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Lunch Break Science: Genes and the Environment with Ainash Childebayeva
Lunch Break Science: Genes and the Environment with Ainash Childebayeva
-
The Leakey Foundation
In this week's edition of Lunch Break Science, join Leakey Foundation grantee Ainash Childebayeva to learn about interactions between our genes and the environment. Childebayeva is a PhD candidate in Biological Anthropology and Toxicology at the University of Michigan. Her research is on the epigenomic signatures of adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia in the Peruvian Andes. Her research interests include human evolutionary genetics, human epigenetics, gene x environment interactions, and aDNA.
Science & Nature
|
October 22, 2021
2021-10-22
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
Virtual Views: Surrealist Women
Virtual Views: Surrealist Women
-
Museum of Modern Art
What is Surrealism? And what did it become in the hands of women artists? The Surrealist gallery is one of the most visited in the Museum. Surrealism connects our daily lives to the world of fantasy, dreams, and desire. While figures like Salvador Dalí, René Magritte, and Max Ernst are often the names that come to mind, a host of intriguing women were associated with the Surrealist movement that emerged between the World Wars, including Claude Cahun, Frida Kahlo, Dora Maar, Meret Oppenheim, and Remedios Varo. These artists both championed Surrealist ideas and pushed against them to create work in which they could explore their unconscious mind and worldly identity. Join actor and writer Abbi Jacobson, star of Broad City and host of our A Piece of Work podcast, and Anne Umland, MoMA’s Blanchette Hooker Rockefeller Senior Curator of Painting and Sculpture, as they explore Surrealism’s creative attraction for women artists and its revolutionary potential then and now. Live event from November, 2020.
Art & Music
|
October 22, 2021
2021-10-22
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
Birds of the World: Amazing Migrations
Birds of the World: Amazing Migrations
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Cornell University
Join Cornell's famed Bird Lab and discover which birds have the longest, highest, fastest, and farthest flights, among other fascinating migration facts during this webinar. We’ll take a tour of the Earth’s most remarkable migratory birds and demonstrate how to use Birds of the World, an online database including over 10,700 species accounts. See stunning photos and learn something new! This event is part of our virtual Migration Celebration. Visit the Migration Celebration webpage for the full schedule of events, migration resources, and family-friendly activities.
Science & Nature
|
October 22, 2021
2021-10-22
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
Cassandra Quave: The Plant Hunter
Cassandra Quave: The Plant Hunter
-
New York Botanical Garden
Plants are the basis for an array of lifesaving and health-improving medicines that we now often take for granted. In today’s world of synthetic pharmaceuticals, many people have lost this connection to the natural world. But ignoring the potential of medicinal plants could represent a missed opportunity to discover new medicines and protect against the growing threat of antibiotic-resistant infections. In this webinar, Emory University Associate Professor Cassandra Quave shares stories of her quest to discover nature’s next medicines. From flooded forests of the Amazon to isolated mountaintops in Albania and Kosovo, Dr. Quave’s search for natural compounds, long-known to traditional healers, could help save us all from the looming crisis of untreatable superbugs, as her acclaimed new book, The Plant Hunter, explains.
Science & Nature
|
October 22, 2021
2021-10-22
|
Live
|
$
FREE
The Case for Cross-Cultural Dialogues
The Case for Cross-Cultural Dialogues
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Georgetown University
What do we really know about the rich history and heritage of China, and how does it compare with the history and heritage of the West? What is Chinese literature, and how did it develop? What were the dominant philosophies that helped the development of Chinese culture in art, music, and performance? Where do the Chinese go for entertainment? These questions will be discussed by a panel of Chinese enthusiasts in the first of a new series looking at the comparisons between the cultures of China and the West. In this webinar U.K. historians Michael Wood and Kerry Brown will discuss their enthusiasm for Chinese literature, art, and performance with Kathryn Temple of Georgetown University and Tong Ping, a native of Chengdu—a city famed for its pandas but also as an intersection of differing Chinese cultures. The discussion will be co-chaired by Michael Scott, who has held fellowships at two Chinese universities and published a book in China on the stories of King Arthur, and Barnaby Powell, a veteran of development banking in East Asia and co-author of three books on China.
Culture & Politics
|
October 22, 2021
2021-10-22
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Online Workshop: Printing with Albumen & Salt
Online Workshop: Printing with Albumen & Salt
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Eastman Museum
Learn the two most popular printing processes of the nineteenth century: salt and albumen. The salted paper print process, which results in warm brown matte prints, was introduced by William Henry Fox Talbot in the 1830s. The albumen printing process, creating glossy black-and-white images, was invented by Louis Désiré Blanquart-Evrard in 1850. Both processes are based on silver chloride printing out techniques, and were used well into the latter half of the century. In this online workshop, Historic Process Specialist Nick Brandreth will guide participants through the steps of creating both types of prints, from preparing the emulsion, to printing and processing, and displaying the finished pieces. Limited to ten participants.
Film & Photography
|
October 22, 2021
2021-10-22
|
Live
|
$
375
Back to Earth: What Life in Space Taught Me About Our Home Planet―And Our Mission to Protect It
Back to Earth: What Life in Space Taught Me About Our Home Planet―And Our Mission to Protect It
-
National Archives of the United States
In Back to Earth, NASA astronaut Nicole Stott imparts essential lessons in problem-solving, survival, and crisis response that each of us can practice to make change. Stott shares stories from her time on the International Space Station as well as insights from scientists, activists, and change-makers working to solve our greatest environmental challenges. Ultimately, Stott reveals how we each have the power to respect our planetary home and one another by living our lives like crewmates, not passengers, on an inspiring shared mission.
Reading & Writing
|
October 22, 2021
2021-10-22
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Farmers' Market Treasures
Farmers' Market Treasures
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US Botanic Garden
On the lead-up to Thanksgiving, farmers’ markets roll out brilliant and beautiful cool weather crops like broccoli, cauliflower, and cabbages, as well as sun-cured squashes in all shapes and colors. The bounty is breathtaking and can be a little overwhelming. Join the Cook Sisters as they deconstruct the blitz of choices and cook up two terrific fall dishes that will complement an everyday meal or a special feast.
Food & Drink
|
October 22, 2021
2021-10-22
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Jonathan Cohn: Obamacare and the Unfinished Crusade for Universal Coverage
Jonathan Cohn: Obamacare and the Unfinished Crusade for Universal Coverage
-
The University of Michigan
Jonathan Cohn is a senior national correspondent at HuffPost, where he covers politics and policy. He will discuss his book, “The Ten Year War: Obamacare and the Unfinished Crusade for Universal Coverage,” which examines how the Affordable Care Act — better known as “Obamacare” — came to be, why it looks like it does, and what it has meant for average Americans. The virtual conversation is free and open to the public, and U-M students can participate as part of a one-credit course, SWK 503 Section 001. This event is part of the annual Real-World Perspectives on Poverty Solutions fall speaker series, which introduces key issues regarding the causes and consequences of poverty featuring experts in policy and practice from across the nation, with the goal of encouraging the formation of a broad community of learners to engage in these issues together.
Culture & Politics
|
October 22, 2021
2021-10-22
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Supernatural Stories
Supernatural Stories
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WGBH Boston
Do you believe in the GHOSTS? Join GBH and our expert in folklore and legends Jeff Belanger during this Supernatural Stories event where he will take the audience on a journey through the ghosts, legends, and monsters that put the FEAR into this spooky time of year. There will be plenty of opportunity to ask Jeff all your questions about folklore.Jeff Belanger is an author, podcaster, storyteller, adventurer, and explorer of the unexplained. He’s written more than a dozen books that have been published in six languages, he’s the Emmy-nominated host, writer, and producer of the New England Legends series on PBS and Amazon Prime, he provides programs and lectures to audiences all over the world, and he’s been the writer and researcher for every episode of Ghost Adventures on the Travel Channel. Jeff has made media appearances on hundreds of radio and television programs over his 20-year career, and he has a passion for mysteries and legends.Note that this event will not be recorded. Ticket holders must attend at the time of the event in order to experience this content.
Reading & Writing
|
October 22, 2021
2021-10-22
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Unexpected Views: Henri Rousseau's 'Surprised!'
Unexpected Views: Henri Rousseau's 'Surprised!'
-
The National Gallery
Unexpected views are monthly conversations between our curators and some of the most important cultural practitioners of today. Discussions focus on a selected masterpiece from the National Gallery Collection, exploring its relevance to the artist’s work, or more broadly to current social and cultural issues. By allowing for new discussions of the Old Masters, the series aims for critical, counter-intuitive and joyful approaches to our collection, which reflect the breadth of contemporary artistic practice. For this session, Beirut-born artist Ali Cherri takes a contemporary look at nature through the lens of Henri Rousseau's 'Surprised!' Ali Cherri is the second and current Artist in Residence at the National Gallery. Cherri uses sculpture, film and installation to pursue the meaning of the built environment and its histories. Often using archaeological relics and sites as a starting point, Cherri’s varied practice explores the processes of excavation, relocation and the museum classification of objects, animal artefacts, images, and their narratives. Free with advance registration.
Art & Music
|
October 22, 2021
2021-10-22
|
Live
|
$
FREE
The World Around in Focus: Land
The World Around in Focus: Land
-
Guggenheim Museums
This online public program focuses on artists, researchers, designers, and architects whose work makes visible the often invisible infrastructures and systems that are transforming lives and territories across the Americas today. Featuring commissioned films and live conversation, the event presents long-term projects and in-process research, artworks and activism that address the complex post-colonial issues of land use in the twenty-first century, and shares campaigns and designs for a more equitable future. Participants include environmental activists focused on #landback, indigenous food sovereignty, and water equity; filmmakers and artists interrogating literal and metaphorical mining for digital currencies; and climate leaders with visionary ideas for a geoengineered future. This program is free and will be broadcast on the museum’s YouTube channel. RSVP for updates and to receive a tune-in reminder.
Art & Music
|
October 22, 2021
2021-10-22
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Pursuing Equity for the COVID Vaccine
Pursuing Equity for the COVID Vaccine
-
University of Virginia
Join the University of Virginia's Center for Global Health Equity and UVA's Miller Center for an important conversation about the global distribution of the the COVID-19 vaccine. Student scholars and faculty mentors who are working to develop innovative approaches to addressing health disparities speak about pivotal issues that promote global health equity.
Science & Nature
|
October 22, 2021
2021-10-22
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Traditional Japanese Art from the Bernstein Family Collection
Traditional Japanese Art from the Bernstein Family Collection
-
Dartmouth College
Join Dartmouth's Hood Museum for a live-streamed lecture with Melissa McCormick, Professor of Japanese Art and Culture at Harvard University. More details will appear as the event approaches.
Art & Music
|
October 22, 2021
2021-10-22
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Getty Get-Togethers
Getty Get-Togethers
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Getty
Recharge by taking a participatory journey into the Getty Museum collection with a gallery educator and other art enthusiasts from around the world. Discover new ways of connecting with art and each other online through a shared experience of close looking and discussion. Whether you are an avid museum-goer or a first-timer, come as you are for this casual, hour-long session. Theme changes monthly. Free. All adult learners are welcome. Advance registration is required to access the Zoom meeting. Limited space available. October Theme: Mythology & Legends
Art & Music
|
October 22, 2021
2021-10-22
|
Live
|
$
FREE
How to Write a New Yorker Cartoon Caption
How to Write a New Yorker Cartoon Caption
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The New Yorker
Have you marveled at how New Yorker cartoon captions are so clever and so...just perfect? Have you ever tried your hand at the weekly cartoon caption contest? Take a quick tutorial from two actors that will spark some creative energy to try again! Ellie Kemper and Daniel Radcliffe, stars of “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt: Kimmy vs. the Reverend,” team up for The New Yorker’s Cartoon Caption Contest.
Reading & Writing
|
October 23, 2021
2021-10-23
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
Lunch Break Science: Andrea Baden and Stacey Tecot
Lunch Break Science: Andrea Baden and Stacey Tecot
-
The Leakey Foundation
Gather with Leakey Foundation grantees Andrea Baden and Stacey Tecot on this special Earth Day episode of Lunch Break Science and learn about lemur behavior and ecology.
Science & Nature
|
October 23, 2021
2021-10-23
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
NightSchool: Hi-Res Reefs
NightSchool: Hi-Res Reefs
-
California Academy of Sciences
From high-res satellite images to 360-degree panoramas to remote-controlled underwater microscopes, coral reef research is at the cutting-edge of technology. Learn about several of these exciting projects and meet scientists and engineers finding new ways to look at these critical and complex ecosystems.
Science & Nature
|
October 23, 2021
2021-10-23
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
Aspects of Anne Lovell: Holbein’s Intriguing Portrait of a Lady and a Squirrel
Aspects of Anne Lovell: Holbein’s Intriguing Portrait of a Lady and a Squirrel
-
Getty
Among the most captivating of portraits by German artist Hans Holbein the Younger is A Lady with a Squirrel and a Starling. Painted between 1526–28, during his first trip to England, this enigmatic work exemplifies Holbein’s sophisticated approach to portraiture, as well as the challenges Renaissance portraits occasionally pose for modern researchers. In this talk, Holbein specialist Susan Foister presents an illustrated talk on the presumed subject, Anne Lovell, and other portraits of women in Holbein’s work. She closely examines Holbein’s painting methods and his remarkable ability to create meaning beyond simple representation. The program concludes with a conversation with Anne Woollett, curator of paintings at the Getty Museum and of the exhibition, Holbein: Capturing Character in the Renaissance.
Art & Music
|
October 23, 2021
2021-10-23
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Shapes, Colors, Character: Writing Inspired by Lynda Benglis
Shapes, Colors, Character: Writing Inspired by Lynda Benglis
-
National Gallery of Art
Guided by local author and teacher Tara Campbell, explore the steps to creating dynamic characters, then write some of your own character descriptions inspired by the “bold, physical, and tactile” work of Lynda Benglis. We’ll take you through her virtual exhibition to discover elements of compelling human characters in artworks such as Jeantaud and Pani Rang #17. The Lynda Benglis exhibition is on view in the National Gallery of Art’s East Building now through January 2, 2022.
Reading & Writing
|
October 23, 2021
2021-10-23
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Stopping Anti-Asian Racism in its Tracks: Acting for Justice and Empowerment
Stopping Anti-Asian Racism in its Tracks: Acting for Justice and Empowerment
-
Berkeley Repertory Theater
This workshop/teach-in will explore ways of resisting, defusing, transforming racism with a focus on anti-Asian hatred, aggression, and violence. This approach is designed to give participants concrete tools and insights, empowering you to be an active agent--an actor--in any situation, rather than a victim or a spectator to violence. This allows the insight, healing, and true empowerment that comes from awareness, preparedness, and genuine solidarity in justice. No theater experience required. Please dress to move.
Culture & Politics
|
October 23, 2021
2021-10-23
|
Live
|
$
85
Walter Isaacson on Jennifer Doudna
Walter Isaacson on Jennifer Doudna
-
Chicago Humanities Festival
Walter Isaacson—the acclaimed biographer of Steve Jobs, Leonardo da Vinci, Albert Einstein, and Benjamin Franklin—turns his pen to another transformative figure: Jennifer Doudna, the Nobel Prize-winning creator of the gene editing technology CRISPR. Code Breaker explores the medical miracles Doudna’s scientific discoveries have made possible and the moral questions they pose. Isaacson is joined at CHF by WBEZ’s Chief Content Officer Steve Edwards to discuss Doudna’s inspiring career, gene editing, and how new inventions affect the future of humanity.
Science & Nature
|
October 24, 2021
2021-10-24
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
Mars Surface Exploration: Past, Present, Future
Mars Surface Exploration: Past, Present, Future
-
Pacific Science Center
On July 4, 1976, NASA landed its first spacecraft on the surface of Mars. Called Viking, this expedition included only a lander with a long arm. Due to the vast expense and relatively little yield for the effort, the mission wasn’t repeated. Fast forward to the 1990’s, and NASA undertook a less expensive but very aggressive mission – Pathfinder. Pathfinder changed the game for the exploration of Mars and launched the programs we know today. While human curiosity for Mars has remained constant, the questions we seek answers to have changed and evolved, requiring different tools. What’s changed? What’s remained the same? And what’s next? Chris Voorhees, former NASA Lead Engineer, shares his experiences as a lead engineer working on Mars Rovers over the decades – from the early days of Pathfinder to the Spirit, Opportunity, and Curiosity missions, and finally the work he and his team at First Mode have undertaken for the latest launch: Mars 2020, Perseverance. Chris also discusses insights and lessons learned over two decades of Mars exploration, examining the past, the present, and the future.
Science & Nature
|
October 24, 2021
2021-10-24
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
Cartooning for Beginners
Cartooning for Beginners
-
92nd Street Y
This remote course is designed to instill a working understanding of cartoon design and graphic novel art. Discover basics like anatomy, foreshortening, shading, environment, and composition. Learn how to handle tools and apply ink, first in a series of short value studies, then moving onto applying inks to concept work. Students will tackle several different short story projects and stand-alone pieces and build their vocabulary as a cartoonist.
Art & Music
|
October 24, 2021
2021-10-24
|
Live
|
$
190
Virtual Penguin Encounter
Virtual Penguin Encounter
-
Shedd Aquarium
It’s time to meet the penguins—virtually! Experience a live virtual visit with the penguins that call Shedd home from your home with our brand-new Virtual Penguin Encounter with Shedd Aquarium. You’ve followed the penguins on their adventures. Now for a limited time, you can meet them up close in their habitat! Will you waddle with Wellington? Hang out with rockhopper penguin pair Edward and Annie? Meet Magellanic penguins Izzy and Darwin?
Science & Nature
|
October 24, 2021
2021-10-24
|
Live
|
$
49.95
National Security and Press Freedom
National Security and Press Freedom
-
Chicago Humanities Festival
A central question of democracy is how to balance a government’s need to conduct national security operations in secret with the public’s right to know what their government is doing. The answer—debated to this day—is both a complex policy judgment and an equally complex judgment about the meaning of the First Amendment rights to freedom of speech and the press. Legal scholar Geoffrey Stone (coauthor of National Security, Leaks, and Freedom of the Press) convenes a panel with former director of the CIA John Brennan and Washington Post national security reporter Ellen Nakashima (two of the book’s contributors) to discuss secrecy, disclosure, security, and the First Amendment. This program is the first panel in our new series Deep Dive: Speech, curated by Geoffrey Stone. This 3-part series curated and hosted by legal scholar Geoffrey Stone (Edward H. Levi Distinguished Service Professor of Law, University of Chicago) will consider a variety of perspectives on free speech in the 21st century. We'll explore some of the forces driving wide-ranging debates around First Amendment rights in our moment, including freedom of the press and national security, the role of social media platforms and internet companies, and hate speech.
Culture & Politics
|
October 25, 2021
2021-10-25
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
Lunch Break Science | Melissa Emery Thompson
Lunch Break Science | Melissa Emery Thompson
-
The Leakey Foundation
Meet Leakey Foundation scientist Melissa Emery Thompson and learn about the life histories of the chimpanzees of Kanyawara region of Kibale National Park, Uganda. Thompson is Director, Center for Comparative Human Primate Physiology at University of New Mexico.
Science & Nature
|
October 25, 2021
2021-10-25
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
Making Connections: Susan Meiselas in Conversation
Making Connections: Susan Meiselas in Conversation
-
V&A Museum
American photographer Susan Meiselas first achieved international renown for her photographs documenting conflict in Central America in the 1970s and 1980s. Her photographs from this period included monochrome and colour works, which at the time were both pioneering and controversial. A member of the Magnum agency since 1976, she has worked in colour and black and white throughout her career to communicate her role as a witness to world events, and to connect audiences with the subjects depicted. Meiselas will be in conversation with Dr Marta Weiss, V&A Senior Curator of Photography.
Film & Photography
|
October 25, 2021
2021-10-25
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Rethinking the US Constitution Through a Participatory Process
Rethinking the US Constitution Through a Participatory Process
-
Harvard Kennedy School
What would it be like to really rethink our Constitution? In this webinar, we will learn about participatory constitution building, a way of writing a new constitution with full public participation. Participatory constitution building is common around the world, but how it is designed and the process by which it is undertaken is critical to making it a success anywhere. We will learn with experts on participatory constitution building globally, in Chile at this moment, and among tribal governments. What are the practices we might think about as we reconsider the strengths and weaknesses of our own constitution in this country? Registration is required for this event. Please register using the link above to receive details via email for how to join the virtual discussion. This event will be recorded and a link to the recording will be sent out afterward to all who register. You can submit questions to the panelists in advance during the registration process. A live Q&A will also be available during the event with an option to submit questions in real-time.
Culture & Politics
|
October 25, 2021
2021-10-25
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Art Hx | A Conversation with the Curators of Designing Motherhood
Art Hx | A Conversation with the Curators of Designing Motherhood
-
Princeton University
What do the pregnancy test, the pessary, the at-home abortion kit, the state of family leave, midwifery care, and postpartum practices have in common, and why do designs that matter so much often go so unremarked? The designed objects and systems that surround us when it comes to menstruation, birth control, (contra)conception, pregnancy, childbirth, and postpartum vary as oddly, messily, and dramatically as the stereotypes suggest. Designing Motherhood unfolds the compelling design histories and real-world uses of the designs that shape our reproductive experiences. In a book, two-part exhibition, design curriculum, Storybanking initiative, and public programming series, this project unfolds the iconic, conceptual, archaic, titillating, emotionally charged, or just plain strange designs that have defined the relationships between people and babies during the past century. Join Michelle Millar Fisher, the Wornick Curator of Contemporary Decorative Arts at MFA Boston, and Amber Winick, writer and design historian, as they discuss the project and their vital partnership with thought leaders at the Philadelphia-based Maternity Care Coalition, a forty year old organization dedicated to improving the lives of pregnant and parenting families, and their children, ages 0-3. This event is organized as a part of Art Hx: Visual and Medical Legacies of British Colonialism. During the 2021-2022 academic year, Art Hx presents curative / spaces, a programming series that explores the relationship between race, space, and healthcare through the lens of art and design. We will host a range of events that consider how experiences of race and medicine are spatially produced in architecture, design, and in the circulation of art. We want to reflect on how these relationships affect access to resources, meanings about the body, and people’s understandings and conceptions of healthcare. We hope the series will help us imaginatively redesign these processes of health injustice and build new practices of care together through art’s ability to transform society.
