudden and seismic ways. Even as people consider a return to some sense of live show normalcy, there are new aspects to consider including the greater economic significance of a live performance, vaccine hesitation, and, undoubtedly, a lingering avoidance of crowds and public spaces. What will become of live music, and what will it look like when it returns? This panel, which includes people from all corners of the music industry, will explore the future of live music and what has been forever changed by this pandemic.
Art & Music
|
March 11, 2021
2021-03-11
|
Live
|
FREE
When Two Voices Are Not Enough
-
WGBH Boston
Acclaimed writer and human rights activist Alicia Partnoy, in conversation with pioneer women’s studies scholar Amy Kaminsky, shows us that poetry and storytelling are not just solitary practices. They are critical elements in the struggle for human rights, for survival, and for justice. They call on readers to become participants, to raise their own voices in solidarity.
Reading & Writing
|
March 11, 2021
2021-03-11
|
Live
|
FREE
Whitney Otto in Conversation With Lidia Yuknavitch
-
Powell's City of Books
In Art for the Ladylike (Mad Creek Books), Whitney Otto, author How to Make an American Quilt, limns the lives of eight pioneering women photographers — Sally Mann, Imogen Cunningham, Judy Dater, Ruth Orkin, Tina Modotti, Lee Miller, Madame Yvonne, and Grete Stern — to in turn excavate her own writer’s life. The result is an affecting exploration of what it means to be a woman, what it means to be an artist, and the perils and rewards of being both at once. In considering how feminism, career, and motherhood were entangled throughout her subjects’ lives as they tirelessly sought to render their visions and paved the way for others creating within the bounds of domesticity, Otto assesses her own struggles with balancing writing and the pulls of home life. Ultimately, she ponders the persistent question that artistic women face in a world that devalues women’s ambition: If what we love is what we are, how do those of us with multiple loves forge lives with room for everything? Otto will be joined in conversation by Lidia Yuknavitch, author of Verge and The Book of Joan.
Reading & Writing
|
March 18, 2021
2021-03-18
|
Live
|
FREE
Why Are We Still Talking About Race? Historical Contexts of Today's Racial Conflicts in the U.S.
-
University of Wisconsin
Emeritus Professor Pamela Oliver taught the class Ethnic Movements in the U.S. at University of Wisconsin for over 30 years. This short course draws on that class, offering a broad overview of the racial history of the U.S. with opportunities for more in?depth consideration of some topics based on student interest. Each session will include both lecture and time for questions and discussion. Major themes of the course are: Why are we still talking about race? How does race fit in with the U.S. national identity? How can people shape a racial future for the U.S. in light of history? How can people with different interests and experiences live together?
Culture & Politics
|
March 23, 2021
2021-03-23
|
Live
|
65
Women's Leadership in the Federal Government
-
University of North Carolina
Women have long been underrepresented in key sectors of the United States federal government, and especially in positions of leadership in the US federal government. This is particularly true for women of color. While recognizing these facts, this panel highlights women who have held or currently hold positions of leadership working for our country. They will talk about their careers, provide advice to others looking to enter US government service, consider the challenges specific to women in government leadership, and also discuss the strengths that women have brought to federal careers and the benefits that await them. The panelists are a distinguished and diverse group of leaders. More about them on the registration page. Free with advance registration.
Culture & Politics
|
March 9, 2021
2021-03-09
|
Live
|
FREE
Wonderful Women Creating Change: Wonder Woman & The Smithsonian
-
Smithsonian Institution
To celebrate Women’s History Month in March and the recent release of Wonder Woman 1984 (filmed and set at the Smithsonian!), join us for the first in our Women’s History with Smithsonian Libraries and Archives program series, sponsored by Deloitte, "Wonderful Women Creating Change." You'll learn about our own connections to this iconic character and hear what it was really like to be a woman working at the Smithsonian in the 1970s and 1980s. Lilla Vekerdy, Head and Curator of Special Collections, and Elizabeth Harmon, Digital Curator of the History of Smithsonian Women in Science, will share behind-the-scenes insights into the intriguing contents of our collection of materials from the creator of Wonder Woman, William Moulton Marston, and our fascinating Smithsonian records that document the experiences of real women.