Art & Music
|
October 25, 2021
2021-10-25
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Claire McCaskill: Weil Lecture on American Citizenship
Claire McCaskill: Weil Lecture on American Citizenship
-
University of North Carolina
Claire McCaskill will deliver the Fall 2021 Weil Lecture on American Citizenship on October 25, 2021 in a virtual event live from Hill Hall. The lecture will be free and open to the public via Zoom. Registration required. Claire McCaskill has spent her career as a prosecutor and elected official devoted to public service and earned a reputation in the U.S. Senate as a plain-spoken, independent, and effective champion for Missourians and all Americans.
Culture & Politics
|
October 25, 2021
2021-10-25
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Slow Looking
Slow Looking
-
Museum of Modern Art
Dance/movement psychotherapist Jennifer Sterling leads this Slow Looking session along with staff in MoMA’s Department of Education. In this 75-minute workshop, explore a photograph by the artist Roy DeCarava through a series of guided activities, including close looking, writing, drawing, and movement. Our intention is to offer a welcoming, calm space for individuals to experience and respond to art together. This session is part of the initiative Artful Practices for Well-Being, which offers ideas for connectedness and healing through art.
Film & Photography
|
October 25, 2021
2021-10-25
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Mexican Cultural and Political History: The Evolution of Modern Mexico
Mexican Cultural and Political History: The Evolution of Modern Mexico
-
Rice University
This lecture series considers key topics in the evolution of modern Mexico. The course spans five centuries, beginning with the indigenous societies conquered by the European invasion and the culture that emerged under 300 years of Spanish colonial rule. It reviews Mexico’s complex independence movement, the struggles of Mexican liberalism, and the accomplishments and failures of nearly three decades of autocratic rule under Porfirio Díaz. We also examine the Mexican Revolution, its causes, its ideologies and its aftermath. The class looks at the 71 years during which Mexico was ruled by the PRI, the Institutional Revolutionary Party, characterized by Peruvian writer Mario Vargas Llosa as “the perfect dictatorship.” The last two sessions discuss neoliberalism and its discontents followed by a survey of challenges facing contemporary Mexico. A recurrent theme throughout the series is the country’s complex relationship with the United States.
Culture & Politics
|
October 25, 2021
2021-10-25
|
Live
|
$
210
Osher Mini Medical School: Advancing Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in Medicine
Osher Mini Medical School: Advancing Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in Medicine
-
UCSF
Racism and white supremacy are fierce, ever present and challenging forces that are the fabric of the United States from slavery through emancipation, Jim Crow segregation and Civil Rights. They impact the thinking, behavior and actions of individuals and institutions, including professional education and health care. The pernicious nature of racial and ethnic inequities requires a long-term commitment to change through education, systems changes and individual action. Last year, during the COVID-19 pandemic and reeling from the tragic death of George Floyd, UCSF launched the Anti-Racism Initiative to address the impact of systemic racism on the health, health care and life expectancy of Black, Indigenous and other people of color (BIPOC) communities. This unique course will feature UCSF leaders of the Anti-Racism Initiative and discuss the impact and opportunity of this work for all.
Health & Wellness
|
October 25, 2021
2021-10-25
|
Live
|
$
75
Improv 1 Online
Improv 1 Online
-
The Second City
Improv 1 introduces students to the fundamental concept of “Yes, And” in improvisation. Through group exercises and games, students will explore impulse & spontaneity, listening, being present in the moment, taking risks, finding agreement (making & accepting offers) and other basic building blocks of improvisation, all in a supportive environment that embraces the idea of trusting yourself and failing joyfully.Please note that this class will take place entirely online. You will be emailed a unique link for video conferencing the day of your class.
Art & Music
|
October 25, 2021
2021-10-25
|
Live
|
$
345
A Sonic Tour of LACMA's Modern Art Galleries
A Sonic Tour of LACMA's Modern Art Galleries
-
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Join dublab founder Mark “Frosty” McNeill and LACMA curator Katia Zavistovski for a virtual walkthrough of the newly reopened Modern Art Galleries based on the music soundtrack created to accompany the installation. The conversation will explore connections between visual and audio mediums, and will highlight multiple genres and tones. Presented on Zoom.
Art & Music
|
October 25, 2021
2021-10-25
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Lunch Break Science: Nicole Thompson
Lunch Break Science: Nicole Thompson
-
The Leakey Foundation
Gather with Leakey Foundation grantee Nicole Thompson and learn about the benefits of social connections during development in blue monkeys in Kakamega, Kenya.
Science & Nature
|
October 26, 2021
2021-10-26
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
Artist Talk: Gabriel Rico
Artist Talk: Gabriel Rico
-
Nasher Sculpture Center
Artist Gabriel Rico joined the Chief Curator Jed Morse in April, 2021, for a talk exploring the power of dreams, the meaning of objects, and the language of mathematics. Rico's elegant compositions propose new ways of understanding civilization and its relationship with the natural world through the juxtaposition of disparate objects, each of which comes with its own constellation of meanings and associations.
Art & Music
|
October 26, 2021
2021-10-26
|
Live
|
$
FREE
BeMoved® with Jennifer Edgcomb
BeMoved® with Jennifer Edgcomb
-
University of Chicago Arts
Join Lucky Plush and University of Chicago Arts for this accessible dance class led by instructor Jennifer Edgcomb. BeMoved® is a dance experience designed to inspire anyone from first-time dancers to professionals to embrace dance as a lifelong means to health, joy, and fulfillment. See BeMovedDance.com to learn more.
Health & Wellness
|
October 26, 2021
2021-10-26
|
Live
|
$
5
COVID-19, Science, and the Media: Lessons Learned Reporting on the Pandemic
COVID-19, Science, and the Media: Lessons Learned Reporting on the Pandemic
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Harvard University
In January 2020, reports began to circulate internationally of a pneumonia-like illness spreading in China. Little was known about the novel pathogen, SARS-CoV-2, at that time. As scientists and public health experts worked to understand the virus, reporters worked to communicate to the public the state of the knowledge — an ever-shifting ground. From the transmission debate, to the origins investigation, to changes in mask guidance, to vaccine safety concerns, the COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted a particularly precarious nexus of science, politics, journalism, social media, and policy. This panel discussion will reflect on this tenuous situation, potential areas of improvement in pandemic reporting, and lessons learned from recent experience.
Culture & Politics
|
October 26, 2021
2021-10-26
|
Live
|
$
FREE
The Twelve Caesars with Mary Beard and Stephen Greenblatt
The Twelve Caesars with Mary Beard and Stephen Greenblatt
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92nd Street Y
Mary Beard, one of the world’s leading classicists, tells the fascinating story of how images of Roman autocrats have influenced art, culture, and the representation of power for more than 2,000 years. What does the face of power look like? Who gets commemorated in art and why? And how do we react to statues of politicians we deplore? Against a background of today’s “sculpture wars”, Mary Beard tells the story of how for more than two millennia portraits of the rich, powerful, and famous in the western world have been shaped by the image of Roman emperors, especially the “twelve Caesars,” from the ruthless Julius Caesar to the fly-torturing Domitian. On a tour through 2,000 years of art and cultural history, she asks why these murderous autocrats have loomed so large in art from antiquity and the Renaissance to today, when hapless leaders are still caricatured as Neros fiddling while Rome burns. Rather than a story of a simple repetition of stable, blandly conservative images of imperial men and women, Beard’s new book, Twelve Caesars, is an unexpected tale of changing identities, clueless or deliberate misidentifications, fakes, and often ambivalent representations of authority. Join this conversation with Beard and Harvard Professor Stephen Greenblatt.
Reading & Writing
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October 26, 2021
2021-10-26
|
Live
|
$
25
Virtual Voices of the Game: Carlos Peña
Virtual Voices of the Game: Carlos Peña
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The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum
Join former player and baseball analyst and broadcaster, Carlos Peña, as we discuss the museum's latest YouTube series, HOF Connections. Thanks to the support from The Ford Motor Company, this program is free of charge but registration is required.
Culture & Politics
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October 26, 2021
2021-10-26
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Losing the Longest War: Afghanistan, 2001-21
Losing the Longest War: Afghanistan, 2001-21
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Cornell University
Afghanistan was America’s longest war, stretching over nearly 20 years from 2001 to 2020. It started with the white hot fury of 9/11, continued through the death of Osama Bin Laden, and went on as America mostly forgot why it was there. The war ended badly, with a hurried evacuation as the structures the US had worked to build crumbled almost immediately. This webinar will look at the history of the war in Afghanistan and the larger history of a kind of war the United States finds particularly challenging, analyzing what went wrong in the Afghan war and why future wars of the type are likely to have similar endings.
Culture & Politics
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October 26, 2021
2021-10-26
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Seatangled: A Conversation on Irish Literature, Modernism, and the Sea
Seatangled: A Conversation on Irish Literature, Modernism, and the Sea
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Georgetown University
Drawing on recent developments in the study of literature from Ireland to the Indian Ocean, this conversation will consider the implications for Irish literature of reading from the standpoint of the sea, the ocean, and the coast. It will feature experts in Irish literature, modernism, and oceanic studies, and is inspired by the recent publication of Nicholas Allen’s Ireland, Literature, and the Coast: Seatangled (Oxford University Press, 2020)
Reading & Writing
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October 26, 2021
2021-10-26
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Virtual Ballet Technique and Enrichment for Active Seniors
Virtual Ballet Technique and Enrichment for Active Seniors
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San Francisco Ballet
This class is specifically designed for seniors who love fitness and ballet. Classes will offer the benefits of a classical ballet technique class with gentle modifications to honor well-lived backs, hips, knees, and ankles. Once a month, a San Francisco Ballet Audience Engagement Program Expert will “zoom in” with a short in-class experience encompassing dance history, repertory analysis, and other opportunities to learn about the World of Dance and SF Ballet.
Health & Wellness
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October 26, 2021
2021-10-26
|
Live
|
$
12
Read the Revolution Speaker Series with Gordon Wood
Read the Revolution Speaker Series with Gordon Wood
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Museum of the American Revolution
In his latest book, Pulitzer Prize-winning author and New York Times bestseller Dr. Gordon S. Wood distills a lifetime of work on constitutional innovations during the Revolutionary era. Power and Liberty: Constitutionalism in the American Revolution illuminates critical events from the imperial debate in the 1760s that led to the Declaration of Independence, to state constitution-making in 1776 and the creation of the Federal Constitution in 1787. Exploring how Americans have experienced the nature of power, liberty, representation, rights, and other issues, Wood will present debates over the foundational legal and political documents of the United States with timely insights on the Constitution. As the second event in the 2021-2022 Read the Revolution Speaker Series, this program will be held Tuesday, Oct. 26, in the Museum’s Liberty Hall. It also will be broadcast live via Zoom Webinar. Dr. Philip C. Mead, Chief Historian and Curator at the Museum, will join Wood for a seated conversation and live Q&A with the onsite and online audiences.
Reading & Writing
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October 26, 2021
2021-10-26
|
Live
|
$
15
A Wider Type of Freedom: How Struggles for Justice Liberate Everyone
A Wider Type of Freedom: How Struggles for Justice Liberate Everyone
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Yale University
Daniel HoSang, Associate Professor of Ethnicity, Race, and Migration and American Studies at Yale University, in conversation with Matthew Jacobson, co-director of the Public Humanities Program and the Sterling Professor of American Studies, History & African American Studies at Yale. This program is presented as part of the ongoing “Democracy in America” series, a collaboration between the New Haven Free Public Library and Public Humanities at Yale.
Culture & Politics
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October 26, 2021
2021-10-26
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Forms & Features Online Writing Workshop: Monsters
Forms & Features Online Writing Workshop: Monsters
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Poetry Foundation
All are welcome to a poetry discussion and creative writing workshop led by Maggie Queeney. In this session, we read and discuss poems inhabited by monsters in both topic and form. The group will explore a wide variety of poems and conclude with a guided creative writing workshop, where participants will compose poems of their own. Please note: we are offering several sessions of this program. Registration is required; space is limited. To register, email library@poetryfoundation.org with the date and time of the session you would like to attend. This program is for adult participants, aged 18 and older.
Reading & Writing
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October 26, 2021
2021-10-26
|
Live
|
$
FREE
NOVA Universe Revealed Trivia Night
NOVA Universe Revealed Trivia Night
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WGBH Boston
Does your knowledge of the cosmos rival the vastness of space? Put your expertise to the test with an all-things space trivia night to celebrate the premiere of NOVA Universe Revealed. Test your knowledge of the universe with questions surrounding exoplanets, stars, the big bang, and more, for a competition that will truly be out of this world. This virtual event will feature opportunities for competition, both individually or as a team. Watch NOVA Universe Revealed on Wednesday 10/27 at 9/8c on PBS. This event free and available to the public, but you must register access to this event.
Science & Nature
|
October 26, 2021
2021-10-26
|
Live
|
$
FREE
NYPL Live: Reading the City
NYPL Live: Reading the City
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New York Public Library
National Book Award-honored New Yorkers discuss the next chapter for NYC writing, reading, and living, featuring: Taffy Brodesser-Akner (Fleishman Is in Trouble, 2019 Fiction Longlist); Lisa Ko (The Leavers, 2017 Fiction Finalist); Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming, 2014 Young People's Literature Winner); Moderated by Isaac Fitzgerald.
Reading & Writing
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October 26, 2021
2021-10-26
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Seniors Tea with NGV
Seniors Tea with NGV
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National Gallery of Victoria
Discover highlight artworks from the National Gallery of Victoria Collection and enjoy a group conversation in these informal online sessions exploring art together. Like a book club, our hosts will introduce the artwork and lead the group discussion. We look forward to welcoming you and hearing your experiences and perspectives. Please note no prior art knowledge or experience is required.
Art & Music
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October 26, 2021
2021-10-26
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Live At The Hall: John Sebastian
Live At The Hall: John Sebastian
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Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum
John Sebastian is best known as founder, front man, and principal songwriter of the Lovin’ Spoonful, whose 1960s pop hits include “Do You Believe in Magic,” “Daydream,” and “Summer in the City.” Based in Woodstock, New York, Sebastian plays autoharp and several other instruments, frequently combining folk, rock, country, and jug band music. In the Lovin’ Spoonful’s 1966 song “Nashville Cats,” Sebastian extolled the talent of the city’s musicians, and the title became a widely accepted catchphrase for Nashville studio professionals. In 2015, the museum incorporated the song title into the name of its major exhibition, Dylan, Cash, and the Nashville Cats: A New Music City. This year the museum published a version of that exhibit for online audiences, free-to-access here. In this program, Sebastian discusses his career and performs with guitarist Arlen Roth. The duo is set to release the album John Sebastian and Arlen Roth Explore the Spoonful Songbook on October 22.
Art & Music
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October 26, 2021
2021-10-26
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Rachel Kushner in Conversation with Nigel Poor and Earlonne Woods
Rachel Kushner in Conversation with Nigel Poor and Earlonne Woods
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Aperture Foundation
Join Aperture and Crown for a special online event celebrating the recently released titles The San Quentin Project (Aperture, 2021) and This Is Ear Hustle: Unflinching Stories of Everyday Prison Life (Crown, 2021) by Nigel Poor and Earlonne Woods. In this discussion, moderated by Rachel Kushner, Nigel Poor and Earlonne Woods will discuss the importance of storytelling and collaboration in the context of life in prison. When Nigel Poor and Earlonne Woods met, Poor was a photography professor volunteering with the Prison University Project, and Woods was serving thirty-one years to life at California’s San Quentin State Prison. Poor’s teaching work led her to a vast archive filled with photographs taken from life inside the prison that she began using in her classes. The San Quentin Project collects a largely unseen visual record, demonstrating how this archive of the state is now being used to teach visual literacy and process the experiences of incarceration. In 2017, with a shared interest in storytelling, Poor and Woods launched Ear Hustle, the first podcast created and produced in prison that features stories of the daily realities of life inside San Quentin State Prison shared by those living there. This Is Ear Hustle reveals the complexity of life for incarcerated and formerly incarcerated people while illuminating the shared experiences of humanity that unites us all.
Film & Photography
|
October 26, 2021
2021-10-26
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Science in the City: Forensic Report: Case 1886, Death of Dr. Henry Jekyll
Science in the City: Forensic Report: Case 1886, Death of Dr. Henry Jekyll
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Pacific Science Center
It’s the crime of the century! Leading academic Dr. Henry Jekyll’s alter ego is unmasked in this live Science in the City event as the violent criminal Mr. Edward Hyde. In the wake of Jekyll’s death – and with him the demise of the cunning criminal Hyde – a bombshell forensic report reconstructs how Jekyll became Hyde, Hyde’s actions and motives, and how they could have been stopped. Join Kaitlyn Casimo, PhD in her annual celebration of spooky science with PacSci to learn more about the science of Jekyll’s mysterious serum, the motives behind Hyde’s violent behavior, and some of the safety and ethical standards safeguarding modern science. Advance registration required, and a link to the livestream talk will be sent to registrants in advance. We rely on the generous support of the community to produce content such as these virtual events. A suggested donation of $25 will help us ensure that Curiosity Never Closes.
Science & Nature
|
October 26, 2021
2021-10-26
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Marking Time: Indigenous Art from the NGV
Marking Time: Indigenous Art from the NGV
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National Gallery of Victoria
Marking Time: Indigenous Art from the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) looks at the persistence of images, signs or text painted or drawn on a range of surfaces in Indigenous Australia, from ancient times until now. The impulse to draw and make images and symbols is deeply embedded in Indigenous cultures throughout the world and is fundamental to the human experience. One of the first and most prolific forms of mark making, both figurative and non-figurative, has appeared across Australia on rock surfaces since the pre-historic era. Other forms of visual culture are ephemeral and comprise meaningful markings and designs made on the ground, the body and objects, for use in ceremonial contexts. The removal of such ritual markings from the body and the ground after ceremony, along with the loss of other more durable designs and images through natural processes, such as erosion, is compounded by other forms of loss through the socially fragmenting effects of colonisation. In response, Indigenous artists have found new ways of prolonging this visual language of images and signs, by reimagining it in new and more durable art forms, such as acrylic paintings, neons, sculptures and limited-edition prints. This exhibition reveals many nuances of mark making as an artistic practice in the Indigenous Australian context, with multiple aesthetic consequences and modes of practice. Join the museum director for a 5 part video tour through this important exhibition.
Art & Music
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October 27, 2021
2021-10-27
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
Joyce Carol Oates in Conversation
Joyce Carol Oates in Conversation
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Chicago Humanities Festival
In her latest short story collection The (Other) You Joyce Carol Oates ponders who her characters might have become if they’d chosen different paths. Through the imaginations of her contemplative protagonists, Oates—author of contemporary classic novels like We Were the Mulvaneys and Blonde—deftly detangles the complex circumstances that dictate who we turn out to be. Join Oates and Rebecca Makkai, author of Pulitzer Prize finalist The Great Believers, for a discussion of destiny, alternative realities, and our other selves from March, 2021.
Reading & Writing
|
October 27, 2021
2021-10-27
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
Calling BS: The Art of Skepticism in a Data Driven World
Calling BS: The Art of Skepticism in a Data Driven World
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Pacific Science Center
Misinformation, disinformation, and fake news abound and it’s increasingly difficult to know what’s true. Our media environment has become hyperpartisan. Science is conducted by press release. We are fairly well equipped to spot the sort of old-school misinformation that is based in fancy rhetoric and weasel words, but most of us don’t feel qualified to challenge the avalanche of new-school BS presented in the language of math, science, or statistics. Join UW’s Carl Bergstrom, Professor of Biology, and Jevin West, Associate Professor at the Information School and Director of the Center for an Informed Public, as they give us a set of tools to cut through the most intimidating data.
Science & Nature
|
October 27, 2021
2021-10-27
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
Lunch Break Science |Alba García de la Chica
Lunch Break Science |Alba García de la Chica
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The Leakey Foundation
Meet Leakey Foundation grantee Alba García de la Chica and learn about the mechanisms that allow the maintenance of pair bonds and monogamy in owl monkeys. Alba García de la Chica is a PhD candidate from the University of Barcelona. She was awarded a Leakey Foundation Research Grant during our fall 2017 cycle for her project entitled “Behavioral, hormonal and life-history correlates of pair bonding in owl monkeys.”
Science & Nature
|
October 27, 2021
2021-10-27
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
Off the Pedestal: Women Artists in Art Museums
Off the Pedestal: Women Artists in Art Museums
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Nasher Sculpture Center
This panel discussion, from 2017, brings together distinguished and knowledgeable curators, activists, artists and scholars in a discussion exploring the historical lack of representation of women artists in museum collections, especially in the field of sculpture. In a conversation intended to bring broader public awareness to this issue, panelists discuss the variety of factors that contribute to the underrepresentation of women’s works and how museums and collectors might develop more equitable and diverse collections.
Art & Music
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October 27, 2021
2021-10-27
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Fashion, Race and Colour Photography: James Barnor in Conversation
Fashion, Race and Colour Photography: James Barnor in Conversation
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V&A Museum
James Barnor is a leading Ghanaian photographer, with a career spanning six decades and two continents. During 2021, Barnor’s photographs were exhibited across Britain, asserting his significance in the history of the medium. Join James Barnor in a conversation with Dr Christine Checinska, the V&A’s Senior Curator, Africa and Diaspora: Textiles and Fashion and curator of the upcoming exhibition Africa Fashion. They will focus on Barnor's fashion and colour photography, including his pioneering work with colour photography and production in Ghana.
Film & Photography
|
October 27, 2021
2021-10-27
|
Live
|
$
FREE
What Does the Future Hold for Cities, Climate Change, and Migration?
What Does the Future Hold for Cities, Climate Change, and Migration?
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The University of Oxford
55% of the world’s population lives in urban areas. By 2050 this will rise to 70% - almost 2.5 billion people. Nearly one billion of these people live in informal settlements. Cities will also be key in responding to climate change and transformation to sustainable consumption and production. Cities consume close to 2/3 of the world’s energy and account for more than 70% of global greenhouse gas emissions. Almost half a billion urban residents live in coastal areas, increasing their vulnerability even more. So, how can we design and develop cities to be resilient to the effects of climate change? How can we provide for affordable housing and infrastructure, promote sustainable economic development and work towards a zero carbon future? And to add to all this, how can we factor migration into this urban management in the era of climate change? Climate change has rarely, until now, been the sole factor prompting migration, but it most certainly exacerbates it. Yet, there remain gaps in our knowledge and evidence of this. The Oxford Martin Programme on Informal Cities is collecting new and harmonising existing evidence including geospatial data and satellite imagery to study informal neighbourhoods, economies, health and climate change in cities. With diverse expertise in anthropology, geography, mathematics, data science and epidemiology, the team are investigating the migration effects of climate change and the implications for cities, with a specific focus on Addis Ababa and Delhi. This panel discussion will look at these challenges, particularly in times of re-emerging conflicts and the global pandemic and investigate what urgent action can academics, policy-makers and the global community take.
Science & Nature
|
October 27, 2021
2021-10-27
|
Live
|
$
FREE
The Really Popular Bookclub: A Streetcar Named Desire
The Really Popular Bookclub: A Streetcar Named Desire
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The University of Cambridge
The Really Popular Book Club is the reading group hosted by Cambridge University Libraries. Everyone is invited to join us and our special guests to discuss a really popular book, one that we all know and perhaps or perhaps not love. Join us for this club meeting where we will be discussing a play: A Streetcar Named Desire, Tennessee Williams’ steamy modern masterpiece, which has enthralled audiences since its stage premiere in 1947. When fading Southern belle, Blanche DuBois, arrives in New Orleans to stay with her sister Stella, her haughty old-world grandeur and haunted fragility clashes with the virile new-world masculinity of Stella’s immigrant husband, Stanley Kowalski, with disastrous consequences… Our special guest for the evening will be Robyn Winfield-Smith, Artistic Director of Liminal Stage Productions, Associate Learning Practitioner with the Royal Shakespeare Company and ‘Transform’ Clore Fellow 2021. About A Streetcar Named Desire, Robyn says: ‘Smouldering under the lyrical and at times melodramatic surface of Streetcar are so many deep human truths and social complexities: about gender roles and sexual politics; about the triumph of the new industrial age over aristocratic complacency; about hidden trauma and escapist fantasy; about what people will do to survive. Williams’ electrifying play lays layer after layer of human nature bare through its extraordinary sequence of eleven finely-drawn theatrical scenes.’ As well as hearing from Robyn about her thoughts and observations on A Streetcar Named Desire, we will once again be opening the floor up to you, our club members, to share your own observations and remarks. To get you thinking and to help prepare any comments or questions you might want to share, we have prepared three starter questions that you'll find on our registration page.
Reading & Writing
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October 27, 2021
2021-10-27
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Fallen Idols: Alex von Tunzelmann with Paul M. Farber on Toppling Statues
Fallen Idols: Alex von Tunzelmann with Paul M. Farber on Toppling Statues
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New York Public Library
The historian asks whether the people destroying and defacing monuments are erasing history or making it. From the United States to the United Kingdom, to Belgium, New Zealand, and Bangladesh, statues and monuments personifying histories of slavery, colonialism, and genocide are being vandalized and torn down. Robert E. Lee has been graffitied in Virginia, Columbus beheaded in Massachusetts, and King Leopold II set on fire in Antwerp. As these iconic figures fall, the backlash against what's perceived as historical erasure is vigorous and swift, raising the question of whether monuments chart the history they represent, or serve as political statements about the moments in which they were created? Alex von Tunzelmann's Fallen Idols explores the rise and fall of 12 famous and controversial statues around the planet. Paul M. Farber, Director and Co-Founder of Monument Lab, joins Tunzelmann to discuss the book, how societies remember—and confront—the past, and asks whether statues have had their day.
Reading & Writing
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October 27, 2021
2021-10-27
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Courageous Conversations About Race
Courageous Conversations About Race
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Commonwealth Club
For more than 30 years, Glenn Singleton has been helping companies begin a dialogue around race and confront deeply entrenched habits and thought processes. His book Courageous Conversations About Race is a blueprint that gives educators the tools to create equity at their school sites and beyond. During a time in our history when anti-racism is becoming the dominant goal of many organizations and communities; Singleton has been able to amplify lessons that he has been teaching for years as an anti-racism instructor. Why examine and address race? According to Courageous Conversations, race matters in our nation and around the world. Singleton says it is critical that we address racial issues in order to uncover personal and institutional biases that prevent all people, and especially people of color, from reaching their fullest potential. He sees Courageous Conversations as serving as the essential strategy for systems and organizations to address racial disparities through safe, authentic and effective cross-racial dialogue. Creating Citizens will host a discussion between Singleton and Golden State Warriors Chief Operating Officer Brandon Schneider. The Golden State Warriors have been a great example of what happens when an organization takes seriously the lessons learned about addressing racial disparities and making investments into anti-racist work while championing diversity and inclusion.
Culture & Politics
|
October 27, 2021
2021-10-27
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Gillian Laub and Dr. Orna Guralnik on "Family Matters"
Gillian Laub and Dr. Orna Guralnik on "Family Matters"
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The International Center of Photography
Photographer and filmmaker Gillian Laub has spent decades using her camera to explore and investigate regions of political, social and psychological conflict, inviting both her subjects and viewers into the complicated conversations of repair and reconciliation. In 2016, in the midst of the most divisive election in US history, with her family on two sides of the gaping divide, Laub discovered that the discord that historically captivated her was inextricably linked to the complex and loving relationships she had been chronicling in her own family for more than two decades. Held in partnership with Reboot, join ICP for a conversation between Gillian Laub and psychoanalyst Dr. Orna Guralnik, therapist of the Showtime critically acclaimed series "Couples Therapy." They will examine the vulnerability, vitriol, pain, humor and love that Laub explores and shares in her ICP exhibition Family Matters, on view through January 10, 2022, and in her deeply personal monograph Family Matters (Aperture, October 2021.)
Film & Photography
|
October 27, 2021
2021-10-27
|
Live
|
$
5
Pamela Paul in Conversation With Ayad Akhtar
Pamela Paul in Conversation With Ayad Akhtar
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Powell's City of Books
Remember all those ingrained habits, cherished ideas, beloved objects, and stubborn preferences from the pre-Internet age? They’re gone. To some of those things we can say good riddance. But many we miss terribly. Whatever our emotional response to this departed realm, we are faced with the fact that nearly every aspect of modern life now takes place in filtered, isolated corners of cyberspace — a space that has slowly subsumed our physical habitats, replacing or transforming the office, our local library, a favorite bar, the movie theater, and the coffee shop where people met one another’s gaze from across the room. Even as we’ve gained the ability to gather without leaving our house, many of the fundamentally human experiences that have sustained us have disappeared. In 100 glimpses of that pre-Internet world, Pamela Paul, editor of The New York Times Book Review, presents a captivating record, enlivened with illustrations, of the world before cyberspace — from voicemails to blind dates to punctuation to civility. There are the small losses: postcards, the blessings of an adolescence largely spared of documentation, the Rolodex, and the genuine surprises at high school reunions. But there are larger repercussions, too: weaker memories, the inability to entertain oneself, and the utter demolition of privacy. 100 Things We’ve Lost to the Internet (Crown) is at once an evocative swan song for a disappearing era and, perhaps, a guide to reclaiming just a little bit more of the world IRL. Paul will be joined in conversation by Ayad Akhtar, Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright, novelist, and author of Homeland Elegies. This event is presented in partnership with Third Place Books.
Reading & Writing
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October 27, 2021
2021-10-27
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Wednesday Nite @The Lab: Environmental Justice & Sustainable Development
Wednesday Nite @The Lab: Environmental Justice & Sustainable Development
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University of Wisconsin
Experience science as exploring the unknown every week at Wednesday Nite @ The Lab. Discover the latest from UW-Madison researchers as they describe their investigations and inventions that are changing how we look at life and how we lead our lives. Join the discussion as learners of all ages share their ideas and insights during the Q&A, and then chat one-on-one with the speaker during the Linger at the Lectern session. WN@TL runs every Wednesday night, 50 times a year. Our topics cover the full range of science, engineering and technology research at UW-Madison, from astronomy to zoology, and from bioethics to biomedical engineering. This week: From severe weather events to sea level rise, climate change is causing massive disruption around the world. While no nation or community will be spared these adverse consequences, not all nations and communities will experience these adverse consequences equally. Historically marginalized communities, poor people and poor countries will experience these consequences disproportionately, even when their contribution to climate change is relatively small, raising justice concerns. In the meantime, greenhouse gas emissions continue to increase, raising doubts about meeting the global commitment of limiting temperature increase to 1.5 degrees Celsius. In light of the need to take unprecedented, drastic and urgent action, Indigenous leaders recently called upon President Biden to declare a climate emergency.
Science & Nature
|
October 27, 2021
2021-10-27
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Start from Scratch: Write a Story in 6 Weeks
Start from Scratch: Write a Story in 6 Weeks
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San Francisco Writers' Grotto
In this class, we’ll spend six weeks building stories from the foundation. We’ll celebrate the trouble at the heart of good short fiction. We’ll look at ways to get characters in and out of (or deeper into) hot water. We’ll look closely at short stories that achieve unity of purpose, precision of craft, and an emotional wallop. We’ll explore diverse forms and voices and examine not only how each story builds from the first word to the last but how tightly the structure depends upon – and enhances – our understanding of character. During these six weeks, each student will craft a short story from beginning to end, starting with in-class exercises and prompts. Homework will consist of weekly reading assignments as well as student writing. Please be prepared to share your work in class, as we will regularly do so in a supportive, respectful, and constructive manner (with guidelines provided by the instructor). If you’ve written short fiction before, or are looking to start, this class will give you concrete help in developing (or tightening) your craft. Note: this class is generative rather than revision-oriented. While you may already have a draft, please be prepared to write (and share) new material.
Reading & Writing
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October 27, 2021
2021-10-27
|
Live
|
$
595
Getty Talks: Caravaggio: An Overview
Getty Talks: Caravaggio: An Overview
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Getty
Distinguished art historian Michael Fried, professor emeritus of humanities at Johns Hopkins University, takes off from each of the three great paintings that were on loan to the Getty Museum from the Galleria Borghese in Rome to provide an overview of Caravaggio's remarkable, world-transforming achievement.
Art & Music
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October 28, 2021
2021-10-28
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
Atlantic Live: In Pursuit of Happiness
Atlantic Live: In Pursuit of Happiness
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The Atlantic
What does it take to be happy? America’s founding document states that the pursuit of happiness is an unalienable right. But this question has preoccupied philosophers, fascinated scientists, inspired artists, launched an enormous self-help industry—and continues to elude many of us. The Atlantic will host a live event that explores the human hold on happiness—and aims to find ways to build a more meaningful life. The event will consider happiness and relationships; the role of spirituality; how social media and other technology are affecting our happiness; and the ways in which a year of social isolation has reframed our understanding of a lasting sense of joy.
Culture & Politics
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October 28, 2021
2021-10-28
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
NightSchool: Sharks Jaws & Maws
NightSchool: Sharks Jaws & Maws
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California Academy of Sciences
Get a better understanding of shark physiology and peer into some jaws and maws. During this evening highlighting the diversity of sharks, we’re embarking into the wonderful world of filter-feeders, finding out what fossilized shark teeth can tell us about ancient oceans, and getting an up-close look at specimens from the Academy’s scientific collections
Science & Nature
|
October 28, 2021
2021-10-28
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
The Past and Future of Comics
The Past and Future of Comics
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Chicago Humanities Festival
The future of comic books belongs to Black women. In many cases drawing on Afrofuturism to tell their own stories, Black women comic book artists and writers are redefining the genre and innovating new ways to think about identity, race, and gender. Join Black future feminist and pop culture scholar Dr. Grace D. Gipson and Chicago cartoonist Bianca Xunise (Say Her Name) for a conversation about the history and future of comic books in Chicago and the real superheroes of the genre: Black women authors and illustrators, and their protagonists.
Reading & Writing
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October 28, 2021
2021-10-28
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
Collecting Kelp
Collecting Kelp
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Exploratorium
The California coast is a dynamic, active system that supports all sorts of ocean organisms. Dive below the surface at today's online event inspired by the Exploratorium’s once-a-year dry-docking of our data collection buoy and examination of the organisms that have taken residence on its underside over the past year. Featuring: Ocean Record Keepers with Dr. Emily Miller. How can dried seaweed help ocean conservation efforts? Understand the future of the ocean requires an understanding of the past. To date, historical data has been largely limited to instrument records and observations that begin around 1950. Research technician Emily Miller shares how kelp and other marine algae from herbaria repositories, and the female scientists who collected them, are helping extend historical records all the way back to 1878. With this data, Emily offers a new perspective on upwelling cycles and documents these patterns to help understand the shifts in the foundation of the food web of Monterey Bay.
Science & Nature
|
October 28, 2021
2021-10-28
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
Slow Looking
Slow Looking
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Museum of Modern Art
Dance/movement psychotherapist Jennifer Sterling leads this Slow Looking session along with staff in MoMA’s Department of Education. In this 75-minute workshop, explore a photograph by the artist Roy DeCarava through a series of guided activities, including close looking, writing, drawing, and movement. Our intention is to offer a welcoming, calm space for individuals to experience and respond to art together. This session is part of the initiative Artful Practices for Well-Being, which offers ideas for connectedness and healing through art.
Art & Music
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October 28, 2021
2021-10-28
|
Live
|
$
FREE
The Children who Lived in the Gallery
The Children who Lived in the Gallery
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The National Gallery
Although we have all been children, our experiences, and perceptions of this period of our lives are ever-changing and complex. The National Gallery Collection is full of representations of children, enabling us to understand more about society’s perceptions of youth over seven centuries, but it is less known that children used to live in the Gallery itself. In December 1854, Ralph Nicholson Wornum became Keeper of the National Gallery and Secretary to the Board of Trustees. He served in this post for 22 years until his death in 1877. He had 14 children, and they lived in an apartment in the West Wing of the National Gallery.Karen Eslea, the National Gallery’s Head of Learning and National Programmes explores the collection, and the story of the Wornum children, to reflect on childhood and children’s cultural lives, in the past and the present.
Art & Music
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October 28, 2021
2021-10-28
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Día de los Muertos Celebration (Day of the Dead)
Día de los Muertos Celebration (Day of the Dead)
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Smithsonian Institution
In recorded presentations by two renowned Mexican families, the museum showcases two traditions central to Day of the Dead (Día de los Muertos): the art of making figures from sugar and papier-mâché. These two presentations will take place in Spanish. Closed captioning in Spanish and English will be available.
Culture & Politics
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October 28, 2021
2021-10-28
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Art History from Home: Collective Memory in Contemporary Black Art
Art History from Home: Collective Memory in Contemporary Black Art
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Whitney Museum of American Art
This series of online talks asks the Whitney’s Joan Tisch Teaching Fellows to highlight select works in the Museum’s collection to illuminate critical topics in American art from 1900 to the present. During each thirty-minute session, participants are invited to comment and ask questions through a moderated chat for a fifteen-minute Q&A following the talk. Sessions are available live only, but topics and speakers do periodically repeat. Check back here for more sessions added regularly. This session looks at the ways contemporary Black artists draw on collective memory to play with, challenge, and transform notions of identity. We will consider works by Faith Ringgold, Betye Saar, and Kerry James Marshall to explore how these artists subvert the canon of American art and culture.
Art & Music
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October 28, 2021
2021-10-28
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Gaps in Health Equity: Insights from History, Lessons from Covid-19, and Ideas for the Future
Gaps in Health Equity: Insights from History, Lessons from Covid-19, and Ideas for the Future
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Yale University
Unequal access to the Covid-19 vaccine magnifies long-standing gaps in health equity. Will this crisis propel us into a new discussion of health equity, and change our understanding of the global partnerships needed to achieve it? And how can we draw on lessons from the past in order to design a more equitable future? Even in the cases of most urgent need, both healthcare and health outcomes continue to be determined by patterns of global income and wealth. These inequities in preventative care, disease incidence, and treatment options are underscored by historical and structural factors, including histories of colonialism, that heighten the obstacles to achieving health equity. Low-income countries now face not only the challenge of recovering from the effects of Covid-19, but also the long-term consequences of disruption to their already fragile healthcare systems. Is it time to rethink the coordination and collaboration needed to close the health equity gap?
Culture & Politics
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October 28, 2021
2021-10-28
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Minestrone Magic
Minestrone Magic
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US Botanic Garden
The legendary Italian soup minestrone has as many variations as there are cooks. But a few ingredients are essential, and by tradition, come straight from the garden. Join Adrienne as she harvests ingredients from her garden and Danielle as she uses those ingredients to whip up a magical main course soup.
Food & Drink
|
October 28, 2021
2021-10-28
|
Live
|
$
FREE
ndigenous DC: Native Peoples and the Nation’s Capital
ndigenous DC: Native Peoples and the Nation’s Capital
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Brown University
In this talk, Elizabeth Rule, PhD (enrolled citizen, Chickasaw Nation; Assistant Professor of Critical Race, Gender, and Culture Studies at American University) will discuss the historical and contemporary Indigenous presence in Washington, DC. She will showcase her iOS mobile application, the Guide to Indigenous DC, which maps 17 sites of Indigenous importance in the District of Columbia, and preview her forthcoming manuscript, Indigenous DC: Native Peoples and the Nation’s Capital.
Culture & Politics
|
October 28, 2021
2021-10-28
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Bettany Hughes and Irving Finkel discuss 'The First Ghosts'
Bettany Hughes and Irving Finkel discuss 'The First Ghosts'
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The British Museum
To mark Halloween and the publication of Finkel's latest book, The First Ghosts, they consider what was understood by ghosts, the spirits of the dead, especially in ancient Assyria and its region. They explore how a belief in ghosts emerges as a key feature of humanity from its beginning, evident through the earliest writing and archaeology.
Art & Music
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October 28, 2021
2021-10-28
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Bon Appétit: Food on Page and Screen
Bon Appétit: Food on Page and Screen
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NYU School of Professional Studies
From the dietary laws codified in religious scripture to the present-day obsession with competitive cooking shows and mukbang videos on YouTube, it is clear that food has much more than mere biological significance. Sampling an assortment of food-themed literature, film, and TV, we will examine how writers, thinkers, and artists have used food to consider the human experience. Examining key metaphors of taste, hunger, and consumption, we will explore issues including racial, gender, and class inequality; the dangers of industrial meat production; and the political unconscious of food porn. On the menu: snippets from the Bible and the Qur’an; the films Ratatouille and The Lunchbox; writing by Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin, John Lanchester, Ruth Ozeki, and Brian Wood; and the Netflix adaptation of Samurai Gourmet.
Reading & Writing
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October 28, 2021
2021-10-28
|
Live
|
$
399
Justice for Black Farmers: A Conversation to Uproot Racist Policy and Plant Seeds of Redress
Justice for Black Farmers: A Conversation to Uproot Racist Policy and Plant Seeds of Redress
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UC Berkeley
The introduction of the Justice for Black Farmers Act in 2020 and the Emergency Relief for Farmers of Color Act of 2021 was the first time many Americans learned about the historical and ongoing discrimination against farmers of African descent by local farm service agencies and private entities like banks. Yet, it was only the latest chapter in the long saga of anti-Black racism in American farming. Join a panel of legacy farmers, critical race scholars, and a civil rights lawyer to learn about the grave injustices of the 1999 Pigford v. Glickman class action racial discrimination lawsuit, recent actions by the Biden Administration and Congress to rectify these wrongs, and what you can do to support a more fair and democratic farming system in the United States.
Food & Drink
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October 28, 2021
2021-10-28
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Peril to Democracy: Racism and Nationalism in America
Peril to Democracy: Racism and Nationalism in America
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Harvard University
Gather with Harvard and others for the annual Greeley Lecture in Peace and Social Justice. The after effects of the 1/6 Insurrection continue to reverberate across America. Since that fateful and disturbing day, pushbacks against the teaching of race in America, abortion rollbacks, and Covid denialism have swept across the country. What has been the role of evangelical Christianity in fueling these issues? Professor Anthea Butler’s lecture will explore the historical antecedents of Evangelical beliefs and political action leading up to today’s troubling times, and the prospects for the future of religion, peace and political action in America. Anthea Butler is the Geraldine R. Segal Professor in American Social thought and Chair of Religious Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. Butler’s recent book is White Evangelical Racism: The Politics of Morality in America. She is currently President Elect of the American Society of Church History, and is an op-ed contributor to MSNBC Daily. Prof. Butler is also a co-director of the Crossroads Project, funded by the Luce Foundation for the creation of a digital archive for Black Religious life in the United States.