Culture & Politics
|
March 10, 2021
2021-03-10
|
Live
|
FREE
Workshop: Wines of France
-
French Institute: Alliance Francaise
In this workshop you will gain a solid understanding of French wine. You’ll discover how French wines are made, how to differentiate between good and bad wine, and how to pair wine with food. This workshop is perfect for you if you want to increase your knowledge of French wine, find the best wine according to your budget, and impress your guests with informed wine selections. This workshop will be conducted primarily in English with some French vocabulary. Themes: Red wines from Bordeaux, Burgundy, Beaujolais, Côte du Rhône, and the Southwest. White and rosé from Alsace, Burgundy, Loire and Provence, with a look at sparkling wines such as Crémant and Champagne.
Food & Drink
|
April 9, 2021
2021-04-09
|
Live
|
59
Writing Escape (Online)
-
The Second City
Like indoor recess for adults, Second City’s online Writing Escape Series is the perfect way to break up the routine of physical isolation/working from home - all without leaving your living room. No prior experience is necessary for this fun, relaxed introduction to some of the skills of writing comedy. Over the course of four weeks, you’ll meet new people and learn writing techniques in supportive, laugh-filled 90-minute sessions. Join alone or sign up with friends! Please note that this class will take place entirely online. You will be emailed a unique link for video conferencing the day of your class.
Reading & Writing
|
March 8, 2021
2021-03-08
|
Live
|
95
Writing a Brilliant First Page
-
Johns Hopkins University Odyssey Program
The first page of your novel, story, or memoir is key to capturing readers' attention. In this class, students will analyze excellent first pages from published works of various genres and apply what they learn to their own work. Each student will have their first page critiqued by the class.
Reading & Writing
|
April 6, 2021
2021-04-06
|
Live
|
$105
Yotam Ottolenghi with Claire Saffitz on Flavor
-
Chicago Humanities Festival
Chef Yotam Ottolenghi (best known for his cookbook Jerusalem) is a major inspiration for our quarantine cooking. Ottolenghi Flavor, his latest cookbook of 100+ plant-based recipes (that also pair great with meat) has us upping our vegetable game for every meal with inventive, delicious, and easy-to-make home cooked dishes. Ottolenghi seasons our virtual stage with an exclusive cooking demo of his famous One-Pan Orecchiette Puttanesca and a conversation about the key elements of preparing wonderful food (process, pairing, produce) and his revolutionary approach to flavor. Ottolenghi is joined at CHF by program host, pastry chef Claire Saffitz.
Food & Drink
|
March 17, 2021
2021-03-17
|
Live
|
FREE
at home: Artists in Conversation | Rachel Rose
-
Yale University
Gather with us for lively and inspiring conversations with some of today’s most notable artists. "at home: Artists in Conversation" brings together curators and artists to discuss various artistic practices and insights into their work. Rose (b. 1986) is an American visual artist known for her video installations. Her work explores how our changing relationship to landscape has shaped storytelling and belief systems. She draws from, and contributes to, a long history of cinematic innovation, and through her subjects—whether investigating cryogenics, the American Revolutionary War, modernist architecture, or the sensory experience of walking in outer space—she questions what it is that makes us human and the ways we seek to alter and escape that designation. Among her recent projects are Enclosure (2019), jointly commissioned by the Park Avenue Armory in New York and LUMA Foundation in Arles, and Palisades (2015), presented at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery in London, among many others. Rose won the illy Present Future Prize at the Turin-based art fair Artissima in 2014 and the Frieze Artist Award for site-specific installations by emerging artists at the London fair in 2015. Her work has been exhibited widely throughout the world.
Art & Music
|
March 12, 2021
2021-03-12
|
Live
|
FREE
iPhone Photography Online
-
The International Center of Photography
As the popular saying goes, "The best camera in the world is the one that's with you." In this hands-on weekend workshop students learn how to elevate their photos from casual snapshots to frame-worthy personal images using only an iPhone. Topics include: highlighting your subject, framing and composition, using light and shadow to create mood and depth, as well as photo editing apps. Open to All Skill Levels: Students ranging from beginner to experienced will be successful in classes.
Film & Photography
|
April 10, 2021
2021-04-10
|
Live
|
185