Culture & Politics
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October 28, 2021
2021-10-28
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Boshell Foundation Virtual Lecture: Color in Ancient Mediterranean Sculpture
Boshell Foundation Virtual Lecture: Color in Ancient Mediterranean Sculpture
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Art Institute of Chicago
When first created, ancient Greek, Etruscan, and Roman sculptures did not look the way that we see them in museums today. Their surfaces—now mostly plain marble—were instead enriched by layers of paint. Polychromy, a term derived from the Greek for “many colors,” refers to the application of this paint, which ancient viewers believed enhanced the significance and beauty of the work. Like form, color was one of the most important elements of ancient sculpture. In most cases, only microscopic traces of the ancient paint survive, making it difficult to reconstruct the original appearance of these sculptures. As a result, it is important to separate evidence from speculation in our interpretations of polychromy on ancient sculptures. Thanks to modern technology, research into ancient literary sources, and comparison to works in a variety of media, conservators, scientists, and art historians have been uncovering more of the complexity of painting techniques in ancient art. Beyond attempting to understand ancient color, this research can also enhance our knowledge in other areas, including how ancient Mediterranean peoples represented themselves, their heroes, and their gods through painted sculpture. This program features the insights of Mark Abbe, an expert on ancient polychromy, and curator Katharine Raff and conservation scientist Giovanni Verri, who will reveal findings of their recent research into the polychromy of works in the museum’s collection.
Art & Music
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October 28, 2021
2021-10-28
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Design for All: HOME in the Time of Crisis
Design for All: HOME in the Time of Crisis
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Museum of Design Atlanta
Join MODA’s Executive Director Laura Flusche and renowned architect, activist, and designer Gisue Hariri for an in-depth discussion about the innovative concept and design behind Folding Pods - Hariri & Hariri Architecture’s alternative disaster relief prefabricated structures currently used for displaced people. Due to devastating wars in the Middle East and the refugee crisis, natural disasters and extreme poverty, the total number of homeless worldwide is estimated at over 150 million, with 1.1 billion people living in inadequate housing. Many of these people are forced to live in makeshift camps or sleep on the streets in cities around the world, and many are still living there years or even decades later. Climate change and relentless global tensions suggest these issues will only increase in magnitude; therefore, we must find ways of accommodating global flows of people. The Disaster Relief-Folding Pod is a modest, modular, prefabricated shelter designed with hinged, folded panels to facilitate their shipping and assembly, allowing the pods to be transported to any desired location and then unfolded on site. In its folded-flat configuration, the lightweight Pod fits on a flatbed truck for transportation to any desired location. A solar-powered portable generator will unfold these prefabricated pods. With a push of a button in less than 5 minutes, the pod unfolds into a safe home.
Culture & Politics
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October 28, 2021
2021-10-28
|
Live
|
$
5
Art Making | Drawing from the Collections: Exploring Color in Pastel
Art Making | Drawing from the Collections: Exploring Color in Pastel
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Princeton University
The Art Museum is partnering with the Arts Council of Princeton to provide free online pastel drawing classes. Weekly classes are taught by artist-instructor Barbara DiLorenzo over Zoom. With an emphasis on using soft pastels to blend and create rich colors, each week’s lesson will be inspired by works in the Museum’s collections. This live art-making class is inspired by Sol LeWitt’s Wall Drawing #1134, Whirls and Twirls (Princeton). As you pass through the Bloomberg Arch of Bloomberg Hall, be sure to look up: there you’ll find Sol LeWitt’s vivid painting. In the late 1960s, LeWitt pioneered a new way of working: inspired by the tradition of mural painting, he began to create drawings and paintings for walls, all of them abstract. They combine a variety of relatively simple marks and geometric motifs to create aesthetic effects that are both dynamic and beautiful. Whirls and Twirls is especially playful for LeWitt, and its interlocking bands of color, which form a larger series of interconnected shapes, suggest exchange, movement, traffic, and the transmission of energy. In this class we will focus on color harmony using an abstract structure of crisscrossing and swirling lines on a page—filling each shape with specific hues.
Art & Music
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October 28, 2021
2021-10-28
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Jessie Daniels in Conversation with Lyz Lenz
Jessie Daniels in Conversation with Lyz Lenz
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Prairie Lights Books
Please join us for a reading and conversation with Jessie Daniels to celebrate the release of her book Nice White Ladies: The Truth about White Supremacy, Our Role in It, and How We Can Dismantle It. She will be joined in conversation by Lyz Lenz. Kirkus Reviews calls the book, "An immensely readable examination of White women’s prominent role in the endurance of systematic racism... the author uses a wide array of examples of “nice white ladies” both on the right and the left… [she] also discusses the tragic suicide of her mother, who, despite relative privilege, was “taught to be nice above all else”—like many White women. Daniels, who has clearly done the work of examining herself first, concludes by offering constructive ways White women can undo the damage of their privileged status.” Jessie Daniels is the author of White Lies and a Faculty Affiliate at the Harvard Berkman Klein Center for Internet, a research associate at the Oxford Internet Institute, and Professor at Hunter College and The Graduate Center, CUNY, in Sociology, Critical Social Psychology, and Africana Studies. Jessie is an internationally recognized expert on Internet manifestations of racism and her writing on race has appeared in the New York Times, NPR, Forbes, and Newsweek. She lives in New York City.
Reading & Writing
|
October 28, 2021
2021-10-28
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Artist Talk: Emory Douglas
Artist Talk: Emory Douglas
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San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
Don’t miss this special opportunity to hear artist and social justice leader Emory Douglas discuss his remarkable body of work in a talk co-hosted by SFMOMA and City College of San Francisco. In dialogue with educator, scholar, and performer Aliyah Dunn-Salahuddin, Douglas will dive into the history, techniques, and concepts of his revolutionary illustration and design work for The Black Panther and Sun-Reporter newspapers and discuss his recent SFMOMA mural commission, REPARATIONS (2007/2021), currently on view on Floor 2. This event is hosted by SFMOMA in partnership with City College of San Francisco. Live captioning will be provided for this program.
Art & Music
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October 28, 2021
2021-10-28
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Pierogi
Pierogi
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18 Reasons
Pierogi are a Central and Eastern European dumpling and a comfort food well suited to the first days of Autumn. Gracie will teach you two savory varieties: a classic potato and dill filling and a winter squash and caraway pierogi. Topped with sour cream and caramelized onions, these little pockets of joy are deeply satisfying, easy to make and freeze incredibly well! Menu for this class includes: Classic Potato and Dill Pierogi; Winter Squash and Caraway Pierogi; and Caramelized Onions and Sour Cream to garnish.
Food & Drink
|
October 28, 2021
2021-10-28
|
Live
|
$
50
David Hartt: UCLA Department of Art Lecture
David Hartt: UCLA Department of Art Lecture
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The Hammer Museum at UCLA
David Hartt discusses his wide-ranging practice in this online artist talk. He is joined by Aram Moshayedi, Robert Soros Curator, who organized the artist’s current Hammer Projects installation. Hartt lives and works in Philadelphia, where he is associate professor in the Department of Fine Arts at the University of Pennsylvania. Hartt's recent solo exhibitions include My Building, Your Design: Seven Portraits by David Hartt, Art Institute of Chicago (2018); in the forest, Graham Foundation, Chicago (2017); and Interval, LAXART, Los Angeles (2015). His work has been included in such group exhibitions as Ocean of Images: New Photography 2015, Museum of Modern Art, New York; America Is Hard to See, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015); and Shine a Light: Canadian Biennial 2014, National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa. Hartt is the recipient of a 2015 Foundation for Contemporary Arts Grant. In 2012 he was named a United States Artists Cruz Fellow, and in 2011 he received a Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Award.
Art & Music
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October 28, 2021
2021-10-28
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Artists on Artworks: Jordan Casteel on Gerhard Richter
Artists on Artworks: Jordan Casteel on Gerhard Richter
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The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Painter Jordan Casteel reflects on works in the current Met exhibition Gerhard Richter: Painting After All, considering figuration and the role of photography in her own practice. Recorded in May, 2020. this event also provides access to a virtual tour of the Met's exhibit.
Art & Music
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October 29, 2021
2021-10-29
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On-Demand
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$
FREE
NightSchool: Color of Life
NightSchool: Color of Life
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California Academy of Sciences
Sure, colorful animals are beautiful, but in the natural world, color is way more than just an aesthetic. Learn how color is created and plays a crucial role in the day-to-day life—and survival—of countless species from scientists who study birds, frogs, and butterfly wings. It’s easy to identify butterflies by their wing colors and patterns, but how are these intricate designs formed? Erick Bayala, PhD student at the University of Chicago, studies the role of genes in determining these patterns: when and where they’re expressed and how they get translated into the stunning colors you see in adult butterflies. The Gouldian finch of Northern Australia is an amazingly colorful bird, with wild populations made up of individuals with either a red or black head. Hear from Dr. Simon Griffith of Macquarie University on how these birds differ from each other beyond their color and how that’s provided insight into their persistence over evolutionary time. The strawberry poison dart frog found in Panama’s Bocas del Toro Archipelago displays some of the natural world’s most brilliant and variable skin colors. Dr. Yusan Yang, postdoctoral researcher at Washington University in St. Louis, talks about the various functions of their colors, from warning potential predators of toxins and fighting off rivals to finding a suitable mate.
Science & Nature
|
October 29, 2021
2021-10-29
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
Lunch Break Science: Habiba Chirchir
Lunch Break Science: Habiba Chirchir
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The Leakey Foundation
Meet Leakey Foundation scientist Habiba Chirchir and learn what changes in the skeletal anatomy of our ancestors tell us about their behavior. Habiba Chirchir is a biological anthropologist. Her research focuses on understanding the relationship between changes in skeletal anatomy and behavior by investigating trabecular and cortical bone. She conducts comparative analyses of anatomical features in fossil hominins, modern humans, other primates and non-primate mammals. She uses CT and X-ray imaging in her research. Habiba earned a BA from the University of Nairobi, an MA from New York University and PhD from George Washington University. Habiba’s work mostly involves data collection in museum laboratories. She has also participated in paleoanthropological fieldwork in East Africa and the UK. Habiba continues to investigate differences in bone density patterns in limb joints of a diverse group of mammals; research she started as a Peter Buck postdoctoral fellow in our program. Apart from research, Habiba teaches courses on Human Anatomy and Human Biology in the Department of Biological Sciences at Marshall University. She also is involved in student mentorship in her lab.
Science & Nature
|
October 29, 2021
2021-10-29
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
After Dark Online: Toward a Holographic Panoptics of the Mind
After Dark Online: Toward a Holographic Panoptics of the Mind
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Exploratorium
Welcome to Aperture Lucida, the latest creation of the young Southern California artist and inventor Tristan Duke, product of over two years’ work as artist in residence alongside fellow materials wizards at the Exploratorium. The piece veritably brims with surprising implications, which Lawrence Weschler, the author of Mr. Wilson’s Cabinet of Wonder, will assist Mr. Duke in teasing out. Tristan Duke was in conversation with writer Lawrence Weschler around Duke’s new work, Aperture Lucida, in June, 2021.
Science & Nature
|
October 29, 2021
2021-10-29
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
Meditation and Mindfulness
Meditation and Mindfulness
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Smithsonian Institution
Meditation helps us build a relationship to a place of inner quietude. To contribute to a sense of calm in this uncertain time, we are offering free 30-minute online meditations three times each week led by DC-based meditation teachers. These free sessions are appropriate for all levels of practitioners and include a variety of mindfulness practices. All are welcome! No previous experience is required. Meet our meditation teachers: Aparna Sadananda and Philip Bender
Health & Wellness
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October 29, 2021
2021-10-29
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Treasures from the Permanent Collection: Frankenstein - Creator, Creature, Monster
Treasures from the Permanent Collection: Frankenstein - Creator, Creature, Monster
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The Morgan Library & Museum
From the Morgan’s three Gutenberg Bibles to the intricately carved cylinder seals of Ancient Mesopotamia, join our Morgan docents as they guide you on an up-close virtual exploration and discussion of one of the many works in the institution’s treasured permanent collection. For this Halloween session, we spotlight Frankenstein: Creator, Creature, Monster. Please note that the program will take place online. After registering, participants will receive a confirmation email with instructions on how to participate using Zoom. We ask that you download the app in advance for the best user experience.
Art & Music
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October 29, 2021
2021-10-29
|
Live
|
$
FREE
The Art of Looking: Brujas à volar (Witches Preparing to Fly)
The Art of Looking: Brujas à volar (Witches Preparing to Fly)
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National Gallery of Art
In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month and in the spirit of Halloween, Francisco de Goya's Brujas à volar (Witches Preparing to Fly) is the inspiration for this interactive conversation. Join us and share your observations, interpretations, questions, and ideas, and build on your own first impressions to broaden your understanding of this work of art. This session lasts one hour and is completely interactive. National Gallery educators will facilitate the conversation to create an environment for shared learning. These conversations will encourage you to engage deeply with art, with others, and with the world around you as you hone skills in visual literacy and perspective-taking. This program is free and open to the public and is designed for anyone interested in talking about art. No art or art history background is required. Ages 18 and over. Due to the interactive nature of this program, sessions are not recorded.
Art & Music
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October 29, 2021
2021-10-29
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Earth Day Now More Than Ever: Into Nature and Toward Life
Earth Day Now More Than Ever: Into Nature and Toward Life
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Pacific Science Center
In July 1969, a handful of earthlings rocketed beyond the warm embrace of our atmosphere and ventured across the surface of the moon. Two months later, here in Seattle, Senator Gaylord Nelson announced plans for an Earth Day event–it took off. In the 50 years since, our technological systems have grown exponentially, and our relationship with the Earth has dwindled. While observing the “Stay Home, Stay Healthy” order during Earth Day 2020, we’re joined by Dr. Peter Kahn, UW Professor in the Department of Psychology and School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, Director of the HINTS Laboratory, and Editor-in-Chief of the academic journal Ecopsychology. Don’t worry, this Earth Day talk isn’t doom-and-gloom or a history lesson! Dr. Kahn shows how, even in the city, we can deepen our interactions with the natural world, Earth’s heartbeat. He’ll share his lab’s studies on people interacting with technological nature and he’ll talk about a new urban design methodology–Interaction Pattern Design–through which we can rewild our lives.
Science & Nature
|
October 30, 2021
2021-10-30
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
Virtual Yoga from the Garden
Virtual Yoga from the Garden
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US Botanic Garden
Join WithLoveDC as they continue the USBG’s weekly community yoga class. Typically offered on-site at the USBG Conservatory or outdoor gardens, the Garden is supporting an online yoga class to continue the program for community health and well-being. During this online class, an instructor from WithLoveDC will guide you through a one-hour meditation and yoga practice via this link. Space is still first-come, first-serve, only the first 500 yogis to log in will be able to practice! Grab a mat and a quiet space. Make sure you have a water bottle close by and maybe light a candle and turn off the lights. Perhaps open the window or practice outside on your porch. We hope that by sharing this practice, separate but together, we can see still feel the love and support of this greater community in this time of uncertainty.
Health & Wellness
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October 30, 2021
2021-10-30
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Autumn Galettes: Sweet & Savory
Autumn Galettes: Sweet & Savory
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18 Reasons
Pie crusts can be intimidating. The threat of mushy, under-cooked undersides and the fear of rolling out concentric dough has kept many people from trying their hand at this pastry classic. Enter the galette. Galettes have all the flavor of pies but are far more low key. No blind baking and no tedious crust crimping. They are the pastry equivalent of the dinner guest who always knows what to say and gets along with everyone. In this autumn edition of our popular class with Marie, both galettes feature tantalizing flavor pairings that elevate the final products to be more than the sum of their parts. We will be combining tangy tomatillos with sassy chilies and savory cotija as well as fresh, fleeting figs with nuanced goat’s chevre. Your palate is in for a treat. Join us as we learn how to make beautiful and flaky crusts while saluting the season with fillings that feature the produce of autumn. Menu for this class includes: Basic Galette Dough; Roasted Tomatillo, Chile & Cotija Galette; Fig, Mint & Honey Chevre Galette.
Food & Drink
|
October 30, 2021
2021-10-30
|
Live
|
$
50
Creative Writing for Beginners: A Saturday Workshop
Creative Writing for Beginners: A Saturday Workshop
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NYU School of Professional Studies
Boost your creativity with an afternoon of cutting-edge exercises while identifying your next steps as a writer. Learn right-brain techniques for effortlessly accessing creative flow and generating new material. And in a final practice, gain direction about how to nurture your writer self and continue to develop what you start in this workshop. It is primarily spent writing, with some focused sharing in small groups and full-class discussions mixed in. This class is for aspiring writers in all genres (including fiction, nonfiction, comedy, poetry, personal essays, songwriting, and screenwriting) who want to have fun, try something new, enhance their skills, and take home fresh material.
Reading & Writing
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October 30, 2021
2021-10-30
|
Live
|
$
219
Virtual Sea Otter Encounter
Virtual Sea Otter Encounter
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Shedd Aquarium
Meet the sea otters at Shedd Aquarium—virtually! In our new Virtual Sea Otter Encounter, come face-to-face with the playful, adorable sea otters that call Shedd home. This experience is all about getting up close—join us behind the scenes for a sea otter play session, watch them dive, socialize, vocalize and groom and find out how their sustainable, restaurant-quality food prep happens. Will you play with pups Cooper and Watson? Watch Yaku’s pocket in action? Visit Luna while she snacks on sea urchins? Dive in and explore the world of sea otters firsthand! Each up-close visit will be unique, and we are not able to guarantee any specific sea otters during an experience. This 35–40 minute virtual encounter will take place on Zoom so you can enjoy the experience from your own home anywhere in the world. All questions can be asked live through the chat function and responded to by our program host.
Science & Nature
|
October 30, 2021
2021-10-30
|
Live
|
$
49.95
Big Night at the Museum
Big Night at the Museum
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Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum
There has never been a night like BIG NIGHT (At the Museum). Troubled times often bring out the best in us all, and these times have called for the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum to remove some of its most treasured instruments from their cases, and place them in the hands of modern masters for an unprecedented night of music. In this on-demand opportunity, you can enjoy the live broadcast from the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum in Nashville where some of country's greatest current stars were able to play on the Museum's historic instruments, for one night only.
Art & Music
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October 31, 2021
2021-10-31
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On-Demand
|
$
FREE
David Park: 7x7 - Seven Special Guests, Seven Minutes Each
David Park: 7x7 - Seven Special Guests, Seven Minutes Each
-
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
In this online program, our seven distinguished guests have the (virtual) floor for seven minutes each to reflect on a work by the late David Park (1911–1960), best known as the originator of Bay Area Figurative Art. Speakers include: Helen Park Bigelow, daughter of David Park; author of the memoir “David Park, Painter: Nothing Held Back"; Nancy Boas, author of the biography “David Park: A Painter’s Life”; Gretchen Diebenkorn Grant, daughter of artist Richard Diebenkorn; Corey Keller, curator of photography, SFMOMA; exhibition catalogue contributor; Francis Mill, artist; gallerist at Hackett Mill, representing the estate of David Park; Belinda Tate, executive director, Kalamazoo Institute of the Arts; Wayne Thiebaud, artist; and Janet Bishop (moderator), Thomas Weisel Family Chief Curator and Curator of Painting and Sculpture, SFMOMA; lead curator of “David Park: A Retrospective."
Art & Music
|
October 31, 2021
2021-10-31
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
Beginner's Acting Lab
Beginner's Acting Lab
-
Atlantic Theater Company
This six week lab is an excellent start or refresher for the beginner adult actor. Explore acting exercises and techniques to develop your basic understanding of how to deliver a compelling and truthful performance. Students will be introduced to fundamentals of the Atlantic Technique through the exploration of scenes and monologues. Improve your communication, public speaking, and presentation skills. No prior experience is necessary.
Art & Music
|
October 31, 2021
2021-10-31
|
Live
|
$
295
Exceptional Essentials: Fall Squash
Exceptional Essentials: Fall Squash
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18 Reasons
Come from anywhere in the world and join Chef Mike and 18 Reasons as we welcome in the Autumn harvest with a class dedicated to squashes. We will spend the hours before sunset on All Hallows' Eve learning how to safely handle those brightly colored and hard-skinned gourds that fill our produce stands, turning them into amazingly tender and sweet vegetable treats. To begin, we will grab some cute acorn squash, carefully cut them in half, and stuff them with an exotic mix of lamb, feta cheese, mint and pomegranate. Then a classic butternut squash risotto, with three times the ordinary approach to butternut – resulting in a vibrant display of Fall orange, deep sweetness sparked by nutty Parmesan cheese and crispy sage leaves. No tricks this Halloween, just a pair of golden and yummy Treats! The menu for this class includes: Baked Acorn Squash with Lamb, Pistachio, Couscous, Feta, Mint, and Pomegranate Stuffing (Vegetarian alternative available with Sauteed Mushrooms); and Ultimate Triple Butternut Squash Risotto with Fried Sage.
Food & Drink
|
October 31, 2021
2021-10-31
|
Live
|
$
50
Community and Justice: Urban Conservation and Human Wildlife Coexistence
Community and Justice: Urban Conservation and Human Wildlife Coexistence
-
Pacific Science Center
Wildlife is finding remarkable ways to persist in cities, redefining what we consider to be nature. They also teach us how the infrastructure we build for ourselves forge an environment for innovation. Urban Ecologist Dr. Chris Schell discusses the patterns and processes by which wildlife are adapting to cities. Learn how carnivores like coyotes and raccoons have become sentinels of urban environments, helping reframe how we consider our cities as viable greenspaces, and come together as a community around their amazing stories. Their narratives provide another lens on how we can be effective environmental stewards through activism and social justice that dismantles structural racism and classism.
Science & Nature
|
November 1, 2021
2021-11-01
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
Classical Mythology
Classical Mythology
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NYU School of Professional Studies
This class introduces the myths of Ancient Greece and Rome, examining the ways that myths were taken up, reimagined, and repurposed in Greek and Latin literature. Each of our five sessions will cover a different classical author- Homer, Sappho, Lucretius, Vergil, and Ovid- from whom we’ll read small selections in translation. By the end of the course, you will be familiar with some of the core mythic traditions in the Greco-Roman world as well as the ways that myths were understood, adapted, and challenged over time. We will consider some of the different definitions of classical myth, the relationship between myth and religion in antiquity, critiques of traditional mythology levied by philosophers and other sceptics, and the ways in which myths were often co-opted for political and ideological purposes. This course is appropriate for those who are new to classical mythology as well as those with some prior knowledge of the classical world.
Reading & Writing
|
November 1, 2021
2021-11-01
|
Live
|
$
359
Conversations @Graham: Saints and Sinners
Conversations @Graham: Saints and Sinners
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University of Chicago Graham School
Join us for a conversation with University of Chicago Associate Professor Richard Payne exploring the saints and sinners who influenced Christianity in the Middle East. Together, we will explore the dialectical relationship of these two groups through texts from the Middle East, the Roman and Iranian empires, and the kingdoms of the Caucasus, Central Asia, and Ethiopia.
Culture & Politics
|
November 1, 2021
2021-11-01
|
Live
|
$
FREE
The Camera Sees What You Want It to See: Race, Religion, and Hollywood Film
The Camera Sees What You Want It to See: Race, Religion, and Hollywood Film
-
The University of Oxford
Each term, the Centre hosts a series of public lectures featuring distinguished speakers from academia, church and faith communities, politics and public life, and the arts, who address significant issues in the intersection of faith and culture. This talk is the fourth in the autumn term series.
Culture & Politics
|
November 1, 2021
2021-11-01
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Sebastian Junger: Freedom
Sebastian Junger: Freedom
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Commonwealth Club
Sebastian Junger returns, in person (also streaming virtually) to The Commonwealth Club to discuss the ideas in his latest book, Freedom. Throughout history, he says, humans have been driven by the quest for two cherished ideals: community and freedom. The two don’t coexist easily. We value individuality and self-reliance, yet are utterly dependent on community for our most basic needs. Junger examines that tension—which lies at the heart of what it means to be human. For much of a year, Junger and three friends—a conflict photographer and two Afghan War vets—walked the railroad lines of the East Coast. It was an experiment in personal autonomy, but also in interdependence. Dodging railroad cops, sleeping under bridges, cooking over fires, and drinking from creeks and rivers, the four men forged a unique reliance on one another. Junger weaves his account of this journey together with related digressions on primatology and boxing strategy, the history of labor strikes and Apache raiders, the role of women in resistance movements, and the brutal reality of life on the Pennsylvania frontier. Written in exquisite, razor-sharp prose, Freedom is a nuanced examination of the primary desire that defines us.
Reading & Writing
|
November 1, 2021
2021-11-01
|
Live
|
$
5
The New Deal and the Supreme Court: Law, Politics and Packing the Court
The New Deal and the Supreme Court: Law, Politics and Packing the Court
-
Johns Hopkins University
This course discusses the dramatic conflict between the Supreme Court and the New Deal. The history of the Supreme Court’s hostility to social and economic reforms, the conflict with the New Deal, and the court packing crisis is also examined. Schedule: Session 1 The development of classical legal thought and the Court’s hostility to social reform, the coming of the Great Depression, and the eve of the New Deal. Session 2 The Supreme Court, its opposition to New Deal reforms, and the election of 1936. Session 3 The court packing proposal and the campaigns, for and against. This class will include a reenactment of portions of the Congressional testimony on the bill. Session 4 The Constitutional Revolution of 1937, the switch in time that saved nine, remaking the Supreme Court and aftermath. Objective: The participants will come away with a greater understanding of a pivotal moment in American political and constitutional history, and sense of the complex interplay between politics, policy and the law.
Culture & Politics
|
November 1, 2021
2021-11-01
|
Live
|
$
120
David Rubin: Empathy and Inclusivity in the Public Realm
David Rubin: Empathy and Inclusivity in the Public Realm
-
New York Botanical Garden
Known for his design talent and advocacy for social justice within urban spaces, David Rubin will share his concern that the connective tissue of our cities-the “third spaces” between work and home-are not truly public or reflective of the general population. His work reflects his belief that “accessibility begins with the invitation to participate.” In this presentation, Rubin will illustrate how his designs explore issues of identity and accessibility with a focus on Franklin Park and the National World War I Memorial in Washington, D.C., as well as Eskenazi Health Hospital and the Cummins Distribution Headquarters in Indianapolis.
Culture & Politics
|
November 1, 2021
2021-11-01
|
Live
|
$
18
Write Gripping Stories
Write Gripping Stories
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San Francisco Writers' Grotto
To be human is to want. And the more the characters we create want things and struggle to achieve those goals, the more emotionally satisfying our stories will be for our readers and audiences. In this class, we will start by considering the following questions: What is it that makes a book so compelling you can’t put it down? Why are characters like Michael Corleone, Lady Macbeth, and Katniss Everdeen (to name just a few) seared into our memories? How can we apply that same narrative urgency to our own novels, memoirs, and scripts? We will answer these questions by looking at the craft of story structure. Using examples from literature, film, and television—as well as a case study in story construction—we will explore how a richly drawn character collides with competing wants, obstacles, and his or her own flaws to make for an irresistible, emotionally resonant narrative. You will then use various story and character discovery exercises to learn as much as you can about your characters and their world, presenting what you know of your story to the class. In a workshop setting, the class will then discuss your story from the standpoint of narrative craft, helping you create a more complete story arc.
Reading & Writing
|
November 1, 2021
2021-11-01
|
Live
|
$
350
What Are You Smoking? Demystifying Cannabis Regulation and Testing
What Are You Smoking? Demystifying Cannabis Regulation and Testing
-
Pacific Science Center
One industry deemed essential during the COVID-19 pandemic are cannabis retailers. Research shows that over 15% of adults in Washington state consume cannabis and cannabis consumers now outnumber nicotine consumers. However, keeping up with this dynamic industry can be daunting as regulations and requirements continue to change. Hear from Nick Mosely, Chief Executive Officer and Dr. Tania Sasaki, Chief Science Officer of Confidence Analytics, an accredited cannabis testing laboratory in Washington State, as they discuss the historical and current regulatory landscape of cannabis legalization. Laboratory testing will also be explained, including state requirements, how testing is performed, how to interpret test results, and what customers should consider when purchasing cannabis products.
Science & Nature
|
November 2, 2021
2021-11-02
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
NightSchool: Nature is Nurture
NightSchool: Nature is Nurture
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California Academy of Sciences
How does nature nurture human health? Join scientists as they share the surprising ways poison birds and biodiversity can impact medicine and public health.
Science & Nature
|
November 2, 2021
2021-11-02
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
After Dark Online: Racism in Science
After Dark Online: Racism in Science
-
Exploratorium
Science isn’t neutral. Science is carried out by people, and can be shaped by their beliefs, social values, blind spots, and biases—and while it can reveal the impacts of racism, science is also historically and currently embedded with racist and inequitable practices. As concerns such as racialized bioethics and data privacy continue to emerge in tandem with scientific progress, we examine where racism has been built into the sciences and how the scientific process can perpetuate racist points of view.
Science & Nature
|
November 2, 2021
2021-11-02
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
The Nature of Oaks
The Nature of Oaks
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New York Botanical Garden
Oaks support more species of life than any other tree genus in North America, sustaining everything from acorn-collecting woodpeckers to caterpillars that dazzle like jewels. In his latest book, The Nature of Oaks, award-winning author Doug Tallamy shares insights from his study of these superior trees and details how and why they do more than other shade trees to support animal diversity, protect watersheds, and sequester carbon dioxide. Join us as we explore how returning more of these essential trees to green spaces will help restore ecological integrity to our human-dominated landscapes.
Science & Nature
|
November 2, 2021
2021-11-02
|
Live
|
$
18
Bangladesh at 50: Exploring Place and Identity in the Bangladeshi Diaspora
Bangladesh at 50: Exploring Place and Identity in the Bangladeshi Diaspora
-
Royal Ontario Museum
Explore the important role played by evolving ideas of home and community within the Bangladeshi diaspora in Toronto and London, UK, as global communities mark the 50th anniversary of Bangladeshi Independence. Hosted by Friends of South Asia's Nitin Deckha, this conversation with community and cultural leaders showcases the importance of culture, oral history and identity in building thriving Banglatowns that are reimagining neighbourhoods along Toronto's Danforth Avenue and in London's East End.
Culture & Politics
|
November 2, 2021
2021-11-02
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Art Talk Live: Zelda Fitzgerald, Girl Mystary
Art Talk Live: Zelda Fitzgerald, Girl Mystary
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Harvard Art Museums
A close look at a group of bold watercolors by Zelda Fitzgerald confirms her originality, talent, and wit as an artist. Known to her contemporaries as F. Scott Fitzgerald’s temperamental wife, Zelda was a creative force in her own right. Art Talks Live are presented via Zoom every other Tuesday at 12:30pm (ET) and offer an up-close look at works from our collections with our team of curators, conservators, fellows, and graduate students.
Art & Music
|
November 2, 2021
2021-11-02
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Marine Mammal Identification Masterclass
Marine Mammal Identification Masterclass
-
California Academy of Sciences
From mighty whales to acrobatic dolphins to frolicking sea otters, marine mammals are a diverse, charismatic group of animals—and vital components of healthy ocean ecosystems. In this free, three-part virtual masterclass led by Academy scientists, learn how to identify the marine mammals you might see cruising the California coast or stranded on shore. While not required, it's a good idea to attend all three sessions in order since each class builds upon the previous one.
Science & Nature
|
November 2, 2021
2021-11-02
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Art History Course: Making Sense of Jasper Johns
Art History Course: Making Sense of Jasper Johns
-
Whitney Museum of American Art
In a 1962 review of Jasper Johns’s work, critic Leo Steinberg repeatedly asked “Does it mean anything?” Across his almost seventy-year career, Johns’s work in painting, sculpture, and assemblage has often overwhelmed and confounded critics. His work seems to resist interpretation because his references are either too literal, overly personal, or simply rendered opaque. Yet his celebrated legacy has also pressed critics, artists, and viewers alike to imagine artwork’s meaning and value differently. In this way, Johns’s art resonates with contemporary works that make us question and reframe taken-for-granted elements of our everyday life. This course—held in conjunction with Jasper Johns: Mind/Mirror—gives participants a comprehensive look at Johns’s career, while placing his work in conversation with contemporary artists who are both indebted to and building upon Johns’s ongoing legacy. Tuesdays, November 2, 9, and 16, 3 pm ET. This course is free, but advance registration is required.
Art & Music
|
November 2, 2021
2021-11-02
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Speaking with Whales: Listening to and Translating Their Communication
Speaking with Whales: Listening to and Translating Their Communication
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Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard
2017–2018 Radcliffe fellows David Gruber, Michael Bronstein, and Shafi Goldwasser convened in 2019 an exploratory seminar at Harvard Radcliffe Institute titled “Novel Ways to Non-invasively Visualize/Characterize/ Decipher the Sonic Communication of Marine Mammals.” From this, the group was awarded the 2020 Audacious Project and formed Project CETI (Cetacean Translation Initiative) with the mission to study communication among highly intelligent sperm whales to understand the species on a new level. Using state-of-the-art non-invasive robotics to capture sounds and apply advanced machine learning to decode recordings, researchers now have the tools to look for deep structure in whales’ communication systems.
Science & Nature
|
November 2, 2021
2021-11-02
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Online Course: Close up on Kandisnsky
Online Course: Close up on Kandisnsky
-
Guggenheim Museums
This series of art-making workshops led by artist and educator Stina Puotinen is designed to connect participants with their creativity while engaging with the Guggenheim’s exhibition Vasily Kandinsky: Around the Circle. Through conversation and observation, this four-part class will explore the life and work of Vasily Kandinsky. A highlight of the Guggenheim’s collection, Kandinsky’s work investigates spirituality, music, and emotion through color and abstract forms. Using playful prompts, class participants will use painting, drawing, and collage to discover Kandinsky’s process and inspiration. Participants will experiment with aspects of Kandinsky’s practice through a variety of hands-on art-making both during and between classes—“homework” optional! All course sessions will be led virtually through Zoom. A Zoom link and password will be emailed ahead of the course. All times listed in Eastern Time (ET). Class schedule: November 2: Color and Feeling; November 9: Shape and Spirituality; November 16: Sound and Music; November 23: Form and Symbolism.
Art & Music
|
November 2, 2021
2021-11-02
|
Live
|
$
160
Marin Alsop in Conversation with Oskar Eustis
Marin Alsop in Conversation with Oskar Eustis
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Aspen Institute
Join the Aspen Institute’s Conversations with Great Leaders Series, in memory of Preston Robert Tisch, for a livestreamed discussion featuring Marin Alsop, conductor and 2021/22 Harman/Eisner Artist in Residence, in conversation with Oskar Eustis, artistic director of The Public Theater and 2020/21 Harman/Eisner Artist in Residence.
Art & Music
|
November 2, 2021
2021-11-02
|
Live
|
$
FREE
New York City: Form & Function — Skyline, Street, Apartment, Office
New York City: Form & Function — Skyline, Street, Apartment, Office
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92nd Street Y
Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, author and esteemed New York magazine architecture critic Justin Davidson leads this four-part course exploring four iconic elements that define — and continue to redefine — New York City. The course focuses on the interrelationship between skyline, street, apartment and office, as Davidson looks at these core components of NYC’s urban innovation, presenting them as a prism through which to examine the city’s unique synergy between design, technology, economics and social mores. During the first decades of the early 20th century, urban life in New York City was transformed. The advent of the typewriter and birth of the high-rise office building fueled white-collar work. The apartment building became the essential New York habitat. The construction of the subway and regional rail allowed people to live farther from their workplaces, extending the metropolis outward as well as upward. And it could all be seen in the skyline. Now a century later, we find ourselves looking at these aspects of urban life with fresh eyes. The pandemic has focused debates on how we use and design our streets. And as apartments become workplaces and offices lie vacant, the relationship between life and work is being reimagined in ways that will impact the city for decades to come. Davidson looks at the historic shape, function and character of these four elements of NYC, then shifts his examination to the modern day and this watershed moment in possibilities for urban transformation. Students will come away from this course with a deeper understanding of these essential elements and how they profoundly shape — and have been shaped by — the city, and with ideas about what they might look like in the city of the future. This course will be recorded for later viewing by patrons.
Culture & Politics
|
November 2, 2021
2021-11-02
|
Live
|
$
132
Hollywood Victory: The Movies, Stars, and Stories of World War II
Hollywood Victory: The Movies, Stars, and Stories of World War II
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National Archives of the United States
Christian Blauvelt’s book Hollywood Victory tells how the film industry enlisted in the Allied effort during the second World War—a story that started with staunch isolationism as studios sought to maintain the European market and eventually erupted into impassioned support in countless ways. Industry output included war films reminding moviegoers what they were fighting for and "home-front" stories designed to boost the morale of troops overseas. Joining Blauvelt in conversation will be TCM host Ben Mankiewicz. Excerpts from the National Archives’ motion picture holdings will be presented.
Film & Photography
|
November 2, 2021
2021-11-02
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Live from Prairie Lights: Amy Butcher in Conversation with Melissa Febos
Live from Prairie Lights: Amy Butcher in Conversation with Melissa Febos
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Prairie Lights Books
Please join us for a reading from Amy Butcher in conversation with Melissa Febos to celebrate the releases of her book Mothertrucker. Cheryl Strayed, author of Wild says of the book "Amy Butcher’s Mothertrucker is both an intimate portrait of an unforgettable woman and a powerful exploration of how the author finds her way to a more courageous life. There’s truth and beauty on every page of this gorgeous and gripping book.” Amy Butcher is an award-winning essayist and author of the 2015 memoir Visiting Hours (Blue Rider Press / Penguin Random House, 2015) and additional work that has appeared in the New York Times, Granta, Harper’s, The Iowa Review, Lit Hub, Guernica, Brevity, and others. MOTHERTRUCKER is in development to be a major motion picture by Makeready Films, directed by the Primetime Emmy-winning creator of “Transparent” and “I Love Dick,” Joey Soloway, and starring Academy Award and Golden Globe winner Julianne Moore. Excerpts from MOTHERTRUCKER earned a 2020 Individual Excellence Award from the Ohio Arts Council, and Amy’s additional work has benefited from awards and grants from the Vermont Studio Center, the Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts, the Stanley Awards for International Research, and the Olive B. O’Connor Fellowship in Creative Writing from Colgate University. She earned her MFA from the University of Iowa and presently serves as the director of creative writing and an associate professor of English at Ohio Wesleyan University. Amy teaches annually at the Iowa Summer Writing Festival and the Sitka Fine Arts Camp in Sitka, Alaska, and she lives in Ohio with her three rescue dogs, beautiful beasts.
Reading & Writing
|
November 2, 2021
2021-11-02
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Kathryn Kolbert & Julie F. Kay in Conversation With Dr. Jennifer Lincoln
Kathryn Kolbert & Julie F. Kay in Conversation With Dr. Jennifer Lincoln
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Powell's City of Books
Reproductive freedom has never been in more dire straits. Roe v. Wade protected abortion rights and Planned Parenthood v. Casey unexpectedly preserved them. Yet in the following decades these rights have been gutted by restrictive state legislation, the appointment of hundreds of anti-abortion judges, and violence against abortion providers. Today, the ultra-conservative majority at the Supreme Court has activists, medical providers, and everyday Americans worry that we are about to lose our most fundamental reproductive protections. When Roe is toppled, abortion may quickly become a criminal offense in nearly one-third of the United States. At least six states have enacted bans on abortion as early as six weeks of pregnancy – before many women are even aware they are pregnant. Today, 89% of U.S. counties do not have a single abortion provider, in part due to escalating violence and intimidation aimed at disrupting services. In Controlling Women: What We Must Do Now to Save Reproductive Freedom (Hachette), legal titans Kathryn Kolbert and Julie F. Kay share the story of one of the most divisive issues in American politics through behind-the-scenes personal narratives of stunning losses, hard-earned victories, and moving accounts of women and health care providers at the heart of nearly five decades of legal battles. Kolbert and Kay will be joined in conversation by Dr. Jennifer Lincoln, board-certified OB-GYN and author of Let's Talk About Down There.
Reading & Writing
|
November 2, 2021
2021-11-02
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Beginning Acting Online
Beginning Acting Online
-
Berkeley Repertory Theater
Develop a basic understanding of acting fundamentals through Stanislavski-based practice. Using exercises and scene work, this class introduces students to the elements of dramatic action, text analysis, and character development, as well as the tools for releasing inhibitions and expanding vocal and physical range. May be repeated.
Art & Music
|
November 2, 2021
2021-11-02
|
Live
|
$
170
NightSchool: Extreme Life
NightSchool: Extreme Life
-
California Academy of Sciences
You know the saying: “Life finds a way.” Meet the world’s most poisonous bird, tiny thermophiles, and other living organisms that have adapted—and thrive—through extreme measures and in extreme environments.
Science & Nature
|
November 3, 2021
2021-11-03
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
Salamishah Tillet: In Search of The Color Purple
Salamishah Tillet: In Search of The Color Purple
-
Chicago Humanities Festival
It’s hard to overstate the literary and cultural influence of Alice Walker’s Pulitzer-prize winning novel The Color Purple. In the nearly forty years since its publication, this story of Black women coming of age in early twentieth-century Georgia has inspired an Oscar-nominated film, a Tony-award-winning musical, and the work of many contemporary writers, including New York Times critic Salamishah Tillet. Join Tillet and WBEZ reporter Natalie Moore for a conversation about the ongoing significance of this seminal novel as detailed in Tillet’s In Search of The Color Purple.
Reading & Writing
|
November 3, 2021
2021-11-03
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
The Future of Luxury in the US
The Future of Luxury in the US
-
French Institute: Alliance Francaise
Join us for a breakfast and thought-provoking interview with Anish Melwani, Chairman and CEO of LVMH Inc, by Erwan Rambourg, author of Future Luxe: What’s Ahead for the Business of Luxury (2020). Rambourg will discuss with Melwani the ever-increasing demand for iconic luxury goods in the United States, which has recently emerged as a leader in global luxury sales after having historically been considered a developing market in this sector. Their conversation will examine the impact of this structural shift within the luxury industry on LVMH, particularly in terms of the conglomerate’s role in sustainability and consumer identity. In English. Note this will be a live-streamed event from the in-person New York City event.
Culture & Politics
|
November 3, 2021
2021-11-03
|
Live
|
$
10
Ukraine: Perspectives on Democracy in Eastern Europe
Ukraine: Perspectives on Democracy in Eastern Europe
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Stanford Hoover Institution
In this episode of Battlegrounds, H.R. McMaster and former Prime Minister Oleksiy Honcharuk discuss the U.S.-Ukraine relationship, the Russian threat to security, and priorities for reform and strengthening governance in Ukraine.
Culture & Politics
|
November 3, 2021
2021-11-03
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Drawings by Black Artists from the American South
Drawings by Black Artists from the American South
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The Morgan Library & Museum
In celebration of Another Tradition: Drawings by Black Artists from the American South, join three prominent scholars as they consider topics of their choice inspired by the works in the exhibition. Another Tradition focuses on the medium of drawing in the art of Thornton Dial, Sister Gertrude Morgan, Nellie Mae Rowe, Henry Speller, Bill Traylor, Luster Willis, and Purvis Young.
Art & Music
|
November 3, 2021
2021-11-03
|
Live
|
$
15
Art Here, Art There: Zurich, Berlin, St. Petersburg
Art Here, Art There: Zurich, Berlin, St. Petersburg
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NYU School of Professional Studies
Building on traditions: Zurich, Berlin, and St. Petersburg represent exceptional cultural heritage—art, music and literature especially, from the late 19th century onwards. This triad of cities are linked by immigration, radicalization in numerous ways, shaping significant artistic movements historically and in the present. This online course is part of the series Art Here, Art There about modern and contemporary art in major creative centers and markets outside of New York City. While domestic and international travel is restricted due to the pandemic and visits to galleries, museums, and fairs, remain either restricted or non-existent, this series allows art lovers to explore art all over the world from the comfort of their homes. Art Here, Art There goes live inside artist studios, galleries and, when possible, museum exhibitions to give students a first-hand look at art-making in a variety of contexts and interaction with today’s leaders and innovators. The cultural context of each city will be visited to enrich the understanding of art.
Culture & Politics
|
November 3, 2021
2021-11-03
|
Live
|
$
329
Liu Lecture - Debbie Millman: Design Matters
Liu Lecture - Debbie Millman: Design Matters
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Stanford University
Join us for a lecture and Q&A with Debbie Millman, host of the longest-running podcast on design and creativity, Design Matters, and President Emeritus of AIGA and chair and co-founder of the Masters in Branding Program at the School of Visual Arts in New York City. Named “one of the most creative people in business by Fast Company” and “one of the most influential designers working today” by Graphic Design USA, Debbie Millman is an author, educator, strategist and host of the podcast Design Matters. Design Matters is the first and longest running podcast about design and Debbie has interviewed 300 design luminaries and cultural commentators. The show has over 5 million downloads per year, a Cooper Hewitt National Design Award and iTunes designated it one of the best podcasts of 2015. Debbie’s visual essays have appeared in The New York Times, New York Magazine, Print and Fast Company. Her artwork has been exhibited in the Boston Biennale, Chicago Design Museum, Anderson University, SVA, LIU, Wolfsonion Museum and Czong Institute for Contemporary Art. She has been artist-in-residence at Cranbrook University, Old Dominion University and Notre Dame University. She has designed wrapping paper and beach towels for One Kings Lane, greeting cards for Mohawk, MOO and Card-To-Art, playing cards for DeckStarter, notebooks for Shutterstock and Baron Fig and T-shirts for Within The Fold.
Art & Music
|
November 3, 2021
2021-11-03
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Book Talk: Ages of American Capitalism: A History of the United States
Book Talk: Ages of American Capitalism: A History of the United States
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Princeton University
Jonathan Levy is a historian of economic life and of the United States, with interests in the relationships among business history, political economy, legal history, and the history of ideas and culture. In addition to being a member of the Department of History and the John U. Nef Committee on Social Thought he is the current Faculty Director of the Law, Letters, and Society program. Jonathan’s recently completed book is Ages of American Capitalism: A History of the United States (Random House, 2021), which is a history of American economic life from British colonial settlement through the Great Recession. The book is also a single-volume history of the United States. Much of his recent research has sought to place investment at the center of economic history and theory, and, relatedly, to contribute towards the creation of a “Keynesian” paradigm in economic history. Professor Levy is currently working on three projects. The first is a book, The Real Economy, which collects a number of published and unpublished essays which he has written over the past years on economic theory and history, with a focus on capital, corporations, and profit. Another book, The Fetish of Liquidity, is a revised version of a series of lectures that he gave at the École des hautes études en sciences sociales in 2017 on global economic history since the Great Depression. The final project is a climate history of the city of Houston in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Jonathan wrote a series of essays on this topic in 2019 for the Visualizing Climate and Loss Project at Harvard’s Center for History and Economics.
Reading & Writing
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November 3, 2021
2021-11-03
|
Live
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$
FREE
Art with Friends: Art and Air
Art with Friends: Art and Air
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Nasher Sculpture Center
It’s a bird, it has planes, it’s sculpture! Explore how artists use materials and space to make sculptures seem light as air. The Nasher Sculpture Center will share this interactive workshop for school-age children as part of the Dallas Public Library's ongoing series, Art with Friends. Please bring paper, tape, a pencil and pipe cleaners or the wire closures you find on bread bags to create along with us. This is a free program, but advance registration required for interaction. This virtual program is a partnership with the Dallas Public Library.
Art & Music
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November 3, 2021
2021-11-03
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Online Course: Sculpture at the Guggenheim Museum
Online Course: Sculpture at the Guggenheim Museum
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Guggenheim Museums
Focusing on works from the Guggenheim’s collection, this three-part course will unpack the practice and medium of sculpture. The holdings of the Guggenheim exemplify the diversity and range of sculpture as an art form, with works made of traditional materials such as metal, wood, and marble as well as contemporary items, including neon, plastic, and found objects. Participants will dive into the many types of modern and contemporary works that are all classified as “sculpture” and identify key figures such as Ai Weiwei, Louise Bourgeois, Constantin Brancusi, Alexander Calder, Joseph Cornell, Naum Gabo, Alberto Giacometti, Roni Horn, Simone Leigh, Lazlo Moholy-Nagy, and Louise Nevelson who have expanded our notion of the medium. From an emphasis on the hand of the artist to contemporary production methods, this course will trace the developments of the medium, its most innovative artists, and the revolutionary works of art they created. This course will be taught by Joseph Tokumasu Field. Class discussion is highly valued and registrants are encouraged to contribute comments and reflections throughout the live sessions. Optional readings and additional multimedia resources will be offered between sessions. All course sessions will be led virtually through Zoom. A Zoom link and password will be emailed ahead of the course. All times listed in Eastern Time (ET). Course schedule: November 3: Form, Function, and Formality; November 10: Modernist Sculpture; November 17: Contemporary Practice.
Art & Music
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November 3, 2021
2021-11-03
|
Live
|
$
120
Art and Practice with Emory Douglas
Art and Practice with Emory Douglas
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Museum of Modern Art
Art and Practice is a series of programs that bring together emerging and experienced artists to explore the challenges and possibilities of sustaining a creative life. “Create art that challenges the colonization of the imagination.” Emory Douglas invites artists to engage with the above challenge and 11 others included in his Political Artist Manifesto. This participatory session will establish an intergenerational dialogue on the strategies and responsibilities of artists engaged in political struggle. Douglas will draw on his experience creating pow­er­ful images that depict the real­ity of racial injus­tice in Amer­ica and his work as the resident Revolutionary Artist and Minister of Culture for the Black Panther Party from 1967 to the 1980s. Participants are invited to bring their own reflections on the possibilities for activist art-making today, as well as their responses to Douglas’s manifesto. The conversion will be moderated by artist, writer, and educator Colette Gaiter. This program is for anyone who identifies as an artist and/or designer and will take place over Zoom. This program is free, but an application form is required. To keep the conversation intimate, registration is limited and applications will be accepted on a rolling basis.
Art & Music
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November 3, 2021
2021-11-03
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Extinguishing the Myths of the Great Chicago Fire
Extinguishing the Myths of the Great Chicago Fire
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The Newberry Library
Remarkably, no carefully researched popular history of the Great Chicago Fire had been written until now. To celebrate Carl Smith’s book Chicago’s Great Fire: The Destruction and Resurrection of an Iconic American City and the Chicago History Museum’s milestone exhibition, City on Fire: Chicago 1871, this program brings together four acclaimed specialists on Chicago history for an important conversation at the fire’s 150th anniversary. Smith will be joined by US historian Adam Green, Chicago History Museum Assistant Curator Julius Jones, and the Newberry’s Liesl Olson to unpack the geographical and social inequalities that doomed Chicago to burn and to reconsider the myth of the city rising from the ashes.
Culture & Politics
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November 3, 2021
2021-11-03
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Live
|
$
FREE
In Theory, In Practice: Picturing Motherhood Now
In Theory, In Practice: Picturing Motherhood Now
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Cleveland Museum of Art
Join the CMA and ATNSC: Center for Healing and Creative Leadership for an intimate group discussion about topics and themes related to the exhibition Picturing Motherhood Now, utilizing literature from ATNSC’s John D. Carter Resource Library for Consciousness and Change—a gift from the founder of the Gestalt OSD Center. “In Theory, In Practice” is a reading group organized by ATNSC—pronounced Ata-en-sic—that aims to foster critical conversation and collective interventionist practices among artists, community leaders, and educators. The meetings focus on exploring the histories and futures of socially engaged art. In-person and virtual reading group sessions are available on separate dates but feature the same content. Free, ticket required. Participants will receive links to access readings and join the virtual program prior to the session.
Art & Music
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November 3, 2021
2021-11-03
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Narrative Writing Workshop
Narrative Writing Workshop
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Emory Continuing Education
Ultimately, literature is nothing but carpentry, novelist Gabriel Garcia Marquez once observed. "With both you are working with reality, a material just as hard as wood. Both are full of tricks and techniques." This writing-intensive course takes a hands-on approach to the craft of storytelling, exploring the tools, materials, and mechanics used to construct powerful narratives, whether fictional (novels, short stories) or factual (memoir, personal essays). Via readings and exercises, the class investigates the "tricks and techniques" employed by a range of modern masters and apply these lessons to perfecting works in progress. Each week, you'll carefully read and critique classmate submissions, offering constructive feedback in an encouraging context. The course's lectures and discussions will tackle difficulties that writers of all skill levels face: fine-tuning characters and dramatic arcs; organizing scenes and chapters; refining the tone, diction, and rhythm of your prose; cultivating your unique voice; and much more. Whatever your literary passions or favorite genres, this workshop will breathe new life into your narratives and lift your creative craftsmanship to a new level. It is recommended that students complete Essentials of Creative Writing before taking this course.
Reading & Writing
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November 3, 2021
2021-11-03
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Live
|
$
425
Online Course—William Morris: The Beauty of Life
Online Course—William Morris: The Beauty of Life
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V&A Museum
Artist, poet, designer, conservationist and socialist, William Morris was the most innovative designer of his day. His over-arching passions were a love of art and making and a hatred of the inequalities of Victorian society. Following the 125th anniversary of Morris' death, this course explores Morris’s career and ideas about sustainable production, work-life balance and the environment that still resonate today.
Art & Music
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November 4, 2021
2021-11-04
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Live
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$
163
Dante at 700
Dante at 700
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92nd Street Y
Filmmaker Ric Burns delivers a three-session online seminar exploring the continued resonance of one of the greatest literary masterpieces in history, 700 years after Dante’s death. Part One: November 4: Who was Dante? A deep dive into the historical and biographical circumstances and events – social, religious, political, cultural and economic – that shaped Dante’s life from before his birth in 1265, through his upbringing, literary development, and involvement in Florentine politics – culminating in his exile in 1302, and his conception of the Divine Comedy in 1306. Part Two: November 11: The Divine Comedy: The Language, Structure, Narrative and Themes of the Poem. Part Three: November 18: The Poet in Exile and the Afterlife of a Poem: Dante’s life in exile, through his completion of the Comedy, and death in Ravenna in 1321, and the extraordinary story of what happened to the Divine Comedy in the decades, and centuries, to come. This class takes place on Thursdays, November 4, 11, and 18, from 12-1 pm EST. This program will take place live online with an opportunity to interact with the speaker. Sessions will be recorded and made available for patrons for later viewing as well.
Reading & Writing
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November 4, 2021
2021-11-04
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Live
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$
99
In Dialogue: Smithsonian Objects and Social Justice
In Dialogue: Smithsonian Objects and Social Justice
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Smithsonian Institution
Heighten your civic awareness through conversations about art, history and material culture. Each month, educators from the National Portrait Gallery will partner with colleagues from across the Smithsonian to discuss how historical objects from their respective collections speak to today’s social justice issues. How can portraits reveal complex histories? Together with our co-hosts from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, we will explore multiple perspectives on national identity and belonging through portraits of Ruth Asawa and Hung Liu and a painting by Roger Shimomura. The Zoom link will be emailed to registered participants via Eventbrite 12-24 hours in advance of the program. Each participant must register separately. We will only allow participants into the meeting if their names (and email addresses) are on the registration list.
Art & Music
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November 4, 2021
2021-11-04
|
Live
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$
FREE
From the Classics to Pop Culture: An Evening with Daniel Mendelsohn
From the Classics to Pop Culture: An Evening with Daniel Mendelsohn
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McGill University
The Friends of the McGill Library are delighted to welcome Daniel Mendelsohn, internationally bestselling critic, essayist, translator, and author of, among many others, The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million (2006); An Odyssey: A Father, A Son, and An Epic (2017); Ecstasy and Terror: From the Greeks to Game of Thrones (2019); and Three Rings: A Tale of Exile, Narrative, and Fate (2020). The evening will feature a virtual conversation between Daniel Mendelsohn and Allan Hepburn, James McGill Professor of Twentieth-Century Literature at McGill University. Professor Hepburn’s research focuses on the novel - British, American, Irish, Canadian. His areas of interest include twentieth-century fiction, contemporary literature, and aesthetics.
Reading & Writing
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November 4, 2021
2021-11-04
|
Live
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$
FREE
Adult Virtual Workshop: Painting a Watercolor of an Anemone by Fabergé
Adult Virtual Workshop: Painting a Watercolor of an Anemone by Fabergé
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Cleveland Museum of Art
Paint a watercolor of a lovely, delicate, single flower with leaves in a glass vase with shadow. The photo reference is Flower Study of an Anemone by Henrik Wigstrom, House of Fabergé, from the Cleveland Museum of Art’s collection. Participants must provide their own supplies. See recommended supply list. Class is conducted via Zoom. Participants must have access to a smart device (phone, tablet, desktop) with internet access.
Art & Music
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November 4, 2021
2021-11-04
|
Live
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$
40
Night Skies at Home
Night Skies at Home
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The Franklin Institute
Go LIVE with our Chief Astronomer! Join us on Facebook the first Thursday of the month at 7:45 PM. Look to the sky. Find your direction. Chief Astronomer Derrick Pitts invites stargazers of all ages to step outside and join him for the first in a series of night sky tours from home. Amateur astronomers, guided by our very own @coolastronomer, will tour the cosmos, stare at the stars, and be amazed by astronomy—no telescopes needed. How do I recognize a planet? How can I spot the International Space Station? How does the sky move? What type of stars can I see? How do I begin looking for constellations? Ask the questions, satisfy your curiosity, and learn from the best! The Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) project will allow us to see deeper into space, in more detail than ever before. But to explore the depths of space takes some amazing technology here on Earth. Chief Astronomer Derrick Pitts talks to engineering physicist Eric Chisholm, TMT’s Science Instrument Group Leader, to learn what these instruments show us, how they work, and what we hope to discover out there.
Science & Nature
|
November 4, 2021
2021-11-04
|
Live
|
$
FREE
NightSchool: LightSchool
NightSchool: LightSchool
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California Academy of Sciences
Ever wondered what makes certain plants and animals glow in the dark? Join a panel of bioluminescence experts for a deep dive into the inner workings of nature’s glow, including what it can teach us about our relationship with beneficial bacteria, the surprising evolutionary clues it unlocks, and how it has inspired artists and scientists alike. Although many marine organisms are bioluminescent, not all produce light the same way: some species make their own light, whereas more than 500 species of fish and squid rely on a special symbiotic relationship with luminous bacteria to fuel their glow. Join the Academy’s very own Dr. Alison Gould as she shares all about bioluminescent symbioses and what they can teach us about our own relationship with beneficial bacteria. Unlock a new lens through which to view nature aglow with artist Iyvone Khoo, an artist specializing in bioluminescence-related projects. Khoo will give an artist’s perspective on the natural phenomenon, and share the process and challenges of observing bioluminescent plankton to create their art installation Infinity Cube. Although bioluminescence seems like a once-in-a-lifetime phenomenon, bioluminescent systems independently evolved over 90 times! Join UCSB doctoral candidate Emily Lau as she explains the diversity of bioluminescent systems and what they can teach us about convergent evolution, plus details on the biochemical basis of bioluminescence systems and how luminous organisms might acquire molecules to produce light.
Science & Nature
|
November 4, 2021
2021-11-04
|
Live
|
$
FREE
What's Next for Museums?
What's Next for Museums?
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Chicago Humanities Festival
Museums are at the heart of our cultural lives: they are where we go to learn and gather collectively. But the pandemic has restricted access to these spaces, and national conversations around equity are asking museums to reckon with where their collections came from, who they represent, and who has access to them. Join Elizabeth Merritt (American Alliance of Museums), Chevy Humphrey (Museum of Science and Industry), and Lisa Yun Lee (Public Housing Museum) for a conversation about how museums will shift and change as we move into a new stage of the pandemic and come back together in public spaces.
Culture & Politics
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November 5, 2021
2021-11-05
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
More perfect and excellent than men: The Women Artists of Bologna
More perfect and excellent than men: The Women Artists of Bologna
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National Gallery of Art
Early modern Bologna was exceptional for its many talented women artists. Thanks to a long-standing tradition of honoring accomplished women, several attentive artistic biographers, strong local interest in collecting women’s work, and permissive attitudes toward women studying with male artists who were not family members, Bologna was home to more women artists than any other city in early modern Italy. Bolognese women artists were unusual not only for their large numbers but also for their varied specializations and frequent public success. They painted altarpieces, nudes, mythologies, allegories, portraits, and self-portraits, creating sculptures, drawings, prints, embroidery, and paintings. This lecture challenges some common assumptions about women artists, suggesting productive approaches for future research.
Art & Music
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November 5, 2021
2021-11-05
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Live
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$
FREE
Blackness in Contemporary African Art Practice
Blackness in Contemporary African Art Practice
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Tate Britain
This panel considers ways in which contemporary African artists, curators and writers deal with the question of Blackness in their work. It asks how an African experience of Blackness differs from that of the diaspora and from country to country. The presentations consider a continent-specific account of Blackness through relationships with spirituality, ancestry, (settler) colonialism and Black womanhood. Speakers include Nomusa Makhubu, Minna Salami and Suzana Sousa. This event took place on Zoom on 1 June 2021. A recording of the event will be available to watch on this page until 15 July 2021.
Art & Music
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November 7, 2021
2021-11-07
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On-Demand
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$
FREE
NightSchool: Resilient Forests
NightSchool: Resilient Forests
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California Academy of Sciences
Fire is essential to forest life—hear from experts tending fires and ensuring a more resilient California.
Science & Nature
|
November 7, 2021
2021-11-07
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
Modern to Contemporary Art History: 1960 to the Present
Modern to Contemporary Art History: 1960 to the Present
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School of the Art Institute of Chicago
The work of art in the age of digital production requires a longer and more critical look. In this five-week course, students will discuss the relative impact of works of art made in the more recent past, and work being made today. SAIC Continuing Studies, Art History from the Ground Up, can provide a foundation for some of the issues raised in this class, but is not required for those who choose to jump right into Contemporary Art. Week 1: Modern Art in the Mainstream 1950 - 1990; Week 2: Global Modernism; Week 3: What is Contemporaneity?; Week 4: Media and Mediums in Contemporary Art; Week 5: Chicago Art Now.
Art & Music
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November 7, 2021
2021-11-07
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Live
|
$
250
Getty Talks: Egyptology Meets Science
Getty Talks: Egyptology Meets Science
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Getty
In this inspiring talk, Christian Greco, director of the Egyptian Museum of Turin, shows how he breathes new life into old discoveries and modernized the nearly 200-year-old museum dedicated to Egyptian art and culture. Previously recorded at the Getty Villa.
Art & Music
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November 8, 2021
2021-11-08
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On-Demand
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$
FREE
Australian Food with Bill Granger
Australian Food with Bill Granger
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Sydney Opera House
Crowned the ‘Egg Master of Sydney’ and ‘creator of avocado toast’, Bill Granger is renowned as the restauranteur who brought laid-back Australian cafe culture to the world, and is beloved by family cooks and culinary sophisticates alike. The empire that is ‘bills’ began with the original Darlinghurst street-corner cafe 26 years ago and is credited as the first place anywhere to put the now-iconic breakfast of avocado toast on the menu. Since then, from Sydney to Tokyo, London to Seoul, people around the world have queued for a taste of his absurdly fluffy ricotta hotcakes and creamy scrambled eggs, and fallen in love with this sunny, relaxed, and very Australian way of eating. Ahead of his new book release, Australian Food, Bill Granger talks with food writer Adam Liaw to celebrate the global phenomenon of Australian cafe culture, the evolution of a national cuisine and the uniqueness of Australian food. Recorded live in July, 2020 from the Sydney Opera House.
Food & Drink
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November 9, 2021
2021-11-09
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On-Demand
|
$
FREE
Beyond the Mask: Contemporary Canadian Art During COVID
Beyond the Mask: Contemporary Canadian Art During COVID
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Royal Ontario Museum
Ottawa-based artist Don Kwan joins ROM curators Wen-chien Cheng and Fahmida Suleman to explore the use of mask forms as part of his contemporary practice. Kwan’s art reflects on anti-Asian racism and his experiences as a Chinese-Canadian, and now plays an important role as part of the ROM’s permanent collections. Kwan's mask shown above, Veneration for Mom and Dad, is made from Joss paper ("spirit money") and is included in the current ROM-original exhibition Unmasking the Pandemic: From Personal Protection to Personal Expression.
Art & Music
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November 9, 2021
2021-11-09
|
Live
|
$
FREE
5 Questions, 5 Artists Reframing Portraiture | Jordan Casteel
5 Questions, 5 Artists Reframing Portraiture | Jordan Casteel
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Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Presented in conjunction with Black American Portraits, an exhibition that reframes portraiture to center Black American subjects, sitters, and spaces, this series will include conversations between artists and LACMA curators and educators. Each artist will be presented with the same five key questions about portraiture, exploring how this art form functioned historically in an encyclopedic collection while also providing us with new perspectives on representation.
Art & Music
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November 9, 2021
2021-11-09
|
Live
|
$
FREE
On Community: Thelma Golden in Conversation with Dr. Kenneth Montague, Jamel Shabazz, and Xaviera Simmons
On Community: Thelma Golden in Conversation with Dr. Kenneth Montague, Jamel Shabazz, and Xaviera Simmons
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Aperture Foundation
Join Aperture for the first event in an exciting online series celebrating As We Rise: Photography from the Black Atlantic. Drawn from Dr. Kenneth Montague’s Wedge Collection in Toronto—a Black-owned collection dedicated to artists of African descent—As We Rise looks at the multifaceted ideas of Black life through the lenses of community, identity, and power. On the topic of community, artist and curator Liz Ikiriko states in As We Rise, “There is a sense of seeking in photographs of Black subjects by Black photographers; a search for visual cues that, when found, have the power to present the world from a familiar, loving perspective—from within that community.” In this discussion, moderated by Thelma Golden, Dr. Kenneth Montague, Jamel Shabazz, and Xaviera Simmons will consider the ways community plays a key role in their work.
Film & Photography
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November 9, 2021
2021-11-09
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Poems and Paintings
Poems and Paintings
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Barnes Foundation
Many well-known poems were inspired by paintings and objects seen during museum visits—John Keats’s “Ode on a Grecian Urn” is one famous example. Using the Barnes method of analyzing works of art, we will compare our visual observations with the imagery and literary devices of various writers. This course is designed to encourage students’ questions and opinions. Works guiding our dialogue will include paintings by Picasso, O’Keeffe, and Hopper and poetry by Sontag, Updike, and Sandburg.
Art & Music
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November 10, 2021
2021-11-10
|
Live
|
$
220
Celebrating Flora from Copenhagen to Kawartha Lakes
Celebrating Flora from Copenhagen to Kawartha Lakes
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Royal Ontario Museum
Join ROM's Deborah Metsger in conversation with botanist Dale Leadbeater, co-author of the newly published Flora of Kawartha Lakes, as they explore the rich tradition of botanical exploration and documentation - from the 18th-century to today. Encapsulating the depth and breadth of the botanical world, discover the important role regional Flora play in understanding the past and planning for the future.
Science & Nature
|
November 10, 2021
2021-11-10
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Art, Travel, and the Pacific
Art, Travel, and the Pacific
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92nd Street Y
Join art historian Kathryn Brown for a dive into the people and culture of one of the strongest influences on 20th century Western artists. The arts and cultures of the Pacific Islands were a source of inspiration for many 19th- and 20th-century European and American artists. Come and explore the different ways in which artists including Paul Gauguin, Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Max Ernst, Georgia O’Keefe, Isamu Noguchi, and Barnett Newman took inspiration from the landscapes, seascapes, and creative histories of a region that had become known as “Oceania”. We will also delve into challenging histories and cross-cultural encounters that feature in exciting contemporary works by artists from the region including Yuki Kihara, Michael Parekowhai, John Pule, Lisa Reihana, and Michael Tuffery. This two session class will be recorded for later viewing by patrons.
Art & Music
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November 10, 2021
2021-11-10
|
Live
|
$
104
Propaganda War: The Committee on Public Information & World War I
Propaganda War: The Committee on Public Information & World War I
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Library of Congress
During the summer of 1918, the American Expeditionary Force engaged its first large-scale battles of the war, yet this effort and the American public’s support of it required an unprecedented propaganda campaign by the newly created Committee on Public Information (CPI). Signed into law by Woodrow Wilson and overseen by George Creel, CPI would have long-ranging consequences for the government, military, and free press. John Maxwell Hamilton, Hopkins P. Breazeale LSU Foundation Professor of Journalism at Louisiana State University and a Senior Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center in Washington, D.C. joins us to discuss his award-winning 2020 book, "Manipulating the Masses: Woodrow Wilson and the Birth of American Propaganda" and the issues it engages and the questions it asks about the role of journalism, government, and propaganda during wartime in a democracy. This discussion, moderated by historian Ryan Reft and reference librarian Bruce Kirby, will demonstrate how researchers search for and discover relevant materials within the Manuscript Division’s holdings, draw conclusions and arguments from historical documents, and connect historical events and trends to our present day circumstances.
Culture & Politics
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November 10, 2021
2021-11-10
|
Live
|
$
FREE
ICP Talks: Pacifico Silano
ICP Talks: Pacifico Silano
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The International Center of Photography
Pacifico Silano is a conceptual lens-based artist whose practice engages with image circulation and print culture to explore lost histories specifically for the LGBTQ community. In his recent book, I Wish I Never Saw the Sunshine, Silano cuts, crops, and layers printed vintage ephemera of gay culture, to comment on the impact of the HIV/AID crisis on the LGBTQ community and on Silano personally, who lost his uncle at the height of the crisis. Silano will be joined by ICP’s managing director of programs, David Campany and the discussion will be followed by an audience Q&A.
Film & Photography
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November 10, 2021
2021-11-10
|
Live
|
$
6
Before Yesterday We Could Fly: An Afrofuturist Period Room Virtual Opening
Before Yesterday We Could Fly: An Afrofuturist Period Room Virtual Opening
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The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Before Yesterday We Could Fly: An Afrofuturist Period Room, like any of The Met’s period rooms, is a fabrication of a domestic space that assembles furnishings and objects to create a fiction of authenticity. Rather than affirm a fixed moment in time, however, this structure reimagines the immersive experience of the period room by embracing the African diasporic belief that the past, present, and future are interconnected. Join us for a virtual tour of this exhibition whose narrative is generated by the real, lived history of Seneca Village, a vibrant community founded predominantly by free Black tenants and landowners that flourished from the 1820s to the 1850s just a few hundred yards west of The Met’s current site. In 1857, the City of New York destroyed Seneca Village, using eminent domain to seize land for the construction of Central Park, displacing its residents and leaving only the barest traces of the community behind. Acknowledging that injustice, the exhibition asks: What if this community had the opportunity to grow and thrive? Powered by Afrofuturism—the inspirational, creative mode that centers Black imagination and self-determination—the exhibition transforms a 19th-century domestic interior into a speculative future home for Seneca Village residents, only one proposition for what might have been had the community been allowed to thrive into the present and beyond. In keeping with the collaborative spirit of Afrofuturism, The Met’s curatorial team worked with lead curator Hannah Beachler to envision and design the space with consulting curator Michelle Commander. Since 2019, the group has engaged numerous creative and intellectual partners to infuse the installation with additional ideas and perspectives. At a vital intersection at the heart of the Museum, this project opens a space for yet more histories to be told that look toward a more resilient future.
Art & Music
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November 10, 2021
2021-11-10
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Virtual Book Talk: Not One Inch: America, Russia, and the Making of Post-Cold War Stalemate
Virtual Book Talk: Not One Inch: America, Russia, and the Making of Post-Cold War Stalemate
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Boston Athenaeum
Not one inch. With these words, Secretary of State James Baker proposed a hypothetical bargain to Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev after the fall of the Berlin Wall: if you let your part of Germany go, we will move NATO not one inch eastward. Controversy erupted almost immediately over this 1990 exchange—but more important was the decade to come, when the words took on new meaning. Gorbachev let his Germany go, but Washington rethought the bargain, not least after the Soviet Union’s own collapse in December 1991. Washington realized it could not just win big but win bigger. Not one inch of territory needed to be off limits to NATO. On the thirtieth anniversary of the Soviet collapse, this book uses new evidence and interviews to show how, in the decade that culminated in Vladimir Putin’s rise to power, the United States and Russia undermined a potentially lasting partnership. Prize-winning historian M. E. Sarotte shows what went wrong.
Reading & Writing
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November 10, 2021
2021-11-10
|
Live
|
$
5
Virtual Conversation: Maria Gaspar and Legacy Russell
Virtual Conversation: Maria Gaspar and Legacy Russell
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Art Institute of Chicago
Artist Maria Gaspar joins Legacy Russell, executive director and chief curator of The Kitchen, New York, for a virtual conversation. Maria Gaspar (American, b. 1980) is a Chicago-based interdisciplinary artist negotiating the politics of location through installation, sculpture, sound, and performance. Gaspar’s work addresses issues of spatial justice in order to amplify, mobilize, or divert structures of power through individual and collective gestures. Legacy Russell is a curator and writer born and raised in New York City. Her academic, curatorial, and creative work focuses on gender, performance, digital selfdom, internet idolatry, and new media ritual.
Art & Music
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November 10, 2021
2021-11-10
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Atlantic Live: Future Economy Summit
Atlantic Live: Future Economy Summit
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The Atlantic
The global pandemic has forced many to reevaluate the future of our economy and the way we work. Will urban dwellers migrate to more affordable suburban regions? Will we ever return to traditional offices full-time? Will entrepreneurs use this change in routine to discover the next big thing? What jobs will offer a path to opportunity? The biggest recession in almost 100 years has changed the economic landscape, and not everyone has the luxury of exploring these big questions. Many workers have been left without a financial safety net or the skills needed to succeed in a virtual economy. The gap between the rich and the poor continues to widen, and leaders in Washington can’t agree on substantive solutions. The path to the new economy is being charted today. The Atlantic will explore what the future might hold for Americans across the socioeconomic spectrum.
Culture & Politics
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November 11, 2021
2021-11-11
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On-Demand
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$
FREE
What's Next: Money
What's Next: Money
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Chicago Humanities Festival
Money has been the medium of exchange for thousands of years, but what it looks like and how it functions has changed enormously over time. Our current moment is no exception, with the spectre of a cashless society growing every day alongside the increasingly volatile impact of cryptocurrencies like non-fungible tokens (NFTs). Join a group of historians, scholars, and leaders in cryptocurrencies to learn about the complex role currency plays in our society, how our relationship to money continues to evolve, and what new forms money might take in the future.
Culture & Politics
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November 11, 2021
2021-11-11
|
Live
|
$
5
Stanford and University of Chicago in Conversation: The Crisis of American Democracy
Stanford and University of Chicago in Conversation: The Crisis of American Democracy
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Stanford Continuing Studies
Could American democracy’s long, ambitious run come to an end? It’s not unthinkable. As William G. Howell (University of Chicago) and Terry M. Moe (Stanford) argue in their book, Presidents, Populism, and the Crisis of Democracy, the United States faces a historic crisis that threatens its system of self-government—and if democracy is to be saved, the causes of this crisis must be understood and defused. Disruptive social forces—globalization, automation, immigration—have generated cultural anxieties and economic harms for tens of millions of Americans: problems that our government has been entirely ineffective at addressing. The result has been a surge in populist, anti-government rage that has dangerously reshaped our political landscape and threatened to bring our democracy down. What can be done to safeguard American democracy? The disruptive forces of modernity cannot be stopped. The solution lies, Howell and Moe argue, in having a government that can deal with them effectively—and thus in having a presidency that, with appropriate reforms, is powerful enough to promote effective government yet sufficiently constrained that a rogue president cannot threaten democracy itself. During this conversation jointly sponsored by Stanford and University of Chicago, Howell and Moe will discuss their prescriptions for addressing the nation’s crisis of American democracy, while also reflecting on the first year of the Biden administration—a year that saw the country emerging from a pandemic and seeking effective government through presidential policies that boldly echo F.D.R.’s New Deal.
Culture & Politics
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November 11, 2021
2021-11-11
|
Live
|
$
FREE
In Focus: Kodak Pictures Spots, Then and Now
In Focus: Kodak Pictures Spots, Then and Now
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Eastman Museum
One hundred years ago, the Kodak "Picture Ahead" marketing campaign was introduced into the American landscape. Over time, these markers evolved from their earliest appearances as roadside markers highlighting particular subjects to photograph, to their later Kodak Picture Spot iterations and installations within world's fairs, local and national parks, and Disney theme parks. These signs helped to promote picture-taking behavior throughout much of the past century and were the subject of Leslie K. Brown's popular Focus 45 talk in 2016. Her subsequent PhD dissertation drew largely from the George Eastman Legacy Collection, corporate archives, and her own Kodak family history. To commemorate the centennial of the Kodak "Picture Ahead" campaign, Brown will revisit their presentation with some updates and new additions to provide a historical overview of this cultural phenomenon.
Film & Photography
|
November 12, 2021
2021-11-12
|
Live
|
$
10
Library Book Club Online: Anthony Cody
Library Book Club Online: Anthony Cody
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Poetry Foundation
All are welcome to a monthly book group moderated by library staff. In November, we will read and discuss Borderland Apocrypha by Anthony Cody. Registration is required for this event, and opens on October 1, 2021. Registration emails sent prior to this date will be disregarded. To register, email library@poetryfoundation.org with the date of the Book Club you would like to attend. To allow for more readers to participate in Book Club, readers are welcome to register for either the October Library Book Club discussion of Incendiary Art by Patricia Smith or the November Library Book Club discussion of Borderland Apocrypha by Anthony Cody, but not both sessions. All participants residing in the United States will be offered a complimentary copy of the book for the session they are registered in. If you would like to have a copy of that title mailed to you, please include your mailing address in your registration email.
Reading & Writing
|
November 12, 2021
2021-11-12
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Virtual Conversation: Rethinking the 17th-Century Dutch Galleries
Virtual Conversation: Rethinking the 17th-Century Dutch Galleries
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Art Institute of Chicago
Join Jacquelyn N. Coutré, Eleanor Wood Prince Associate Curator of Painting and Sculpture of Europe; Jonathan Tavares, associate curator of Applied Arts of Europe; and Jamie Gabbarelli, Prince Trust Associate Curator of Prints and Drawings, for a cross-departmental discussion of the recent reinstallation of Galleries 212 and 213, which feature Dutch art of the 17th century.
Art & Music
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November 12, 2021
2021-11-12
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Writing on the Wall
Writing on the Wall
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Getty
Writing on walls has existed in many forms since ancient times, with examples of graffiti dating back to ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome. Whether as vandalism or high art, a form of communication, devotion, or advertising, humans have always wanted to leave their mark on the infrastructure. Join two of Los Angeles’s most influential street artists, Defer and Prime, and Iraqi artist Osama Sadiq as they demonstrate their practice and talk with rare books curator David Brafman about the interplay of words and images, a tradition that began thousands of years ago. Complements the exhibition Mesopotamia: Civilization Begins. David Brafman has been the rare books curator at the Getty Research Institute since 2002. His interest and admiration for graffiti, sparked during his Brooklyn-based childhood, is evidenced in his work with projects such as LA Liber Amicorum, recently published as the L.A. Graffiti Black Book, and exhibitions such as Scratch (2014) which he curated at the El Segundo Museum of Art. Prior to arriving on the West Coast, Brafman earned his PhD in classics and Arabic from Duke University, was an adjunct professor in the NYU Classics Department, and resident-expert at H.P. Kraus, Rare Books and Manuscripts, one of the world's leading dealers in rare books and manuscripts from the Middle Ages to the Enlightenment.
Art & Music
|
November 13, 2021
2021-11-13
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
Reckoning with Reparations What the United States Could Learn From Germany
Reckoning with Reparations What the United States Could Learn From Germany
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USC Shoah Foundation
Join USC Shoah Foundation Finci-Viterbi Executive Director Stephen Smith as he moderates a panel discussion around the issues of reparation, memory, justice and equity. Germany’s role in the Holocaust has forced it to address material claims since the immediate aftermath of WWII. Despite a long history with reparations, some Germans hold ambivalence or even pride in the acts they participated in during WWII. The recent documentary film by acclaimed filmmaker Luke Holland, Final Account, lays bare the diversity of perspectives on Germany’s past and opens opportunities for discussion around the concept of reparations and whether and how monetary compensation in the aftermath of mass violence can change attitudes and behaviors in the present. What can America learn from the example of Germany? This event, part of USC’s Stronger Than Hate Initiative, is presented in partnership with Wilshire Boulevard Temple, and is co-organized by USC Dornsife Casden Institute for the Study of Jewish Role in American Life and USC Shoah Foundation.
Culture & Politics
|
November 14, 2021
2021-11-14
|
Live
|
$
FREE
NightSchool: Surviving the Deadly Bucket
NightSchool: Surviving the Deadly Bucket
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California Academy of Sciences
Five vans, one plane, two states, one thousand miles, four organizations, two hundred people and one... banana box. On average in a season this is what it takes to save one little life. Learn from the experts and volunteers saving—and flying—hundreds of baby sea turtles from the "Deadly Bucket" in Cape Cod back to safety on the Gulf Coast each year.
Science & Nature
|
November 15, 2021
2021-11-15
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
Virtual Ocean Talk: Captain Cook-Man or Myth?
Virtual Ocean Talk: Captain Cook-Man or Myth?
-
Join Professor John Maynard and Peter FitzSimons for a pre-recorded live discussion from Apri, 2020, about the legend of Captian Cook. This is part of the Maritime Museum's virtual ocean talk series.
Culture & Politics
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November 16, 2021
2021-11-16
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
Lunch Break Science: Deming Yang
Lunch Break Science: Deming Yang
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The Leakey Foundation
Gather with Leakey Foundation grantee Deming Yang and learn about paleoenvironments and hominin evolution.
Science & Nature
|
November 16, 2021
2021-11-16
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
Virtual Writing Hour
Virtual Writing Hour
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Smithsonian Institution
Join Smithsonian and other writers for a virtual, creative writing hour at the National Portrait Gallery! Our goal is to create a virtual space where writers can create, connect, and draw inspiration from the Portrait Gallery's online exhibitions on Google Arts and Culture. We will provide writing prompts, and you are also welcome to bring your own writing project-in-progress. We will write for about 30 minutes and end each session with a brief discussion or reading.
Reading & Writing
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November 16, 2021
2021-11-16
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Chicago and Civil Rights in the 1960s
Chicago and Civil Rights in the 1960s
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The Newberry Library
“I have seen many demonstrations in the south, but I have never seen anything so hostile and so hateful as I’ve seen here today.” Martin Luther King Jr. said these words in Chicago. In January 1966, King launched the Chicago Freedom Movement, his dramatic attempt to bring the moral weight of his activism to the segregation and discrimination that plagued the urban north. “We’re going to create a new city,” he promised in the campaign’s first days. Instead, he came up against an old city determined to protect its color lines. At the movement’s defining march in August 1966, white Chicagoans battered protesters with bottles, bricks, and cherry bombs, and Dr. King was struck by a rock. King’s Chicago campaign occurred at the middle of a tumultuous decade shaped by competing visions of American society. In this installment of “Conversations at the Newberry,” Kevin Boyle and Clayborne Carson, two historians who have studied the civil rights movement, the United States during the 1960s, and the life of Dr. King, will discuss the troubling history of this era and reflect on its continuing impact over the past half century.
Culture & Politics
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November 16, 2021
2021-11-16
|
Live
|
$
FREE
NightSchool: Down Under
NightSchool: Down Under
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California Academy of Sciences
Gather with us for a session dedicated to the unique wildlife and ecosystems of Australia. Tune in for stories about platypuses, flying-foxes, koalas, and wombats, and how these populations are faring while facing climate change, wildfires, and urban development. Also: Find out how wombats produce cube-shaped poop. Wildlife photographer Doug Gimesy doesn’t have to travel far from home to find interesting conservation stories—it helps that his home is in southeastern Australia. He’ll talk about two of the fascinating animals that he’s covered close to his hometown of Melbourne—flying-foxes and platypuses. Australia’s iconic koalas aren’t doing well. Dr. Christine Hosking, Conservation Planner at the University of Queensland, talks about the population’s plummeting numbers and the country’s recent bushfires, drought, and increased urban development that threaten them, and what conservation models are needed to avoid the species’ extinction. To mark their territory, wombats build cairns with their cube-shaped poop. But how can their soft intestines make cubes in the first place? Dr. David Hu is an expert in the biomechanics of animal locomotion, and his lab at Georgia Tech recently won an Ig Nobel prize in physics for their work explaining just how it works—and how it might be applicable to the wider world.
Science & Nature
|
November 17, 2021
2021-11-17
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
The Fight Against Black Voter Supression
The Fight Against Black Voter Supression
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NYU School of Professional Studies
The 2020 US elections demonstrated the historic legacy of Black voter suppression with the proliferation of coronavirus misinformation as one of the means to reduce Black voter turnout for the general election. In the fight for equal access to the right to vote, advocates and allies need to engage on several fronts, including collaborating with grassroots organizations, mainstream media, digital infrastructures, and social networks, to properly fight against the disenfranchisement of the communities of color hardest hit by the current pandemic. We will look at research conducted by Mutale Nkonde, an AI policy analyst and researcher based in New York City, that analyzes disinformation and its effect on the suppression of Black votes. This workshop will provide practical, community-based tools to engage with national and international advocacy networks. We will discuss several challenges from the 2020 election and examine the media’s role in informing the public and actively committing to protect the Black vote by amplifying the voice of Black political leaders.
Culture & Politics
|
November 17, 2021
2021-11-17
|
Live
|
$
59
Elaine K. Ng | Guest Artist Live Stream
Elaine K. Ng | Guest Artist Live Stream
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Corning Museum of Glass
Join us for live stream with Rockwell Collaborative Guest Artist Elaine K. Ng as she works together with Museum gaffers to experiment and realize her designs in glass. Multidisciplinary artist Elaine K. Ng currently has two special installations on view at The Rockwell Museum, including a site-specific installation as part of the ongoing Antigravity Project. This livestreamed demo marks the conclusion of Ng's three-day guest appearance in The Corning Museum of Glass Amphitheater Hot Shop.
Art & Music
|
November 17, 2021
2021-11-17
|
Live
|
$
FREE
An Argument for Healthy Longevity and Public Health
An Argument for Healthy Longevity and Public Health
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Columbia University
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health's Centennial Distinguished Speakers Series presents a discussion on healthy longevity and public health. The public is welcome to join this virtual conversation with speakers Victor J. Dzau, MD, President, National Academy of Medicine; ad Linda P. Fried, MD, MPH, Dean, Columbia Mailman School of Public Health; with Adriane Berg (moderator), Executive Director of The Kitalys Institute, USA.
Health & Wellness
|
November 17, 2021
2021-11-17
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Drawing Together: Corot
Drawing Together: Corot
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The Frick Collection
Join us for an online drawing program that centers mindfulness and community. Each session begins with short drawing warm-ups, followed by a close look at a work of art for inspiration and open-ended art-making prompts. Drawing Together provides a space to make and share in the company of others, welcoming everyone with an interest in cultivating their creativity. No art background is required. Live captioning will be provided. Instructions for joining through Zoom, as well as the prompts and works of art, will be provided in an email to registered participants 1–2 days in advance. Free with online advance registration.
Art & Music
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November 17, 2021
2021-11-17
|
Live
|
$
FREE
The Poetics of Art and Intervention
The Poetics of Art and Intervention
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Getty
This program explores the role of artists as cultural curators, and how visual art, poetry, criticism, and other forms of cultural production have the power to confront the ideological and political systems that “define” communities, national borders, and social values, and yet are still rooted in systems of bias, injustice, and race. How are contemporary writers, artists, and thinkers reimagining the relationship between the idea of art canons and “belonging,” and the reality of historical exclusion? How might a strategy of “intervention” push the fields of art practice and art history to question established narratives, and set the tone for a broader and more engaged future? In this conversation, Getty curator LeRonn Brooks brings together Claudia Rankine, Monica Youn, and Jess Row to discuss how their creative practices engage with the poetics of art and intervention.
Art & Music
|
November 17, 2021
2021-11-17
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Live from Prairie Lights: Alexander McCall Smith in Conversation with Joshilyn Jackson
Live from Prairie Lights: Alexander McCall Smith in Conversation with Joshilyn Jackson
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Prairie Lights Books
Prairie Lights is excited to host Alexander McCall Smith in conversation with Joshilyn Jackson to celebrate the release of Smith's new book The Joy and Light Bus Company. The event is in partnership with Book Passage and The King's English Bookshop. Tickets include a tip-in, signed hardcover copy of The Joy and Light Bus Company.. You can receive your copy by Media Mail Shipping after the event. Kirkus Review says of The Joy and Light Bus Company, “Comfort-food reading, and never more welcome.” Alexander McCall Smith is the author of the No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency novels and of a number of other series and stand-alone books. His works have been translated into more than forty languages and have been best sellers throughout the world. He lives in Scotland. New York Times and USA Today bestselling novelist Joshilyn Jackson is the author of ten books, including Mother May I, The Almost Sisters, and Never Have I Ever. Her work has been translated into more than a dozen languages, and Jackson is also an award-winning audiobook narrator. She writes page-turners that revolve around women’s issues and faith and justice issues. Jackson lives in Decatur, Georgia, with her family.
Reading & Writing
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November 18, 2021
2021-11-18
|
Live
|
$
35
Conversatory on Rights Around the World: Limits of Supranational Justice : The European Court of Human Rights & Turkey's Kurdish Conflict
Conversatory on Rights Around the World: Limits of Supranational Justice : The European Court of Human Rights & Turkey's Kurdish Conflict
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The Fromm Institute
The Fromm Institute invites you to conversations of ideas, views and experiences on the topic of Rights Around the World. Join Fromm Institute Professor Mara Kolesas in a conversation with guest speakers followed by a question and answer period with attendees. Each conversatory is designed to build on the others, however attendance at prior conversatories is not required. All events are free and open to the public, but attendance is limited. Dilek Kurban is a Max Weber postdoctoral fellow at the European University Institute (2021-2022). She holds a PhD from Maastricht University Law Faculty, a JD from Columbia Law School and a master’s from Columbia University. Her dissertation received the Erasmus Prize in the Netherlands and was published as a monograph under the title Limits of Supranational Justice: The European Court of Human Rights and Turkey’s Kurdish Conflict (CUP, 2020). The book has been awarded a Special Mention by the 2021 International Society of Public Law (ICON.S) Book Prize Committee. Kurban’s research interests are regional human rights courts, state violence, legal mobilization and judicial politics, with a particular focus on authoritarian regimes and a regional focus on Turkey. Her research has also been published in edited volumes and in peer-reviewed journals, including Human Rights Law Review and Columbia Human Rights Law Review. Before transitioning to academia, Kurban engaged in policy-oriented research in Turkey. Earlier in her career, Kurban worked at the UN Department of Political Affairs in New York.
Culture & Politics
|
November 18, 2021
2021-11-18
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Online Talk: Cézanne in the Barnes Foundation: A Conversation with the Editors
Online Talk: Cézanne in the Barnes Foundation: A Conversation with the Editors
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Barnes Foundation
This special program celebrates the publication of Cézanne in the Barnes Foundation, our much-anticipated catalogue that presents years of research by an international team of scholars. The volume’s co-editors—Nancy Ireson, André Dombrowski, and Sylvie Patry—will discuss the overarching goals (and challenges) of the project, the collaborative working process between art historians and conservators, and the significance of the Barnes collection’s Cézannes in the context of the artist’s oeuvre. The program is moderated by Jodi Hauptman, curator of the acclaimed exhibition Cézanne Drawing, on view at MoMA through September 25.
Art & Music
|
November 18, 2021
2021-11-18
|
Live
|
$
8
Design = Change: Better Shelter in Austin
Design = Change: Better Shelter in Austin
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Museum of Design Atlanta
Join us for a virtual discussion with Jared Slack, Director of Relationships and Giving for The Other Ones Foundation, and David Porter, Executive Director of Glimmer Austin. Through their recent collaboration in Austin, Texas, they will help the audience recognize the significant impact Better Shelter is having on the Esperanza Community. With their shared mission in mind, the organizations continue to provide temporary homes, safety, and dignity to the houseless. Better Shelter is a social enterprise based in Stockholm, Sweden, originally initiated in partnership with the IKEA Foundation and UNHCR and currently on view as part of our current exhibition Survival Architecture & the Art of Resilience.
Culture & Politics
|
November 18, 2021
2021-11-18
|
Live
|
$
5
Autumn Book Club: Steve Martin’s An Object of Beauty
Autumn Book Club: Steve Martin’s An Object of Beauty
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The Frick Collection
Join us for a discussion of Steve Martin’s An Object of Beauty, led by Michelle McCarthy-Behler, Reference Lead. This satirical, fictional work centers on the experiences of Lacey Yeager, a young art entrepreneur determined to ascend the professional and social ranks of New York City’s elite art market. Told from the perspective of Lacey’s journalist friend, Daniel Franks, the novel questions the concepts of value and beauty as it explores the meaning and evolution of one’s entanglement in the art world. The book is available as an e-book via our partnership with the Internet Archives' Open Library. It is also available in e-book, audiobook, and book formats through the New York Public Library and other libraries.
Reading & Writing
|
November 18, 2021
2021-11-18
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Dressed-Up Chicken Soup with Pati Jinich
Dressed-Up Chicken Soup with Pati Jinich
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92nd Street Y
Emmy-nominated and James Beard Award-winning chef Pati Jinich joins us with a fabulous class that takes you into the heart of the soulful Mexican cooking that is the focus of her PBS show watched by millions, Pati’s Mexican Table. This class brings the effervescent Pati and her kitchen right into your own, where she’ll teach you how to make her Dressed-Up Chicken Soup. It’s a soup that, in its basic version, can be found throughout Mexico, and Pati will explore the diversity and regionalism of the country’s vibrant cuisine, introducing variations and ingredients shifts to be found in different regions. “Soup is a warm way of getting to know a culture and its people,” says Pati. Join her and learn how to make this rich and beautiful dish, and get an authentic taste of Mexico that goes even deeper than its glorious food. This class will be recorded for later viewing by patrons.
Food & Drink
|
November 18, 2021
2021-11-18
|
Live
|
$
25
Lunch Break Science: Christopher Schmitt
Lunch Break Science: Christopher Schmitt
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The Leakey Foundation
Gather with Leakey Foundation grantee Christopher Schmitt and learn about the development and life histories of primates, especially vervet monkeys.
Science & Nature
|
November 19, 2021
2021-11-19
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
Ancient Alcohol 2021
Ancient Alcohol 2021
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The University of Pennsylvania
People have been drinking together for thousands of years. Log on, grab a drink, and let us be your designated driver as you virtually explore how our ancestors partied like it was 5000 BCE. Along with the beer pairings suggested below, grab some corn meal. Attendees will be invited to “chew” along with us and learn how to make chicha—an ancient Andean beer made from chewed corn! This highly engaging and interactive virtual program brings you back in time to uncover the earliest known beer, try unexpected brewing techniques from South America, and learn how an ancient cousin of tequila was fermented from agave sap. If you joined us for this program last year, you will recall some of our favorite stories, including the Mesopotamian queen who drank her beer out of a straw and the recreation of a beverage served at a funerary feast hosted by King Midas.
Food & Drink
|
November 19, 2021
2021-11-19
|
Live
|
$
15
On Power: Mark Sealy in Conversation with Vanley Burke, Dr. Kenneth Montague, and Richard Mark Rawlins
On Power: Mark Sealy in Conversation with Vanley Burke, Dr. Kenneth Montague, and Richard Mark Rawlins
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Aperture Foundation
Join Aperture for the second event in an online series celebrating As We Rise: Photography from the Black Atlantic. Drawn from Dr. Kenneth Montague’s Wedge Collection in Toronto—a Black-owned collection dedicated to artists of African descent—As We Rise looks at the multifaceted ideas of Black life through the lenses of community, identity, and power. From images of protests to photographs of Black beauty, the theme of power appears differently in the works of artists in the Wedge Collection. In this event, moderated by Mark Sealy, panelists will discuss how the concept of power plays a key role in their work and understanding of photography.
Film & Photography
|
November 22, 2021
2021-11-22
|
Live
|
$
FREE
The Fall of the Roman Empire: The History of a Dangerous Idea
The Fall of the Roman Empire: The History of a Dangerous Idea
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The British Museum
The idea that the Roman world had declined and required radical correction forms one of the most persistent and dangerous narratives in European history. This lecture spotlights the texts, art and architecture that reveal how the emperor Hadrian (AD 117–138), Charlemagne (AD 774–814), and King Charles V (1519–1556) used the promise of Roman restoration to thrust radical and often violent changes onto the Mediterranean world. Their examples show the power this idea had, and the risk that unchallenged claims of social decline and promises of renewal still pose today.
Culture & Politics
|
November 22, 2021
2021-11-22
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Buttermilk Bourbon Pumpkin Pie with Kate McDermott
Buttermilk Bourbon Pumpkin Pie with Kate McDermott
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92nd Street Y
Just in time for your Thanksgiving baking, the pumpkin pie to take out all others! The Pie Lady, James Beard Award-winning author Kate McDermott, returns with an interactive class that will leave you fully prepared to make her luscious, amped up, gently boozy update of a harvest table classic — and the only pumpkin pie recipe (and techniques!) you’ll ever need. This class will take place on Monday, November 22 from 6:30-8 pm ET and will be recorded for later viewing by patrons.
Food & Drink
|
November 22, 2021
2021-11-22
|
Live
|
$
30
The Gendered Brain
The Gendered Brain
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Sydney Opera House
For centuries, science has been trying to prove that men's and women's brains are different. In her myth-smashing book, The Gendered Brain, Professor Gina Rippon dismantles this idea. Unpacking the dubious historical science, like 18th century experiments that saw empty skulls measured with bird seed, Rippon shows how early research fueled the persistent myth that female biology is inferior. She presents cutting edge neuroscience to detail how our brains are highly plastic, individualised, adaptable and full of potential. What if our behaviour is linked not to gender, but to life itself, to all we do and experience? Hosted by award-winning science journalist Natasha Mitchell. Recorded live from the Sydney Opera House in 2020.
Science & Nature
|
November 27, 2021
2021-11-27
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
Virtual Views: Gordon Parks
Virtual Views: Gordon Parks
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Museum of Modern Art
In July 2020, MoMA hosted a live Q&A with Sarah Meister, curator in MoMA’s Department of Photography; Nicole Fleetwood, professor at Rutgers University and curator of the MoMA PS1 exhibition Marking Time: Art in the Age of Mass Incarceration; and Khalil Muhammad, professor at Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government and former director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, as they discuss Gordon Parks’s work, as part of our Virtual Views initiative.
Film & Photography
|
November 27, 2021
2021-11-27
|
On-Demand
|
$
FREE
Online Role Play: BADWRONGFUN
Online Role Play: BADWRONGFUN
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Tate Britain
Badwrongfun is a larp (live action role play) workshop led by artist Adam James. Discover a virtual and interactive world created by James as part of KEMENETH, an artist’s project in collaboration with St Ives communities. Meet The Inclusive Isolationist Society at 'The Island of Strange Events' and chat with The Fiery Foraging Warriors at their camp. In this online role-play, players will explore the settings, characters and scripts generated through KEMENETH while interacting with each other in character. This role-play session will begin with a workshop in which players are led through character development, rules and setting. No previous experience required, all welcome. This event takes place online using Mozilla Hubs. A stable internet connection is required with use of headphones and microphone.
Art & Music
|
November 28, 2021
2021-11-28
|
Live
|
$
FREE
Contemporary Personal Narratives by Asian American Women: A Cultural Exploration
Contemporary Personal Narratives by Asian American Women: A Cultural Exploration
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92nd Street Y
Cultural historian Lori Rotskoff, PhD, leads participants on a three-session, multi-genre exploration of recent contributions to contemporary literature and culture by Asian-American women writers, illustrators, and photographers. Focusing on personal narrative and autobiographical storytelling, discover how these authors and visual artists of Korean and Chinese descent tell the stories of their lives. Participants will gain a greater familiarity with several recurring themes in this rich and varied body of work — including cultural identity and belonging; family relationships in the context of immigration, assimilation, and xenophobia; the significance food and culinary traditions; navigating mental health challenges and difficult emotions such as anger, loneliness, shame, and grief; ethnic stereotypes related to appearance, beauty, and achievement; and the redemptive power of creativity, art, and critical expression.
Reading & Writing
|
November 30, 2021
2021-11-30
|
Live
|
$
105
Matisse and Picasso
Matisse and Picasso
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Barnes Foundation
This course explores one of the most important relationships in the history of art: the friendly rivalry between Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso. Both painters are credited with shaping the future of modern art in the early 20th century—Matisse with his jarring arrangements of color, and Picasso with his devastating fracturing of the visual field. But neither artist developed his ideas in a vacuum. Rather, each was keenly aware of what the other was doing—absorbing, bristling, and reacting on canvas in a kind of game that Matisse once described as a “boxing match.” Focusing on 8 major paintings in the Barnes collection that represent key moments in the artists’ early careers, we will explore this seminal dialogue that changed the very idea of what painting should be. This course takes place on-site, in the Barnes collection, and also allows online enrollment. All students may participate in class discussions.
Art & Music
|
December 1, 2021
2021-12-01
|
Live
|
$
220
Adam Gopnik on Molière
Adam Gopnik on Molière
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92nd Street Y
Back by popular demand! Adam Gopnik delivers a three-session online seminar coinciding with the 400th anniversary of Moliere’s birth and the publication of Richard Wilbur’s translations of his plays by the Library of America. “Richard Wilbur’s Molière lives both as masterpieces of the translator’s art and as witness to a hopeful (and still not quite finished) American moment,” Gopnik writes. “Though Molière made his life in and around courts, his role was to become the first great comic poet of the emerging and ascendant middle classes. Wilbur came to Molière at a moment when that same bourgeoise in America was newly ascendant in another way—when a highly educated post-war culture had taken happy possession of a European cultural heritage then undermined on its own ground.” Discounted copies of Wilbur’s translation of Molière, with introduction by Adam Gopnik, may be purchased with your registration, courtesy of Posman Books. We recommend purchasing the book bundle option by November 1 to ensure timely delivery. If you are purchasing a bundle, please include your current shipping address during checkout, or email it. The Library of America edition of Wilbur’s Molière plays includes The Bungler, Lovers’ Quarrels, Don Juan, The Misanthrope and Tartuffe, among others. Class meets Wednesdays: December 1, 8 and 15.
Reading & Writing
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December 1, 2021
2021-12-01
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Live
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$
100
Art with Friends: Art and Dallas
Art with Friends: Art and Dallas
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Nasher Sculpture Center
Want to take a trip? Take a virtual journey around Dallas discovering sights and sounds that inspire our city. We’re traveling light, so just bring a pencil and some paper! The Nasher Sculpture Center will share this interactive workshop for school-age children as part of the Dallas Public Library's ongoing series, Art with Friends. This is a free program, but advance registration required for interaction. This virtual program is a partnership with the Dallas Public Library. To register visit the Dallas Public Library.
Art & Music
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December 1, 2021
2021-12-01
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Live
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$
FREE
Online Course: Portraits
Online Course: Portraits
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Guggenheim Museums
In this course, we’ll explore the history of portraiture, in its many forms, through works from the Guggenheim’s collection. Historically, painted portraits were commissioned by wealthy patrons, state officials, and clergy often to convey beauty, wealth, and power. But the invention of photography, with its relative affordability and ubiquity, allowed more people of all backgrounds access to portraiture. It also allowed modern artists, like Pablo Picasso, to focus on portraits of friends and lovers. We’ll look closely at portraits, self-portraits, and family albums; as well as non-traditional portraits of places and abstract or conceptual portraits. Over four sessions, we will discuss how the imagery and meaning of portraiture has changed over time, examining ideas about beauty, the gaze, the politics of representation, and the importance of visibility. Learners from all backgrounds are invited to participate in this collaborative online learning experience through live group sessions and independent creative response. Led by museum educator Maya Jeffereis, each session includes guided discussions of artworks and archival materials. Optional readings and creative activities will be offered. All course sessions will be led virtually through Zoom. A Zoom link and password will be emailed ahead of the course. All times listed in Eastern Time (ET).
Art & Music
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December 1, 2021
2021-12-01
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Live
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$
160
Adult Virtual Workshop: Toned Paper Portrait
Adult Virtual Workshop: Toned Paper Portrait
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Cleveland Museum of Art
Using a Rembrandt van Rijn self-portrait etching as a model, participants create a tonal drawing observing lights and darks. Participants tone the paper using graphite and remove areas of graphite with a kneaded eraser to create the lights of the drawing.
Art & Music
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December 2, 2021
2021-12-02
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Live
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$
40
Salt Printing: Demonstration & Conservation
Salt Printing: Demonstration & Conservation
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Eastman Museum
One of the earliest methods for printing photographs was known as salt printing. Introduced by William Henry Fox Talbot in 1839, the salted paper method involved printing the image by light rather than developing with chemicals. In this webinar, Historic Process Specialist Nick Brandreth will demonstrate how salt prints are made. Then, Sarah Casto will discuss salted paper prints from a conservator's perspective.
Film & Photography
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December 3, 2021
2021-12-03
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Live
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$
12
On Lubaina Himid's Practice
On Lubaina Himid's Practice
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Tate Britain
Join us for this series of participatory seminars on the artistic practice of Lubaina Himid. In celebration of Tate Modern’s exhibition of Lubaina Himid’s work this series of six online events takes a closer look at her expansive practice, covering topics and themes such as colour, opera and collaborative practice. Led by a facilitator these 2-hour online seminar sessions offer an opportunity to discuss the work and its themes as a group. Each session is joined by a respondent with specialized knowledge of Himid’s practice contributing to the discussion, helping to steer the conversation. Each event includes smaller group discussions and activities in breakout rooms, allowing for everyone to actively participate. This series is for those interested in Lubaina Himid’s practice and for connecting with other likeminded individuals through discussion. No prior experience or knowledge is necessary.
Art & Music
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December 8, 2021
2021-12-08
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Live
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$
7
Focus on Fiction
Focus on Fiction
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University of Chicago Graham School
This course will advance your understanding of fiction writing through lecture, discussion, eclectic readings, in-class and at-home writing exercises, as well as discussions of your own and your fellow students' written work. With a strong emphasis on drafting and strengthening the creative process, this class builds on the techniques and tools discussed in Basic Creative Writing. If you have not taken Basic Creative Writing, it's important to have some writing background and/or perhaps taken a foundational course at some point in your writing life.
Reading & Writing
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January 6, 2022
2022-01-06
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Live
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$
595
Art History From the Ground Up: One Week Intensive
Art History From the Ground Up: One Week Intensive
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School of the Art Institute of Chicago
Where can we start with Art? From cave paintings to the work being created right now, this speed-date with a complex discipline will whet your appetite for the art that is all around us. We'll discuss artists traditional and radical roles around the world, connecting style, structure, and meaning in new ways. Day 1: Thinking globally, looking locally; Day 2: Why is it called The Canon?; Day 3: How we discuss race, class, and gender - and how we don't; Day 4: Modernism; Day 5: Contemporary Art.
Art & Music
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January 10, 2022
2022-01-10
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Live
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$
250